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Full text of "Current Sauce (Volume 1984-1985)"

The Summer 



The Weather 



Current Sauce 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 



NATCHITOCHES, LA 



Partly cloudy all week, with 
highs in the upper 80's and low 
90's. A slight chance of 
thundershowers is in the 
forecast for Thursday and 
Friday. 



Vol. 73, No. 1 
June 12, 1984 



Currently 



FIVE WIN A WARDS 
IN WRITING CONTEST 

Five students have won awards 
and honorable mentions in the 
1984 College Writers Society of 
Louisiana annual contest. 

Second place prizes were won by 
Elizabeth Corley, senior drama 
major, for her play "My Turn, 
Sister," and Leslie Anne Gregory, 
sophomore, in the Louisiana 
poetry catagory, for "North 
Louisiana Chainsaw Massacre." 

Debra Waters, senior English 
major, won third place in 
Louisiana poetry for "Let the 
Good Times Roll," honorable 
mention in poetry for "Sea 
Shadows," and honorable 
mention in formal essay for 
"Terms of Endearment-Making a 
Good Thing Better." 

In feature stories, Juliet 
Snowdcn, freshman and Linda 
Verretl, senior, won honorable 
menti'ms. 

MILLER CHOSEN AS 
OFFICER OF THE YEAR 

Sgt. Bobby Ray Miller of 
Provencal, a member of University 
Police, has been selected as NSU's 
nominee for Officer of the Year in 
the Louisiana University Police 
Association. 

This year's recipient will be 
selected May 24 in statewide 
competition to be conducted in 
Monroe. The award, established in 
1981 to recognize and upgrade 
university police personnel across 
the state, will be presented this 
summer at the LUPA convention. 
The convention is scheduled for 
July 31 and Aug. 1 in Shreveport. 

Miller has been on the campus 
police force for 1 1 years and a 
staff member at Northwestern for 
the past 16 years. He currently is a 
shift supervisor with the campus 
police force. 

TAPE PROGRAM 
OFFERED BY 
COUNSELING CENTER 

A special service of the 
Counseling Center this summer is 
the cassette tape program. Tapes 
on topics such as test anxiety, 
preparing for exams, relazation, 
insomnia, low morale and stage 
fright are available for use between 
8 and 4:30 daily. 

The Counseling Center has a 
room set up with a tape recorder 
and an easy chair. All the student 
has to do is simply schedule a time 
to use the room and the tapes. 
Copies of the cassettes to take 
home may also be obtained. 

According to Dr. Millard 
Bienvenu, director of the coun- 
seling center, the tapes are most 
effective in helping students to 
improve study skills, classroom 
Performance, and achieve other 
individual goals. He discribed the 
regular use of cassettes as a form 
pfmental programming for the 
individual to achieve whatever he 
or she would like to. 



Camps Bring Students, Excitement 




by John Ramsey 



Fun in the Union 

Delegates at LASC participate in one of last week's general 
sessions in the Ballroom. 

Insiders Chosen For 
Summer Orientation 



Ten students have been 
chosen as Insiders for Inside 
View '84, Northwestern's sixth 
annual summer orientation 
program for new students. 

Selected as Insiders are Jeff 
Eversull, sophomore; Robin 
Gunter, junior; Melissa 
Hightower, sophomore; Jim 
Martin, senior; Cammy 
McClary, sophomore; Christi 
Moore, sophomore; Kim 
Nolde, sophomore; John 
Ramsey, sophomore; Beth 
Sandiford, junior; and Bubba 
Soileau, senior. 

Coordinators for Inside 
View are Barbara Gillis, 
director of orientation, and 
Dan Seymour, director of the 
placement office. The Ad- 
missions staff is also helping 
with the program. 



"Recent studies of summer 
orientation programs like 
ours," said Gillis, "have 
revealed that students who 
participate in one of these |§ 
programs are more actively 
involved in campus life. This 
is true for Inside View par- 
ticipants associate themselves 
with student publications, 
SGA, SAB, greeks, and other 
campus organizations." 



Placement tests and pre- 
registration are major parts of 
the program, but several fun 
activities are also planned, 
such as a Recreation Complex 
party, an Intramural half- 
niter, a dance, and Cabaret, a 
song-and-dance evening in the 
Union. 

Gunter commented that this 
year's Inside View "will be the 
best ever. We've got a great 
staff, and we're tying in the 
centennial theme to the 
program. It should be quite 
memorable." 



This year's sessions are 
scheduled for July 8-10 and 
July 15-17. While at NSU, 
incoming freshmen will live in 
the dorms and eat at Iberville. 




Editor 



Two bits... 

The cheerleading squad of 
Loyola High practice for last 
week's NCA competition. 



Two of the state's largest 
high school summer camps 
were on campus last week, 
bringing with them ex- 
citement, prospective 
students, and a crowded 
Union. 

The Louisiana Association 
of Student Councils' 
workshop ended Thursday 
after a five-day run. Ac- 
cording to Mr. Phil Gugliuzza, 
director, over 350 high school 
students attended. A junior- 
high LASC camp was held 
Friday through Sunday. 

Northwestern's largest 
camp, the National 
Cheerleader Association 
summer camp, held its first 
week of activities last week. 
Nearly 500 cheerleaders from 
Arkansas. Louisiana, and 
Texas attended. 

LASC incorporated several 
strange animals - among them 
the boa constrictor, water 
buffalo, and laughing hyena - 
as their group names. Each 
group of 15-20 students was 
led by a senior counselor 
(usually a high school advisor) 
and two junior counselors 
(made up of outstanding high 
school leaders, some of whom 
are now in college). 

During the week, the 
LASC'ers held several lear- 
ning sessions and participated 
in an fun and games evening, 
held a dance at the Coliseum, 
and made up various skits for 
the "LASC Big Event." 

NCA began its second 
session on Sunday, and the 
third and final session begins 
this Sunday. 

Mary Ackel, NSU's 
coordinator of the event, said 
"we've had few problems thus 
far. Of course, we still have 
two weeks left, but I really 
don't see any problems." 

"We've got excellent 
student workers this year," 
she added. "Without them, 
we couldn't pull it off." 

Most visiting students 
enjoyed the campus scenery 
and the friendliness of NSU 
students and staff, but not the 
dorms or Iberville cafeteria. 

"The campus was nice and 
hilly, and the signs in front of 
each building is a good idea," 
said Eric Faulk, an LASC 
delegate from Lafayette High. 
"But, I don't like roaches in 
my bed or community 



showers, and Rapides' air 
conditioning was too cold." 
He did indicate that he would 
consider Northwestern as his 
college choice, however. 

"The showers have to go, 
and the rooms have ugly 
paint" said Mar'Sue Chustz, a 
False River Academy 
cheerleader. Other than that, 
"this college is super-great, 
like a home away from home - 
perfect for the NCA clinic. I 
will come for camp again and 
later for college." 

Leesville's Julie Goins, who 
attended LASC, will not 
attend NSU since she will be 
a pharmacy major. "NSU has 
a nice campus, but ihe food 
was awful - blah! 

"I liked the shelf space in 
the dorms, but the halls were 
too long and spread apart. 
Sabine had spiders! Yuck!" 
was a comment by Tammy 
Bullard, a cheerleader from 
Pine Tree, Texas. She will not 




Mr. Phil 



Mr. Phil Gugliuzza of 
LASC works out program 
details with Vicki Williams of 
the Admissions office. 

attend NSU, since her mother 
is a Stephen F. Austin 
graduate. Despite the spiders, 
she enjoyed the camp. 

Lori Theriot, Tunie Faulk, 
and Sharlene Dyson, all from 
South Cameron High, agreed 
that "there were too many 
hills - they were a pain." They 
also liked Sabine - "it was the 
best part of the camp. It was 
clean and the rooms had 
enough storage space." 

Johnny Brock, boys team 
captain at Loyola, said "the 
campus really took us in and 
showed us a good time. 
Whenever I have a chance to 
come back, I will." 



June 12, 1984 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Vol. 73, No. 1 



News 



Intramural Champs Recognized at Banquet 



by Robin Gunler 



News Editor 



The 1983-84 Intramural 
Sports Award Banquet was 
held on May 2. Tootie Cary, 
director of Intramurals, was 
the master of ceremonies. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon was 
presented with the award for 
mens fraternity champions 
with a record-breaking point 
total of 10,220.8 and 50 out of 
51 events entered. TKE took 
the title from Kappa Sigma, 
who had won the cham- 
pionship for over nine con- 
secutive years. 



Sigma Kappa took first in 
the sorority division for the 
second straight year. Sigma 
Kappa participated in 50 of 51 
events. Tri-Sigma finished in 
second, almost 3,600 points 
behind the Kappas. 

The mens independent 
champion award went to the 
Kingpins, whose members hail 
from Louisiana to Venezuela. 
The Kingpins entered 37 
events, and outscored runner- 
up Yang 1000 by over 1,500 
points. 

For the fourth consecutive 
year, UnKappa Fifth won the 
womens independent 




NIL ,DS 



Quiet Conversation 



LASC counselors Mike Harelson and Tim Blanchard talk in 
front of LASC's theme - Student Council Needs U. 



championship. UK5 par- 
ticipated in 35 events, and 
outdistanced Christian 
Students by 2,300 points. 

Mr. and Ms. Intramural for 
1983-84 are Jeff Hartline of 
TKE and Renne Richard of 
UnKappa Fifth. 

Hartline participated in 27 
events, and Richard in 23 
events. He is a junior com- 
puter science major, and she is 
a junior photography major. 

Cary explained her feelings 
about the awards by saying, 
"It's not the winning or the 
losing that counts; it's the 
particiDation and having fun. 
It's the motivation and en- 



thusiasm that Jeff and Renee 
bring into my office or onto 
the fields, courts, etc. It's the 
promoting of Intramurals, the 
effort they put out, and its 
getting as many members as 
possible to participate." 

"And it's taking pride in 
being an Intramural 
representative," she added. 

MVP awards were given in 
four sports. Flag football 
awards were given to Cindy 
Wigley of Christian Students 
and David Reynolds of the 
Steelers. Denise Bossier of CS 
and Freddie Silva of Kingpins 
took top honors in volleyball. 
In basketball, Julie Robinson 
of Strait Shooters and Rodney 



Thrash of Yang 1000 received 
the award. Marion Johnson 
of Soft Touch and Frankie 
Silva of Kingpins topped the 
softball list. 

Point totals for the top three 
in each division are: 

Fraternity - TKE, 10,220.8; 
Kappa Sigma, 9,118.75; Sigma 
Tau Gamma, 7,045.8. 

Sorority - Sigma Kappa, 
9,712.5; Tri-Sigma, 6,125; Phi 
Mu, 5,187.5. 

Mens Independent 
Kingpins, 7,460.35; Yang 
1000, 5,879.1; Budmen, 
5,383.3. 

Womens Independent 
UnKappa Fifth, 8,288; 
Christian Students, 5,921.5; 
Odyssey, 1,700. 



To cover NSU's history 

Centennial Book Due In October 



by Gena Williams 



Staff Writer 



"It's something permanent 
that people will be able to read 
about the University and have 
a complete record of the 
school," said Dr. Marietta 
LeBreton last week about her 
new book, Northwestern State 
University of Louisiana, 1884- 
1984: History. 

The book is the centennial's 
official publication, and will 
be released in October by the 
NSU Press. 

"It's not boring; there is a 
lot of campus life as well as the 
administrative side," said 
LeBreton, who is a professor 
of history. 

Although she has written 
many articles, book reviews, 
and encyclopedia entries, this 
is her first attempt at writing a 
book. 

"Start early and expect a lot 
of hard work" is the advice 
LeBreton gives jokingly to 
anyone thinking of becoming 
an author. 



She added that most of the 
information came from 
college catalogs and old copies 
of Current Sauce and Pot- 
pourri. She also said that she 
corresponded with students 
and ex-presidents. 

"V.L. Roy was president 
for 18 years, and amassed a 
collection of about 19,000 
items," commented LeBreton. 



The book will contain in- 
formation like the origin of 
the Demon, how purple and 
white became Normal's 
colors, and interesting hap- 
penings such as the ghost. 

"We're trying to reach the 
alumni," said LeBreton of her 
book. "But it will be in- 
teresting to present NSU 
students as well." 



SAB elects Samuels as president 



Siephanie Samuels of 
Shrevepori lias been elected 
president of the Studeni 
Activities Board, an 
organizations formerly known 
as ihe Student Union 
Governing Board. 

Samuels, a junior jour- 
nalism major, was installed 
along with six other executive 
officers, six representatives, 
and three committee chairmen 
during the annual SAB spring 
banquet held recently. 

Other members of the SAB 
executive committee are first 
vice-president Rita Ravare, 
sophomore journalism major; 



second vice-president Jimmy 
Hartline, junior, accounting; 
secretary June Johnson, 
senior, marketing; treasurer 
Joy Pilie, junior, computer 
science; parliamentarian 
Stacie Lafitte, senior, 
elementary education; and 
program editor Lisa Williams, 
senior, business a d - 
minist ration. 

The new representatives to 
the SAB are Vanessa Boyer, 
Christi Moore, Sharon 
Sampite, Rhonda Wilson, 
Dexter Anderson, and Beth 
Sandiford. 



Installed as committee 
chairmen were Judi Hum- 
phrey, lagniappe; Elaina 
Verret, fine arts, and Wanda 
Huhner, hospitality and 
decorations. 

Highlighting the SAB spring 
banquet was the presentation 
of the 14th annual Robert W. 
Wilson Award to outgoing 
president Charlene Elvers. 

Stacie Lafitte of Shreveport, 
who was the first vice- 
president this year, received 
the award for outstanding 
board member. 



ARE YOUR 
COLLEGE FINANCES IN 
CRITICAL CONDITION? 

Joining the Army Reserve can 
reduce your college costs. If you qual- 
ify, our Educational Assistance pro- 
gram will pay up to $ 1 ,000 a year 
of your tuition for four years. 

If you have taken out a National 
Direct or Guaranteed Student Loan 
since October 1, 1975, our Loan 
Forgiveness program will repay 15% 
of your debt (up to $10,000) or $500, 
whichever is greater, for each year 
you serve. 

If you'd like to find out more 

about how a Reserve enlistment can 

help pay for college, call the number 

below. Or stop by. 

SS Harry Harrell 
U.S. Army Recruiting Station 
119 Royal Street, Natchitoches, LA 
357-8469 

"ASK ABOUT OUR BUDDY PLATOON" 

ARMY RESERVE. 
BE ALL YOU CAN BE. 



Vol. 73, No. 1 



CURRENT SAUCE 



June 12, 1984 



News 



3 



Blue Key Celebrates Silver Anniversary 



The undergraduate chapter 
of the Blue Key National 
Honor Fraternity recently 
celebrated its 25th an- 
niversary, and highlighting the 
observance was the initiation 
of new members and 
presentation of awards during 
the spring banquet in the 
Union Ballroom. 

Initiated into the honory 
service organzation for men 
were Russel Bienvenu, junior, 
business administration; Don 
Brewer, senior, computer and 
information systems; Bruce 
Bryant, senior, journalism; 
Richard Chunn, junior, 
microbiology; Britton Eaves, 
sophomore, pre-med; Terrry 
Flippo, junior, English 
education; Kenneth A. Foster, 
junior, accounting; Chris 
Ingram, sophomore, general 
studies; Dennis Jeffares, 
sophomore, pre-optometry; 
Chris Maggio, junior, physical 
education; Brian Kennth 
Marshall, junior, industrial 
technology; Tommy Moore, 
junior, instrumental music 
education; Jon Mouser, 
senior, industrial 
management; Raymond 



Nabors Jr., sophomore, 
history; Michael Stephen 
Roderick, junior, geology; 
John F. Sacker, junior, 
nursing; Greg Shoalmire, 
sophomore, pre-law; Tim 
Sprowl, junior, industrial 
technology; and Michael Van 
Damia, senior, agri-business. 

In addition to the 19 new 
undergraduate members, three 



faculty and staff members at 
Northwestern were initiated 
into Blue Key. They were Dr. 
William Poe, professor of 
history, Sam Smith, assistant 
dean of students, and Eugene 
Christmas, athletic trainer. An 
honorary membership was 
also presented to Merry Smith, 
secretary to the dean of 
students. 



Elise James, assistant 
professor of business, received 
the Dudley Fulton Award for 
outstanding contributions by a 
member of the university 
community. The award was 
established in 1970 in honor of 
Fulton, who served for many 
years as dean students. 

Other honors presented 
during the banquet were Blue 



Key Sweetheart to Cindy Ernst 
of Natchitoches and honorary 
lifetime sweetheart to Mrs. 
Beverly Bosarge. 

Students installed as officers 
of the undergraduate Blue Key 
chapter at Northwestern were 
Mike Maguez, president, Scott 
Burt, vice-president; Jacobs, 
secretary, and Barrett Mc- 
Clinton, treasurer. 



Ten students awarded 
Cheerleading positions 



RESUMES 
ELECTRONICALLY PRINTED ! ! 



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While You Wait 
100 Copies - $ 10 00 

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Next To A & A Western 
240 Keyser 352-2935 



Ten students have been 
awarded scholarships to 
perform this fall as members 
of Northwestern's first-ever 
football cheerleader squad. 

Unlike previous years, the 
squad will perform only in the 
fall. A pom-pon squad will be 
chosen for the spring semester. 

Upperclassmen include Julie 
Browder, sophomore; Jimmy 
Chilton, senior; Theresa 
Guillory, sophomore; Melissa 
Hightower, sophomore; Scott 
Repp, senior; and Laurie 
Weaver, senior. 

The remaining four 
cheerleaders are incoming 
freshmen. They are Mark 
Colomb of Holy Rosary 
Institute in Lafayette; 
Albertha Jones of Lafayette 
Northside High; Sonya Roark 



of Highland Park High in 
Dallas; and Stacy Thurmon of 
Jennings' Hathaway High. 

The squad will attend a 
national cheerleader workshop 
in Memphis in August. 

"This new system is good," 
said Repp. "Unlike past 
years, we shouldn't have an 
apathy problem when spring 
rolls around. We've got ten 
pretty good people, and we 
should do well this fall. " 




Renovations Complete 

One of Fournet Hall's larger classrooms, which holds 150 
students. Fournet will be reopened in the fall. 



Musical Revue Set for Saturday 



HEED CASH? Earn $500 plus each school year, 
2 4 (flexible hours per week placing and filling 
posters on campus. Serious workers only; we 
give recommendations. Call now for summer 
and next fall. 1 800-243 6679. 



"I Remember It Well," an 
enchanting musical revue of 
Broadway hits directed by 
Joshua Logan, will be 
presented Saturday night at 
8:15 in the auditorium of the 
A.A. Fredericks Center. 

The production features 
narration and humorous 
anecdotes by Logan and show 
scores composed by such 
greats as Rodgers and Hart, 



Irving Berlin, Rodgers and 
Hammerstein, and Harold 
Rome. General admission 
tickets are $10 each. 

The Louisiana Outdoor 
Drama Association is 
sponsoring "I Remember It 
Well" as a benefit for "Huck 
and Jim on the Mississippi," a 
new musical which premiers 
this summer at the Grand 
Ecore Ampitheatre. The show 



will be sponsored by LODA, 
Northwestern, and the 
Louisiana School. 

Logan won ihc Pulitzer 
Prize as co-auihor of "South 
Pacific" with Oscar Ham- 
merstein. Among his many hit 
productions as a world- 
renowned dirccior and 
producer are "Paint Your 
Wagon," "South Pacific," 
and "Camclot." 



The Bookstore 
Will Be Closed 
For Inventory 
June 21-22 



Please Plan Accordingly 



Summer events 
Planned by SAB 



The Student Activities 
Board has planned several 
movies and activities for 
students' summer enjoyment. 

All movies will be shown in 
the Student Union Addition at 
9 a.m. and 5 p.m. daily. 

SAB is supporting Elycia 
Graham, Miss LOB 1984, at 
the Miss Louisiana Pageant on 
June 21-23. Students in- 
terested in attending should 
contact the SAB office. Also, 
the 4th of July party will be a 
day of fun, with games and 
lots of refreshments planned. 

SAB meetings are held each 
Tuesday; call the office for 
information. 

The summer move line-up 
starts with Hotdog, a typical 
teen-age fun on the slopes 
movie - full of sex and 
comedy. It will be shown June 
11-15. For Your Eyes Only 
will be shown June 18-22. It's 
an adventure movie packed 



with wild stunts that only 
Bond - James Bond - can do. 

Strange Brew stars Bob and 
Doug MacKenzie of SCTV 
fame. The two have a good 
time on the screen. Will it be 
the comedy of the year, eh? 
See it June 25-29 and find out, 
you hoser! 

Rocky III fights its way into 
the Addition from July 2-5. 
Sylvester Stallone tries to win 
his title once more. Natalie 
Wood's last film, Brainstorm, 
will be July 9-13. 

From July 13-15 is one of 
the region's biggest events - 
the Natchitoches Folk 
Festival. All Northwestern 
summer students are admitted 
free with a valid ID. 

Finally, the summer will 
come to a close with David 
Nivens in The Curse of the 
Pink Panther. Inspector 
Clou^eau will undoubtedly 
mess things up again. 



June 12, 1984 



CURRENT SAUCE 



4/5 




The Gulf Star Conference: 

ANewNoies 



NICHOLLS STATE 




Nicholls State University 
was founded in 1948 as 
Francis T. Nicholls Junior 
College, and was a part of 
the LSU system. 

Nicholls gained its 
"independence" from LSU 
several years later, and like 
Northwestern, was granted 
university status in 1970. 
Nicholls' campus is 
alongside Bayou 
Lafourche, and some 6,500 
students attend class at the 
school. 

School colors at Nicholls 



are red and gray, and the 
Colonel is the mascot. 
Along with Northwestern, 
the Colonels have been a 
member of the TAAC in all 
sports except football and 
track. 

Northwestern leads the 
overall series with the two 
schools, 6-5. Southeastern 
is the big rival for the 
Colonels, and the two play 
each year in the "Riverbell 
Classic", south Louisiana's 
answer to the State Fair 
Classic. 




An aerial view of the Nicholls State University campus in 
Thibodaux. 



SAM 
HOUSTON 

STATE 



Sam Houston State 
University is located in 
Huntsville, Texas, a small city 
of central Texas. 

Over 12,000 students attend 
Sam Houston. Like Stephen 
F. Austin and Southwest 
Texas, the school has been a 
part of the Lone Star Con- 
ference since 1931. When the 
three schools withdrew from 
the LSC to join the Gulf Star, 
only five teams were left. 

Sam Houston's colors are 
orange and white, and athletic 
teams are known as the 
Bearkats. 

While the 'Kats are not 
known for their strength in 
football, Sam Houston an- 
nually dominates the region in 
golf and other spring sports. 
On the grid, the Demons and 
Bearkats have met six times, 
with each squad winning 
three. The 1984 contest in 
Turpin Stadium will be the 
first meeting of the two teams 
since 1958. 




Design, Layout, and Content 
by 

John Ramsey 



Editor 



In this, Northweyear 
to Louisianans, Itic t< 
begin a new era - petiti 
newly-formed Gullpnce. 

For several yeans ha 
part of the TranAthk 
ference. TAAC dfootb 
the gridiron Denhot < 
NCAA Division ij. N 
peted as an indejol, a 
since 1980 have fiu-AA 
Top 20. 

Five universitiewestei 
GSC. Texas entrifoust 
Southwest Texas SU's 1 
rival Stephen F. Ailhe ad 
SFA makes the anr Chii 
a conference game 

Nicholls State aern L 
round out the Gu Nicl 
SLU have been onltball 
for a number of yel 

Not only will tl? help 
and track (TAA0e tra 
petition), but it wilbrts ii 
six schools are clcfAAC 
locations ranged fteorgi; 
Texas. 

Coaches, studenU cor 
are generally excitkic a 
GSC. And why jnfere 
bring more moneies, r 
posure, and increport 
games. And it surt that 
football is being pral G 
sportswriters to ? in t 
ference. 



The Criminal Justice Center at 
Houston State in Huntsville, Texas. 



Sam 




STEPHEN F. AUSTIN 

STATE 

:f9 ™ 





Steen Library is one of the modern buildings on the Stephen 
F. Austin campus. 



Natclt city, 
Nacogcuis the 
site ol Nor- 
thwesterivals, 
Stephen State 
Univers 

SFA >n a 
beautiftfct of 
land, s i s 
enhanced of 
a historit. 

PurplC the 
school's the 
mascot ifck. 

Each:* of 
the gami and 
SFA recfldo, 
a nine-ft la n. 
NSU w( ; ven 
years str ^-25 
homecol the 
'Jacks in 



Vol. 73, No. 1 M'Z22m*>* . 



Spotlight 



Tomtern Tradition 




— f- 

)rthwelyear of service 
ans, Itic teams will 
era -petition in the 
:d Gulfence. 
il yeans have been a 
: TranAthletic Con- 
dfootball; thus, 
1 DenW enter the 
sion It. NSU com- 
i indejol, and twice 
ave fiil-AA national 

ersities western in the 
s entrilouston State, 
"exas SU's long-time 
a F. Aihe addition of 
the anr Chief Caddo 
: game 

state aern Louisiana 
he Gu Nicholls and 
een onltball schedule 
r of yei 

will tb help football 
TAAOe track com- 
lt it wiprts in that all 
are cWAAC, school 
nged fieorgia to west 

studenU community 
y excitetic about the 
I why inference will 
moneies, more ex- 
1 increport at away 
d it suit that Demon 
being F al Gulf Star 
s to ? in the con- 



"Jacogd 
ite o 
hwestefivals, 
Stephen 
Jnivers 

SFA >n a 
>eautiftict of 
and. s i s 
mhanc^ce of 
i historft. 

Purpl£ the 
chool's the 
lascot fck. 

Each j r of 
ie gamjand 
FA recPdo, 

nine-f(f a n. 
JSU w( ;v en 
ears str ^-25 
omecoi the 
Jacks ii^ 



SOUTHEASTERN 





Southeastern's newest addition, the 10,000-person University 
Center. In addition to being the home of SLU athletics, the coliseum 
hosts several concerts and events each month. 

town 40 miles east of Baton 
Rouge and 60 miles north of 
New Orleans. 

Green and gold are SLU's 
colors, and the Lion is the 
mascot. For several years, 
SLU has been a Division I-AA 
independent. 

NSU and Southeastern have 
met on the gridiron 45 times, 
with the Demons holding a 
tight 23-22 lead. Last season, 
SLU was nationally ranked 
before a 23-7 upset at the 
hands of Northwestern. 



Southeastern Louisiana 
University was founded in 
1925 as a junior college for 
students in Tangipahoa 
Parish. The school has since 
grown to its present day 
enrollment of 8,400. 

The university is located in 
Hammond, a small college 



SOUTHWEST TEXAS STATE 




,.ui»u««« ,, * u .'l 




The 11-story J.C. Kellam Library rises 
above the San Marcos River at Southwest 
Texas State. 



The heart of Texas - that's right 
where Southwest Texas State 
University is. 

Located in San Marcos, a small 
city between Austin and San An- 
tonio, STSU currently has over 
17,000 students. 

The mascot is the Bobcat, and 
school colors are maroon and gold. 
Prior to their entry into the Gulf 
Star, the Bobcats had been a part of 
the Lone Star Conference for over 
fifty years. 

Southwest and NSU have played 
only once in football. The Demons 
lost a 16-14 decision in San Marcos 
last season to the highly-touted 
'Cats, who won the NCAA Division 
II title in 1982. 




1984 Demon Football Schedule 

HOME GAMES AT HARRY "RAGS" TURPIN STADIUM 



Sept. 1 

McNEESESTA TE COWBOYS 
at Lake Charles 





Sept. 8 
ANGELOSTA TE RAMS 
at San Angelo, TX 



Sept. 22 

ABILENE CHRISTIAN 
WILDCA TS 
at Natchitoches 





Sept. 29 
NOR THEAST INDIANS 
at Monroe 



Oct. 6 

SOUTHWEST TEXAS STA TE 

BOBCA TS 
at Natchitoches (Homecoming) 




Oct. 13 

NICHOLLS STA TE COLONELS 
at Natchitoches 



Oct. 20 

LOUISIANA TECH BULLDOGS 
at Shreveport 





Oct. 27 
SAM HOUSTON STA TE 
BEARKA TS 
at Natchitoches 



Nov. 3 

SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI 
GOLDEN EAGLES 
at Hattiesburg, MS 





Nov. 10 
SOUTHEASTERN LIONS 
at Hammond 



Nov. 17 
STEPHEN F. AUSTIN 
LUMBERJACKS 
at Nacogdoches 




June 12, 1984 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Vol. 73, No. 1 



6 



Sports 



Sports 
Briefs 



TOP RANKED GOLFER 
SIGNS WITH DEMONS 

Jimmy C arroll, [lie (op ranked 
junior goiter in Brazil, is Ihc 
second golf recruit to sign with 
Northwestern. 

The 17-year old Carroll recently 
graduated from the American 
School of Rio de Janeiro in Brazil 
and will major in business at 
Northwestern. Jeff Pace, also of 
Rio de Janeiro and a close friend 
of Carroll's, earlier was the first 
Northwest ern golf recruit. 

"The signing of Jeff Pace and 
Jimmy Carroll gives us two lop- 
noich golfers who will be able to 
contribute to the success of our 
program immediately," said 
Coach David Thigpen. "Both arc 
excellent golfers along with being 
above average students in the 
classroom." 



NSU INKS PAIR 
FROM ALEXANDRIA 

Jerome Sampson and Barry 
Brown, a pair of all-around 
athletes from Alexandria Senior 
High, have signed national letters 
of intent lo compete in track and 
field for Northwestern. Both 
Brown and Sampson arc also 
expected to compete for the 
Demon football team. 



BASKETBALL CAMP 
SET FOR JUNE 24-28 

Northwester n's annual boys 
basketball summer camp will be 
held on campus June 24-28 under 
lite direction of Coach Wayne 
Yates and assistant coaches Wayne 
Waggooci and David Thigpen. 

Camp registration wil be held on 
Sunday, June 24. The camp will 
include three daily workout 
sessions during the week, with the 
camp concluding at noon on 
I'riday. June 28. 

The camp is conducted in 
Northwestern*' spacious Prat her 
Coliseum, while campers will also 
have Ihc benefit of using NSU 
dressing rooms, weight rooms, 
tennis courts and both indoor and 
outdoor swimming pools. 
Campers will stay in NSU dor- 
mitories. 

Anyone wishing further in- 
formation on the NSU summer 
basketball camp should contact 
coach Wayne Yates. 

SUMMER INTRAMURAL 
EVENTS PLANNED 

Summer Intramural events have 
already started and lite staff has 
many things planned. 

J-dn-3 Basketball started on 
Monday and goes through the 
28lh. 

The Coed pool Tournament 
starts June 21st at 4:00 p.m. in the 
Intramural Building (next to Rov 
Hall). 

The IM Prisbee Contest will 
start June 27th at 4:00 p.m. in the 
ROTC fields. 

Softball registration starts July 
2nd-6lh and plav begins Juiv 9th- 
18th at 3:00 p.m. IM fields. 

Coed Ciolf starts July I2lh at 
1:00 p.m. at the Recreation 
Complex. 



Relay Team Earns Sixth In Nation 



Northwestern's 400-meter 
relay team earned Ail- 
American honors for the third 
time in four years on June 1 
with a sixth place finish at the 
NCAA championships being 
held at the University of 
Oregon in Eugene. 

The Demons fought a 
strong wind and cool tem- 



peratures in running a 40.18 in 
the finals. Earlier, NSU was 
one of the eight teams in the 
national that qualified for the 
titlist round. 

The University of Georgia 
won a national track title for 
the first time in 48 years by 
winning the event. Following 



the Bulldogs were Baylor, 
Arizona, Oklahoma, and 
Arkansas. 

The Demon relay team 
consisted of senior Mario 
Johnson, juniors Edgar 
Washington and Percy 
McGlory, and freshmen 
Cedric Evans. This marks the 
third All-American year for 



Booster BBQ Set for Thursday 



The Demon Booster Club of 
Directors will sponsor a 
Western Style Bar-B-Q to 
kickoff the club membership 
drive for 1984-85. The Bar-B- 
Q will be held Thursday at 
Prather Coliseum. 

The second annual event is 
to kickoff the year activities 
for the club. The first annual 
kickoff party held a year ago 
served as a stepping stone to 
l he best year ever for the 
Booster Club. 

"The Bar-B-Q serves as a 
start for a new year within the 
booster club and gives the 
entire membership a chance to 
get together," said President 
Elise James. "Last year's 
party was a great success and 
we feel this year will be bigger 
and better. This serves as a 
time when everyone can get 
together to meet the coaches 
and staff of the athletic 
department." 



The evening will get started 
at 7 p.m., with music being 
provided by Home Brew. The 
Bar-B-Q meal will be served at 
8 p.m. and a short program 
will follow later in the evening. 

The initial event was held at 
the Recreation Complex a year 
ago. "We are having the party 
at the Coliseum for two 
reasons," noted James. "One 
we can still hold the activities 
outside, but yet have an in- 
door facility available in case 
of bad weather. Two, we have 
unlimited room at the 
coliseum." 

"We want this party to 
show our appreciation for the 
outstanding membership we 
had in the club during the 
1983-84 year," continued 
James. "And at the same time 
this will kickoff our fund 
raising activities and mem- 
bership drive for the 1984-85 
year." 



GSC well represented 
In recent NFL draft 



The newly formed Gulf Star 
Conference, which begins 
competition in the fall, was 
well represented in the recent 
draft of college players by the 
National Football League. 

Five former athletes and 
four schools were drafted in 
the top six rounds. Those 
players include linebacker 
Johnny Meads of Nicholls, 
Gary Reasons of Nor- 
ihwesiern, Van Hughes and 
Rod Clark of Southwest 
Texas, and Brett Wright of 
Southeastern. 

Meads, a linebacker, went 
to the Houston Oilers in the 



third round, while the New 
York Giants chose Reasons, 
also a linebacker, in the fourth 
round. Hughes, a tackle, went 
to Pittsburgh in the fifth, 
linebacker Clark to St. Louis 
in the sixth, and Wright, an 
All-American punter, went to 
the New York Jets in round 
eight. 

By comparison, the 
Southland Conference (which 
has Tech, McNeese, and NLU 
as members) also had five 
players picked in the draft, but 
none in the first seven rounds. 
The Lone Star Conference had 
just one player picked, in the 
11th round. 



We're New ( 

In Town V ^ 


SPECIAL »s] 
COPIES 

2VjC»2V 2 C«2 , / a C 

^ J. 


; ! kinko't copier 

j 352-815$ 
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The Bar-B-Q is open to all 
members of the booster club 
and to all people interested in 
becoming a member of the 
organization for the upcoming 
year. Northwestern coaches in 
all sports will be on hand to 
discuss their outlook for the 
upcoming year as the Demon 
and Lady Demon programs 
begin in the newly formed 
Gulf Star Conference. 



Johnson, while Washington 
earned All-American for the 
second time in three years. 
This was the first such honor 
for McGlory and Evans. 

"Our time wasn't what it 
has been, but the weather 
wasn't what we're used to 
either," said Coach Leon 
Johnson. "Still, we Finished 
with some very good schools. 
Mario had a great career at 
Northwestern and we'll miss 
his talents. But we have three 
others from today that will be 
back next year." 

With Johnson running the 
third leg, Northwestern State 
claimed the national title in the 
event in 1981. The following 
year, Johnson and 
Washington ran on the relay 
unit that placed second in the 
nation and last year the 
Demons placed tenth in the 
nation. 



GRADUATE STUDY 



IN CELL BIOLOGY, 
NEUROSCIENCE, 

DEVELOPMENT BIOLOGY, 
AND IMMUNOLOGY. 



Louisiana State University Medical 
Center in Shreveport offers 
graduate programs leading to either 
the Master of Science or Doctor of 
Philosophy Degree in the Depart- 
ment of Anatomy, annual stipends 
of $7200.00 with waiver of tuition 
fees are available to qualified 
students. 

For application forms and 
additional information contact Dr. 
John A. Beal, Coordinator of 
Graduate Studies, Department of 
anatomy, Louisiana State University 
School of Medicine. Shreveport, 
Louisiana 71130. 



m 





CURRENT SAUCE 



June 12. 1984 



Sports 



7 



Demon Netters Take TAAC Championship 



Led by conference Player of 
the Year Oriol Vega, the tennis 
team concluded one of its 
most successful seasons ever 
by winning the Trans America 
Athletic Conference cham- 
pionship. 

The Demons, claiming three 
singles titles, scored 65 points 
in the nine-team event to place 
ahead of Arkansas-Little 
Rock. Georgia Southern was 
third, followed by Houston 
Baptist, Centenary, Hardin- 
Simmons, Samford, Nicholls 
State and Georgia State. 

Vega, a freshman who 
ended the season with a 21-9 
overall record, won the No. 1 
singles title to earn Player of 



the Year honors. Veteran 
Demon Coach Johnnie 
Emmons was named as TAAC 
Coach of the Year as Nor- 
thwestern won its first tennis 
title in the league. Next spring 
the Demons will compete in 
the Gulf Star Conference. 

Northwestern ended the 
1984 season with a 19-4 dual 
meet record. Along with 
winning the league cham- 
pionship, the Demons placed 
ninth at the National In- 
vitational Tennis Tournament. 
In that event, the Demons 
defeated Kansas and Fresno 
State after losing a first round 
match to eventual champion 
Kentucky. 



With Average GPA above 3.0 

Tennis team awesome 
In the classroom, too 



While Northwestern's men's 
tennis team ended the season 
with a TAAC championship, 
the Demons were even more 
impressive in the classroom 
during the Spring semester. 

Three of the six players on 
the starting roster earned over 
a 3.00 grade point average, 
while the lowest GPA on the 
team was a 2.93. Those 
averages were earned by 
players who averaged more 
than 20 credit hours per 
person during the semester. 

The Lady Demon tennis 
team, which ended the season 
with an 11-9 mark, was even 
more impressive than the 
men's squad when it came to 
the classroom. 

Five of the top six Lady 
Demons were over a 3.00 GPA 
for the spring. 

"I think the grades are an 
outstanding reflection of the 
Players," said Coach Johnnie 
Emmons. "For the time they 
must spend to be successful on 
the courts, it's easy to see that 
they are putting their 



classroom time to good use." 

Freshman Oriol Vega, who 
was TAAC Player of the Year, 
ended the semester with a 4.00 
grade point average and ended 
his first year of college with an 
overall GPA of 3.97. 

Hugo Molina, the only 
senior on the squad, graduated 
with a 3.44 GPA, earning his 
business degree in seven 
semesters." Pierre Genevier 
posted a 3.60 while earning 23 
hours. Morris Brown finished 
with a 2.95, Francisco Acuna 
was a 2.94, and Jorge Salvo 
ended the semester with a 
2.93. Vega, Molina, and 
Acuna all won conference 
titles for the Demons. 

The Lady Demon squad was 
led in the classroom by Kim 
Tollett, who posted a 3.85 
grade point. Freshman 
Monica Isaza was a 3.70, 
Angela Peterson earned a 
3.43, Liliana Isaza had a 3.16, 
and Ana Maria deFelippo 
earned a 3.05. Karla Tubbs 
rounded out the team with a 
2.41 GPA. Of the six, only 
two have below 3.00 for their 
college careers. 





The next John McEnroe? 

Oriol Vega, TAAC's Player of the Year, led the Demons to a ninth place finish in the NITT 
tournament in Monroe as well as a conference championship. Demon tennis had the best 
record of any NSU team in 1983-84. 



Wheeler and Rushing try their luck 



Demons Looking to NFL 



Wide receiver Jerry Wheeler 
and cornerback Tommy 
Rushing, two seniors on the 
1983 Northwestern football 
team, will try to continue their 
football careers in the NFL. 

Wheeler, a 6-1, 191 -pound 
native of West Monroe, at- 
tended a New York Giants 
mini-camp with former 
teammate Gary Reasons, who 
was drafted in the fourth 
round by the Giants. 

Rushing, a 6-2, 195-pound 
native of Haughton, has 
signed a free agent contract 
with the New York Jets. 
Rushing was a starter in his 
final two seasons at NSU. 

Rushing opened the 1981 
season as a starter in the 
opening contest at Boise State 
before suffering a knee injury 
and missing the rest of the 
season. This past year Rushing 
totaled 27 tackles while 
collecting two pass in- 
terceptions and breaking up 12 
passes and causing one 



fumble. 

Wheeler was the top receiver 
on the squad. Playing in just 
seven games, Wheeler had 24 
receptions for 421 yards and 
seven touchdowns, an average 
of 17.5 yards per catch. 
Wheeler had six catches in a 
loss at Abilene Christian and 
totaled 117 yards in receptions 
in a 24-20 loss at Alcorn. 

For his career Wheeler 
caught 95 passes for 1,574 
yards and 15 touchdowns. 
Wheeler's 95 catches tie him 
with Victor Oatis for the 



career lead in total receptions 
and Wheeler also holds school 
record for receptions in a 
game, 13, and most yards 
receiving in a game, 216. 
Those records both came in 
(he final game of the 1982 
season at Northeast. 

Wheeler also tied the school 
record for catches in a season 
with 42 receptions in 1982. 
The 15 career scoring catches 
is third on the list and the 
1,574 yards in receiving ranks 
second to Oatis in career 
totals. 



Baseball ends season 
With 17-45 record 



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JT'S NOT JUST A JOB, IT'S AN ADVENTURE. 



Nicholls State pitchers 
limited Northwestern to just 
one run and five hits in two 
games as the Colonels recently 
swept a twinbill from the 
Demons by scores of 2-1 and 
9-0. 

Northwestern ended the 
season with an overall mark of 
17-45 and a 7-17 record in 
TAAC action. 

In the first contest the 
Demons scored their only run 
of the day in the first inning. 
Scott Huscroft walked, stole 
second and scored on a 
fielding error. The Demons 
left the tying run on third in 
the top of (he seventh. 

Nicholls scored single runs 
in the fourth and fifth innings 
off Demon hurler Kevin 



Warner, who allowed just 
seven hits. 

Colonel pitcher Stan Fabre, 
who earlier this season lossed 
a no-hitler against ihe 
Demons, allowed just (wo 
hits. Warner and Randy Roc 
had the only Northwesiern 
hits. 

In the second contest 
Northwestern did little betier, 
collecting just three hits off 
winning pitcher Marty 
Plassmeyer. David Bailey had 
one hit and David Reynolds 
had two for the Demons. 

Nicholls scored five runs in 
the first and added two more 
in the second in taking early 
control against losing pitcher 
Carl Soileau. 



June 12, 1984 



CURRENT SAUCE 



8 



Vol. 73, No. 1 



Viewpoint 



International Athletics 

Is It All Over? 

This summer, the eyes of (most of) the world look 
to Los Angeles for the 1984 Summer Olympic Games. 
Unfortunately, politics has again entered into the 
event, and for the third straight Olympiad, the games 
are without some of the world's major competitors. 

The Soviet Union pulled out of the games over a 
month ago, and most of the Communist world has 
since followed. They claim the L.A. Olympic 
Organizing Committee cannot provide adequate 
security. How typical. 

The Russians' can not be concerned about the lack 
of security. The dormitories at USC and UCLA have 
been blitzed with security apparatus, ranging from 
alarm systems to video cameras to patrolmen. Not a 
boot camp, but a well-planned dormitory complex 
designed to prevent any acts of terrorism. 

The Soviets' real concern is "American 
propaganda." Not propaganda in the literal sense, 
but the American way of life. The Russian leaders do 
realize that if any of their athletes get a taste of 
America, especially southern California, not many of 
I hem will want to return home to Siberia. 

Revenge for the 1980 Moscow Olympics, when 
Jimmy Carter led the western world's boycott, is 
probably also a factor. The Soviet Union would love 
to pull an economic coup in L.A. similar to the one in 
Moscow. Americans, however, are a sports-loving 
people. The boycott will hurt only the competition, 
not the financial side of the Games. 

In 1976, it was several African nations. In 1980, it 
was the United States and the free world. In 1984, it 
will be the U.S.S.R. and the Communist world. Who 
will it be at the 1988 games in South Korea? Or will 
there be a 1988 Olympics? 

International politics must be kept out of multi- 
nation sports events such as the Olympics. Boycotts 
sometimes hurt the host country, but always hurt 
both the athlete and the spirit of competition. And 
today's world needs international competition in the 
stadium a lot more than it needs the competition on 
missile production lines. 

Current Quotes 



GARFIELD® by Jim Davis 



L at. 





Take Pride in Northwestern! 



A Different Kind of Editorial 



Most editorials are about subjects that 
upset or concern the individual who is 
writing it, but I would like to write one about 
something I am proud of - Northwestern 
State University. 

This campus is 100 years old and still 
going strong. Our Education department is 
still the best in the state and now we have 
excellent Nursing, Music, and Business 
programs - 1 could go on. 

Some of the buildings are old, but not run 
down. Those beautiful buildings show the 
culture, pride, and quality of Northwestern's 
history. The interiors of some of our finest 
buildings are newly remodeled so that we are 
not behind the times - the A. A. Fredericks 
Center is a perfect example. 

Our campus is one of Louisiana's largest, 
but it is not completely cemented. You can 
walk anywhere and there will be trees, grass, 
flowers, and many of God's creations to 
behold. 

The student population is perfect for 
getting to know people; each freshman class 
brings new faces and new friends. By all 
means. NSU students are the friendliness. 

We seem to feel that Natchitoches and 
Northwestern do not have enough activities 
to keep students involved, but there are over 
90 organizations on campus, from special 
interest to uncharted to governmental and 
greeks, that have activities that all students 



can participate in. Some events planned by 
SGA and the SAB are organized with us in 
mind, but each person who does not attend 
is not taking advantage of what Nor- 
thwestern has to offer. The more people, the 
more activities. Each organization can use 
someone who is willing to put forth the time 
and effort. We can make Northwestern a 
great place to have fun. 

There is so much potential at Nor- 
thwestern. Each curriculum, club, building, 
idea, and person can grow and change to 
become better and better. This is the perfect 

"Everyone should get in- 
volved. NSU has so much 
potential. " 

example to show how much potential we do 
have. Everybody is looking for new and 
better ways to do things; everyone is ready 
and eager to listen to your ideas with an open 
mind and help make them work. 

One-hundred years have gone by, as have 
many students who've attended this 
university. I know, however, that 1 am 
proud to say I'm a Demon from Nor- 
thwestern State University in Natchitoches. 

by Robin J. Gunter 

News Editor 



Should the University of Southwestern Louisiana be allowed to change its 
name to the University of Louisiana? 




<Pf*3 

Randy Bonnette 
Graduate student 

"No. UL would make LSU 
sound like a farce. We don't 
have two state universities, 
which the name change would 
imply." 



Melissa Hightower 
Sophomore 

"Yes. LSU shouldn't have 
the right to stop other schools 
from changing their name. 
They should stop being so 
political." 



Dr. Marietta LeBreton 
Professor of History 

"No. Southwestern is not a 
statewide university - it is a 
regional one, just like Nor- 
thwestern." 



Ashton Langlinais 
Senior 

Yes. USL is getting just as 
big as LSU, and their com- 
puter program is among the 
best. Maybe it'll help them get 
rid of their 'coon-ass' image. 



Current Sauce 

Summer Staff 
USPS 140-660 



John Ramsey 
Editor 

Robin J. Gunter 
News Editor 

Darlene Winslow 
Features Editor 

Gena Williams 
Staff Writer 

Franklin I. Presson 
Advisor 

Current Sauce is published every 
other Tuesday during the summer 
session by students of Nor- 
thwestern State University of 
Louisiana. 

Editorial offices are located in 
225A Kyser Hal', and office hours 
are 12:30-4:00 p.m. weekdays. 
The phone number is (318) 357- 
5456. 

All correspondence, inquiries, 
etc. should be mailed to Box 5306, 
NSU, Natchitoches, LA 71497. 



o. 1 



Current Sauce 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 

NATCHITOCHES, LA 



Vol. 73, No. 2 
June 26, 1984 



Northwestern 

Sue University of Igujsiana 




Celebration 0/ a Century 
1884-1984 



KH 



Inside View begins its 
first session next Sunday, 
as nearly 200 incoming 
freshmen will experience 
NSU for the first time as 
collegians. 

The program will end on 
Tuesday, July 10. Session 
two, traditionally larger than 
the first session, begins on 
Sunday, July 15. 

Inside View will acquaint 
students with the 
University, its policies, and 
its students. All par- 
ticipants will live in Rapides 
or Sabine residence halls. 

Ten peer counselors - the 
Insiders - will be in charge 
of the program. Barbara 
Gillis and Dan Seymour are 
the University liasions with 
the program. 

For more information on 
Inside View, see pages 4 
and 5. The program is the 
subject of this week's 
spotlight. 




FOOTBALL 
PREVIEW 
page 6 



City Begins Chaplin's Cleanup 







■JiMi , 

-»./.•.•:•-'•;-'•> a-.. - ••• 






















The Culprit 

Pictured is the water treatment plant responsible for the 
sludge in Chaplins Lake. 



"Sludge" has become a part 
of the Northwestern 
vocabulary. Within two 
months, however, that word 
should be extinct. 

A barge known as the Mud 
Cat was positioned in 
Chaplin's Lake last week, and 
has begun cleanup of the 
sludge island, which consists 
of several tons of aluminum 
sulfate and hydrated lime, 
both of which are non-toxic 
by-products of the Water 
Treatment Plant across the 
river from the campus. The 
project should be finished 
within 30 to 40 days, ac- 
cording to Ben Mayeaux, city 
director of community affairs. 

Mayeaux said the sludge 
will be pumped into the first of 
four ponds located on the 
property of the Natchitoches 
Regional Airport. As the 
wastes settle to the bottom, 
the overflow will spill into the 



second pond, and so on. 

The sludge will travel 
through some 5,000 feet of 
pipe to the pond area. When 
the last pond fills, the water 
will spill back into the lake, 
free of the waste sediments. 
The water level of the lake will 
drop about two feet while the 
project takes place. 

After the water has drained 
back into the lake, the city will 
disc the filled ponds, fertilize 
the soil, and return the land to 
normal use. 

The EPA ordered the lake 
cleaned in February, and gave 
city officials until late 1 987 to 
solve the problem and to 
prevent it from happening 
again. 

Joe Sampite, mayor, said 
the entire project will be 
completed well before the 
federal deadline and the lake 
will be restored to its natural 
beauty. 



Summer Enrollment Drops Slightly 



Summer enrollment on 
Northwestern's four cam- 
puses is the second largest in 
school history, but is down by 
92 students from 1983's 
record-breaking totals. 

As of Friday, 5,484 
students were enrolled in 
Northwestern classes. Like 
last summer, there were more 
graduate students than un- 
dergraduates. Overall, there 
are 1,838 men and 3,646 
women enrolled at Nor- 
thwestern. 

The College of Graduate 
Studies and Research 
reported 3,447 students, of 
which 967 are men and 
2,480 are women. In 1983, 
3,372 graduates were 
enrolled. 

There are 202 students 
enrolled this summer in the 
College of Liberal Arts. This is 
an increase of nine from 
Liberal Arts' 1 983 total. Their 
are 96 men and 106 women 
in the college. 

Another college that gained 
enrollment was the College of 
Basic Studies and Academic 
Services, which reported 847 
students, a 99 per cent in- 
crease from last summer's 
total of 426. Of the 847 
students, 479 are men and 
368 are women. 

Northwestern's three other 
undergraduate colleges all 
experienced drops in 
enrollment this summer. 



The College of Business 
reported 347 students, as 
opposed to 556 in 1 983. In 
Business, there are 202 men 
and 145 women. 

Enrollment in the College of 
Nursing also dropped from 
1983, when 443 students 
were taking classes. This 
summer, 417 students are 
enrolled. The college has 44 
men and 373 women. 

The College of Education's 
enrollment slacked off slightly 
this summer, also. The 
college reported 222 
students, compared to 
1983's total of 275. Of the 
222, 50 are men and 1 72 are 
women. 

"Our decrease in un- 
dergraduate enrollment is a 



national trend,'' said Dr. Ray 
Baumgardner, registrar. 
"Most of the undergraduates 
here this summer are incoming 
freshmen eager to start 
college and seniors who see 
the light at the end of the 
tunnel." 

The increase in the graduate 
school suprised some ob- 
servers, as the PIPS 
(Professional Improvement) 
program may be eliminated. 
"Our graduate enrollment will 
hold its own for the next 
couple of years. When PIPS 
is phased out, the governor 
may come in with a career 
ladder type of program." 

The number of semester 
hours being taken determines 
NSU's budget from the state. 



This year, NSU's 5,484 
students are taking 25,059 
semester hours. According 
to Baumgardner, Nor- 
thwestern receives three 
times the amount of money in 
the budget for every graduate 
semester hour as un- 
dergraduate semester hour. 
"That's where our graduate 
enrollment really helps." 

Northwestern is also unique 
because its summer 
enrollment is nearly that of the 
fall and spring. In regular 
semesters, between 6,100 
and 6,700 students enroll. 
Most schools average a 
summer school enrollment of 
about 30 percent of their 
regular enrollment; NSU 
averages almost 90 percent. 



Press Announces Book Sales 



The NSU Press has begun 
pre-publication sales for 
Northwestern State University 
of Louisiana, 1884-1984: A 
History by Dr. Marietta 
LeBreton, professor of 
history. 

A special project com- 
missioned especially for this 
fall's 1 00th anniversary 
celebration, the book will be 
approximately 400 pages with 
photographs, appendices, 
bibliography, index, and cloth 
bound with dust cover end- 



papers. 

The pre-publication cost, if 
purchased before Sept. 1 , is 
$20 per copy, which includes 
postage and handling. The 
historical publication's official 
release date is October 6, the 
100th anniversary of Nor- 
thwestern's founding and the 
date of NSU's centennial 
homecoming. 

"One hundred years ago 
Northwestern was established 
as the first teacher-training 
institution in Louisiana," said 



LeBreton. "During its long and 
varied history the University, 
as a keystone of the state's 
educational system, has 
undergone numerous changes 
and met serious challenges." 

She adds, "It's development 
from a two-building secondary 
school to a modern multi- 
faceted university has not 
always been smooth and 
uninterrupted. But it has 
always been exciting and 
interesting." 



■ 



June 26, 1984 



CURRENT SAUCE 



2 



Vol. 73, No. 



Vol. 



NewsF 



"Huckand Jim" Set 
For Debut Next Week 



Chris Gray of Natchitoches 
and Stephen Thomas of Luling 
will alternate as Huck, and 
Vince Williams of Natchitoches 
will portray Jim in next week's 
premier of Joshua Logan's 
new stage musical, Huck and 
Jim on the Mississippi. 

The musical theater 
production, which features 
book and lyrics by Logan and 
music by composer Bruce 
Pomahac, will run July 6 to 
August 4 at the Grand Ecore 
Amphitheater. Performances 
each weekend are scheduled 
for Thursday, Friday, and 
Saturday at 8:1 5 p.m. 

Huck and Jim on the 
Mississippi is being produced 
and directed by Logan in 
cooperation with Nor- 
thwestern, LODA, and the 
Louisiana School. 

Gary and Thomas were 
selected to appear as Huck in 
alternating performances as a 
result of a "Huck Star Search" 
conducted for the musical by 
the Louisiana School. 

They were among 23 young 
people from throughout 
Louisiana who auditioned for 
Logan in hopes of winning the 
opportunity to portray Huck in 
the exciting new musical, 
which is based on Mark 
Twain's classic novel, 
Huckleberry Finn. 

Thomas has played the 
leading role in the St. Charles 
Community Theatre's 
production of Once upon a 
Mattress. He has also had 
leading roles in A Christmas 
Dream, The Return of the Pink 
Panther, and Show Biz Iz. 

As a vocalist at Hahnville 
High School, Thomas earned 
district and all-state choir 
honors as a tenor. He was a 
member of the high school a 
cappella^ choir and received 
excellent and superior ratings 
at district and solo and en- 
semble vocal music festivals. 

A 1984 graduate of Nat- 
chitoches Central, Gray's 
stage musical credits include 
playing the Scarecrow in this 
spring's production of The 
Wizard of Oz and Conrad 
Birdie in Bye Bye Birdie two 
years ago. 

Gray is a bass singer who 
has won such honors as all- 
state two years, all-district 
four years, and superior 
ratings winner three years at 
the state solo and ensemble 
vocal music festival. For four 
years, Gray received superior 
ratings for solo and ensemble 



performances at the district 
festival and also at the district 
and state vocal music rallies. 

Williams, a student at 
Northwestern, has received 
such acting awards as a 
nomination for the Irene Ryan 
Scholarship, the Amaco 
Award for Excellence, the 
National Society of Arts and 
Letters' Award for Merit in 
Drama and acceptance to 
Asolo State Theatre. 

Productions in which he has 
played leading roles include 
Getting My Act Together and 
Taking It On The Road, Home, 
and Twelfth Night. 

In addition to Gray, Thomas, 
and Williams, other principles 
in the new musical include 
Dale Higginbotham as the 
Duke, Jim Ford as the King, 
Lillian Taylor as the Widow 
Douglas, Elizabeth Corley as 
Mary Jane, Moldy Thornton as 
Susan, Britt Solano as Pap, 
and Lillian Cohen as Mrs. 
Brown . 

The staff includes Ray 
Schexnider and William Hunt, 
associate directors; Steve 
Wells, musical director; Chris 
Louisell, choreographer; Keith 
Woods, production stage 
manager; Michael Atkins, 
scenic design; Beverly Jane 
Thomas, costume design; 
Stephanie Ryals, lighting 
design; and Drew Moore, 
sound design. 




The premier season of Josh Logan's new stage musical, 
Huck and Jim on the Mississippi, will star Chris Gray (left) of 
Natchitoches as Huck and Vince Williams (right) of Nat- 
chitoches as Jim. Stephen Thomas of Luling will alternate 
with Gray in the role of Huck. The musical theatre production 
at the Grand Ecore Amphitheater in Natchitoches is 
scheduled for 8:15 p.m. on Thursday, Friday and Saturday 
from July 6 to Aug. 4. The musical is being produced and 
directed by Logan in cooperation with Northwestern, LODA, 
and the Louisiana School. 



Dorms To Undergo Repairs 



Several dormitories will 
undergo minor repairs within 
the next few weeks, ac- 
cording to Sam Smith, 
assistant director of student 
services. 



Six of the twelve bathrooms 
in Natchitoches Hall will be 
renovated. "We simply don't 
have the money to fix all 
twelve at the present time," 
said Smith. 



Plant Course Offered 



A three-week course 
surveying the plant kingdom to 
illustrate the kinds of species 
that humans depend upon to 
sustain life is currently being 
offered for Profesional Im- 
provement Program credit at 
NSU. The course ends on July 
6. 

The special summer course 
for teachers is being con- 
ducted by Dr. Arthur Allen, a 
professor of plant biology, 
who is a well-known en- 
vironmentalist and preser- 
vationist. 

The course features guest 



lectures by a specialist on 
medical drug plants and 
narcotics, an expert on 
sassafras gumbo file', a 
nationally-known author of the 
use of native plants in cooking 
and a Louisiana archivist 
knowledgeable of plants used 
by early settlers in northern 
Louisiana. 

Also included are field trips 
to wood processing in- 
dustries, a cotton oil mill, a 
soybean processing plant, 
and to the woodlands for an 
on-site study of wild plants. 



At Rapides Hall, there will be 
new glass doors at the main 
entrance, since the current 
doors are scratched up and 
present a poor appearance. 

Thermostats at Rapides will 
also be replaced, so that the 
air conditioning system will 
work properly in all rooms. 

Several parts of Louisiana 1 
and Varnado halls have been 
repainted, as have the 
bathrooms in three of Rapides' 
twelve floors. 

In the most expensive 
project, the roofs of Rapides, 
Sabine, and Iberville Dining 
Hall are being repaired. This 
project will cost about 
$300,000, said Smith. 

"Basically, we're still 
recovering from vandalism 
done in the spring," said 
Smith. "We do hope, 
however, to make all of our 
dorms a little better over the 
summer." 



News |fl 
Briefs 



REAGAN ROUNDUP 
ANNOUNCED 

Any student interested i 
participating in the "1984 
Reagan Roundup" shoulo 
contact Tod Klotzbach 
the SGA office, Student 
Union 222. 

"Even Democrats are 
welcome," said Klotzbach. 

Reagan '84 



In 
North 
Klotz 
the h 
NSU. 
came 
contr 
Nortt 

Thr 
electi 
tervie 
In th< 
SGA' 
plans 

Look 
contr 

■ 



UNION STATION 
WORK CONTINUES 

Progress on Unio 
Station highlights the wo 
being done this summer b 
the Student Activities 
Board . 

The Station's D.J. Booth 
is nearing completion, as is 
the floor. Plans for 
homecoming and State Fair 
week are being finalized 

Work is also being done 
on the SAB/lntramural 
calendar. Advertising 
space is being offered to 
campus organizations. 

Interested parties should 
contact the SAB in room 
214 of the Student Unioi 
before Friday. 

P.E. WORKSHOP 
TO BE OFFERED 



A one-hour workshop on 
the "Heavyhands Exercise 
System" will be conducte. 
Wednesday at 11 a.m. if 
the P.E. Majors Building. 

The instructor will be Jir 
Simmons, an associate 
professor in the Depart-, 
ment of Health, Physica 
Education and Recreation. 

For additional in- 
formation, call the. 
Department of Health, bla ze 
Physical Education and 
Recreation at 357-51 26. 

DEMONS SIGN 
TEXAN 

Terry Douglas from 
Stratford High School in 
Houston is the latest trad 
and field recruit signed by 
Coach Leon Johnson. 

Douglas, who also let 
tered twice in football as a 
prep, last summer placed 
eighth in the Junior Olympic 
Decathlon competition held 
at the University of Notre 
Dame. 



No I 

Las 



JN 



J, No 



Vol: 73, No. 2 



CURRENT SAUCE 



June 26, 1984 



Features 



3 



» 

s 



Klotzbach Discusses Views, Ambitions 



by John Ramsey 



Editor 



In April, the students of 
Northwestern elected Tod 
Klotzbach as SGA President, 
the highest student position at 
NSU. Klotzbach 's election 
came in one of the most 
controversial campaigns in 
Northwestern history. 



>UP 

sted in 
"1984 
should 
ach in 
Student 

Three months after the 
s ^ re election, Klotzbach was in- 
bach. terviewed by Current Sauce. 
3/£ ' n tne discussion he recalled 
SGA's past problems and his 
plans for the future. 



N 

IES 

Unioi, 
3 worl 
Tier b) 
tivities 

Booth 
l, as is 
s for 
ite Fair 

:ed 

j done! 
amura 
rtising 
red to. 

s. 

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Unior 



> 

lop Ol 
cercisej 
Jucted 
i.m. ir« 
ng- 

be Jim] 
sociatejj 
)eparM 
lysicaf 
ation. 
I in 

the 
lealth, 

and! 
126. 

I 



from 
tool in 
it trad 
ned by 
i. 

30 let 
ill as a 
placed 
HympiC 
>n held! 
Notrel 



Looking back on your 
controversial election as 



president, what changes will 
be made in the election 
code? 

I plan to tighten the loopholes 
in the code. SGA will also have 
an Internal Affairs committee 
composed of five senators. 
The committee will deal with 
problems concerning the 
constitution, election code, 
etc. 

Going into the fall, what do 
you see as SGA's strengths 
and weaknesses? 

Well, our strength is the fact 
that everyone sees a need for 
change in the SGA. The 
election proved that. On the 
weak end, we have a lack of 



communication among SGA 
members. 

What is your biggest con- 
cern about the upcoming 
year? 

There are two things that 
bother me - apathy and the 
budget. I really think everyone 
will work this year, but you 
always worry. And the budget 
is not really encouraging, but 
we're attempting to get 
financial help from local 
businesses and industry. 
Concerning your opponents 
in the election, Scott Repp 
and Greg Shoalmire. Do you 
plan to appoint them to any 
SGA position? 

I haven't talked to Scott since 




No More Pastime 



Last weekend, the Pastime nightclub on Highway 1 was totally destroyed in a late-night 
blaze. 



4f>( 



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the election, but Greg and I 
have spoken several times. I 
think Greg is planning to run 
for office in the fall, but if he 
doesn't or if he loses, I will 
appoint him to an office. 
Do you plan to implement 
any new programs in the 
fall? 

Definitely. I'm planning to 
expand the legal services 
program, and I'd like to 
provide some kind of income 
tax service for students. That 
way, people would be 
available to answer questions 
about whether or not students 
are supposed to count their 
federal aid and scholarships as 
taxable income, for example. 
Also, I'm planning on greatly 
increasing SGA's involvement 
in campus entertainment. We 
don't want to take away from 
SAB; just be there to help 
' tern. 

You mentioned a low 
budget. Will any programs 
or services be cut? 

Yes. I'm trying to generally 
cut back on expenses. In the 
past, cabinet members made 
$75 a month. Now, they'll 
make $50. It'll save money, 
plus get people who don't just 
do the job for the paycheck. I 
also did away with Spirit 
Chairman. It wasn't a paid 



position, but sometimes 
required money. We will keep 
public relations, legal ser- 
vices, student life, and 
Shreveport relations, though. 
Some students have com- 
mented that you've ap- 
pointed your political friends 
to vacant positions. Any 
comments? 

I have appointed students 
who've helped me out, but it's 
no different from any previous 
administration. Anyway, I've 
also offered positions to 
students involved in "rival" 
organizations. 

Where will Tod Klotzbach be 
ten years from now? 

Hopefully, I'll be involved in 
the national political 
scene - maybe with the 
Republican party. I love 
politics. For most it's a job, 
but for me, it's a hobby. 

In general, what should 
students expect from SGA 
next year? 

They'll get a new SGA, from 
reorganization to new faces. 
We have new committees, 
such as Student Life, to which 
any student can belong. 
Hopefully, SGA will work for 
the students next year, in- 
stead of being just another 
group on campus. 



Josh Logan Revue 
Thrills Local Crowd 



I Remember It Well, Josh 
Logan's musical revue of his 
life, played to a large, 
receptive audience last 
Saturday at the A. A. 
Fredericks Center's 
auditorium 

The audience was also 
treated to a preview of Huck 
and Jim on the Mississippi, 
which will run at the Grand 
Ecore ampitheatre for 14 
performances beginning July 
6. 

Logan ,has done it all on 
Broadway - written, produced, 



and directed. He is a native of 
Mansfield. 

Logan amused the audience 
with stories of early-morning 
songwriting sessions with 
Irving Berlin and of "horrible" 
songs written by Podgers and 
Hammerstein for South Pacific 
before they found the right 
tunes. 

Throughout the evening, 
Logan captivated the audience 
with interesting stories of 
famous people he has worked 
with, as well as amusing tales 
of the problems he's had with 
some of his works. 



NCA Ends Camps 



JT'S NOT JUST A JOB, IT'S AN ADVENTURE. 



The 1984 NCA summer 
camps are over after three 
weeks of fun and excitement. 
This is the sixth year that Mary 
Ackel has been the coor- 
dinator of the camps, and she 
feels that overall this was a 
very good clinic. 

Ackel said, "Enrollment was 
up this year; we had more out 



of state and first year 
schools " She also mentioned 
that in the last couple of years 
enrollment had leveled off 
because of other camps like 
NSU's which were not 
national. But she said, "I have 
heard that NCA is the best 
camp and many schools come 
back after trying others." 



June 26, 1984 



ICE 



4/5 




Inside View 1984 

The Newcois 



Festivals Add 



The NSU Recreation Complex 



Complex Offers "Fun in the Sun" 



What's exciting, relaxing, 
and a great place to go to have 
fun in the sun? Northwestern's 
Recreational Complex. 

The Rec has everything that 
any student could ask for, like 
an Olympic size swimming 
pool, pro tennis courts, a nine 
hole golf course, the party 
Pavillion, and a fully equipped 
pro shop. 

The swimming area provides 
large dressing rooms and 
showers, mats and lawn chairs 
for all sun gods and god- 
desses, two diving boards for 
the adventurous types, and a 
snack bar. 



The tennis courts seem to 
be the best place to find 
"love" whether you like to play 
doubles or not. 

The golf course is laid out all 
around the beautifully- 
landscaped complex. There is 
always someone willing to go 
hit a few golf balls. 

The party Pavillion is a great 
place to have get togethers, 
exchanges, and wild times. 
The SGA, SAB, Greeks, and 
many other organizations have 
held numerous dances, 
movies, and pep rallies there. 

The Pro Shop is equipped 
with what any sport lover 
needs from a towel, beach ball 



or swimsuit, to a racket or 
club. Plus, the workers are 
always willing to help and 
make their customers happy. 

The snack bar has chips, 
drinks, hamburgers, hotdogs, 
nachos, etc... that will satisfy 
any appetite. Any variable 
meal ticket can be used. 

The Rec is impressive, 
spectacular and diverse - so 
different from many 
recreational facilities. No 
special skill or expertise is 
needed for having a good time 
at the complex. It is here for 
the enjoyment of the students 
and the public, and is a great 
place to meet people. 



Several events each year make 
Natchitoches one of Louisiana's 
most charming and interesting 
cities. 

The premier event in northwest 
Louisiana is the Christmas Festival, 
held on the first Saturday of 
December. The festival annually 
draws in excess of 125,000 
spectators to Natchitoches. Food, 
crafts, music, and a large parade 
make up the day's activities, while a 
beautiful fireworks exhibition is held 
at dusk on the riverfront. 

After the festival, the Student 



Activities Board at 
sponsors a big-name ( 
Coliseum. Past acts 
the Commodores, Ro 
and Hall and Oates. 

The Natchitoches 
which will be held n 
another big attraction 
a three-state area con 
NSU campus for th 
salute to Louisiana folk! 

In addition to thea 
events, several smalleij 
held in the Natch! 
throughout the year. 



Northwestern Has Its 
Own Ghost Story 



One of the most interesting of Nor- 
thwestern's many traditions is the story of 
Isabella, the tale of NSU's residence 
ghost. 

Legend has it that a young girl in the 
1880's was separated from her lover. 
Upon hearing news of his death, she 
joined the convent. Details were in- 
correct, however, and he returned to 
Natchitoches. 

Isabella was a nun; men were for- 
bidden. She could not bear this, and 
stuck a dagger through her heart. As she 

Inside View 
1984 

July 8,9,10 
July 15,16,17 



r 



died, she left a bloody handprint in the 
attic of East Hall, which was one of the 
first buildings at the Louisiana State 
Normal School. 

East was destroyed several years later, 
and Caldwell was built nearby. Isabella's 
ghost is said to have roamed the halls of 
both Caldwell and girls' dorms for many 
years. Many a Normal coed had either 
seen or heard Isabella. 

When Caldwell Hall was destroyed in a 
tragic fire in 1982, the students of 
Northwestern "moved" her to the Old 
Women's Gym near Varnado Hall. 
Isabella has not been heard from since 
the fire, however. 

Plans are on the drawing board for the 
rebuilding of Caldwell Hall. The new 
Caldwell will have the old building's gothic 
architecture, but will be modern inside. 
Will Isabella come back to her old 
haunting grounds? Only time will tell 




The destruction of Caldwell Hall in October, 1982. 
the ome of the ghost Isabella. 



CE 



Vol. 73, No. 2 



Spotlight 



ois Guide to Northwestern 




id 



d at 
name ( 
t acts 
as, Ro 
tes. 
ches 
held n 
iction 
ea cor 
for th 
na folk 
d thes 
smalla 
NatcM 
'ear. 



Painted windows at the Union during the Christmas Festival 




Kate Fair Brings Excitement 



[he Louisiana State Fair, 
most north Louisianans, 
something special. It's 

3n more special for 

tents at Northwestern and 

[Jisiana Tech. 

he Fair annually hosts the 
Ite Fair Classic football 

ne, which the two schools 
ticipate in. For 78 years, 

State Fair has been the 
ItballgameatNSU. 



Activities prevail during the 
week prior to the game. The 
State Fair Court is selected to 
represent NSU at the game, 
and the "Burning of the 
Bulldog" is a big attraction. 

Even the student govern- 
ments get into the act. Since 
1977, when the SGA grudge 
match was started, NSU has 
prevailed. 

Other events, such as the 



midnight breakfast at Iberville 
and various contests, are also 
held during the week, which 
culminates in Shreveport's 
Independence Stadium on 
Saturday night. All day 
Saturday, the infamous "Rally 
in the Alley" is held in 
downtown's Shreve Square in 
downtown. Fans from both 
NSU and Tech get together 
for contests, music, and a little 
fun. 




State Fair: The Demons Tackle Tech 



Getting to Know the '84 Insiders 




nonths ago, 10 Northwestern 
jwere selected by a committee 
gjof University personnel to serve 
W s f or the 1984 Inside View 

forty students applied for the ten 

■ and according to committee 

Tandy Pierce, "the decision was 

Bn. Many good students applied 
tiers." 

jjys and six girls were selected 
P Positions. A brief sketch of 
er is listed below: 
er sull is a sophomore from 
where he graduated from Ovey 
,™gh School. At NSU, he is a 
i° f Kappa Alpha Order, and 
,er ves as KA's social chairman. 
,-' v ed the NSU Academic 
P test fall, and was elected as 
ease senator. 

| ■ Gunter is a junior music 
0cal major from Baton Rouge. 

— » 9rad uate of Broadmoor High 

:ll wa£f r ® s ne had the lead in several 
n '9h school, her choir travelled 



to Belgium to represent to the USA in a 
world competition. She attended LSU-A 
her freshman year, and since her arrival at 
NSU, she has joined Sigma Kappa 
sorority, Current Sauce, and Student 
Ambassadors. 

Melissa Hightower hails from 
Lafayette, where she graduated from St. 
Thomas More High School. She received 
many honors in high school, and has 
continued doing so at NSU. Melissa is a 
member of Sigma Kappa sorority and 
Student Ambassadors and is a varsity 
cheerleader. She received the NSU 
Academic Scholarship and several others 
to attend Northwestern as an education 
major. 

Jim Martin is a resident of Nat- 
chitoches, where he graduated from St. 
Mary's High School. He is a business 
major, and is a member of Kappa Alpha 
Order. In April, Jim served as chairman of 
the highly-successful KA Boxing Tour- 
nament for MD, which raised several 
thousand dollars. He is a member of 
BSU, and loves outdoor sports. 



Cammy McClary hails from Metairie, 
where she attended Grace King High 
School, where she was active in several 
clubs and organizations. Cammy is a 
charter member of Student Am- 
bassadors, and is active in Phi Mu 
sorority. She is also active in Panhellenic. 

Christi Moore grew up with Nor- 
thwestern, since her mother is a member 
of the NSU staff. Christi is a graduate of 
Natchitoches Central, where she was 
graduated with a 4.0 grade point 
average. At NSU, Christi is a member of 
Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority. 

Kim Nolde is a sophomore business 
major from Leesville, and she graduated 
from Leesville High School. She is 
secretary of Student Ambassadors, 
Northwestern's student recruiting group. 
Kim returned to NSU last fall after a brief 
absence. She likes sports, and she 
enjoys having a good time with friends. 

John Ramsey is a sophomore jour- 
nalism major from Baton Rouge, where he 



graduated from Broadmoor High School. 
In high school, he was SGA president and 
newspaper editor. Since coming to 
Northwestern last fall, John has been 
named as the 1984-85 Current Sauce 
Editor. He is a member of Kappa Sigma 
fraternity, and serves as their fall rush 
chairman. He is also active in the 1984 
Reagan/Bush campaign. 

Beth Sandiford is a junior elementary 
education major from Florien. She at- 
tended Florien High, and was runner-up 
to "Miss Florien." She is active in Sigma 
Kappa sorority, where she serves as 
secretary. Beth is a member of Purple 
Jackets, and is active in Student Am- 
bassadors. 

Bubba Soileau claims Opelousas as 
home. He graduated from Amy Bradford 
Ware High School, where he was active 
in several groups. Bubba is an active 
member of Kappa Sigma fraternity, and 
has worked for KNWD-FM. He is a 
member of Student Ambassadors, and is 
a senior mass communications major. 



June 26, 1984 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Vol. 73, No. 2 



6 Sports 

Demons Looking Good in '84 



by Steve Roe 

Contributing Writer 

Playing for a conference 
championship for the first time 
in over 10 years, Nor- 
thwestern will match it's 
returning experience against 
one of the more difficult 
schedules in recent years. 

The Demons must open the 
season with two roads games 
and end the year with three 
straight on the road, including 
a late season contest against 
Division I power Southern 
Mississippi. The Demons will 
host just four games in Turpin 
Stadium in 1 984. 

Northwestern will be 
competing for the first Gulf 
Star Conference cham- 
pionship as Sam Goodwin and 
his staff begin their second 
year with the Demon program. 
And according to Goodwin, all 
stages in the program are 
ahead of a year ago. 

"The first year is the 
toughest," said Goodwin. 
"You are trying to learn the 
players and they're trying to 
get to know the coaches. We 
had a much better spring as 
far as getting things done and 
the attitude has been great. 
We hope that will carry over 
this fall." 

What Goodwin also hopes 
will carry over is a three-game 
winning streak the Demons 
hold after ending 1 983 on 



"The first year is the 
toughest "-Sam Goodwin 



solid ground. Those three 
wins came against Louisiana 
opponents, two of which were 
ranked nationally at the time. 
The 13-9 win over Northeast 
also kept the Indians out of the 
l-AA playoffs. 

"Our first two games are 
important in that we come out 
of those with the confidence 
we need for the rest of the 
season," stated Goodwin. 
"Plus we will have two road 
games under our belt. The 
schedule is tough in that we 
play most of our Louisiana 
rivals on the road, plus Angelo 
State is a good team and 
Southern Mississippi is 
probably the best we play." 

With 10 starters returning 
on offense and six on 
defense, Goodwin feels his 
team will be better off in 
September of 1 984 that it was 



last season. "So many things 
happened to start last season, 
our minds weren't on football," 
remembers Goodwin. "That's 
why this season we need to 
get off to a good start and get 
things rolling in the right 
direction." 

Goodwin hopes his ex- 
perienced offensive unit will 
make it easier in getting 
started. Only the tightend 
does not return from a year 
ago as the Demons received a 
bonus when center Rickey 




Ainsworth was granted an 
extra year of eligibility. "We 
have five three-year starters 
up front," notes Goodwin. "I 
look for that to show in an 
improved running attack." 

While the offensive front is 
experienced, the coaching 
staff was also pleased with the 
spring progress made by the 
second unit. "We feel we have 
some backups that are ready 
to play," said Goodwin. 

Taking the snaps from 
Ainsworth will be junior 
quarterback Wayne Van, who 
has taken over sole 
possession of the leadership 
position. After throwing for 
over 1 ,200 yards a year ago, 
Van has taken control of the 
offense. 

"Wayne now knows what 
we are looking for from him 
and the offense," added 
Goodwin. "Last season he 
was confused at times and 
never settled down until late in 
the season. He has made a 
world of progress and has 
taken control." 

The running backs still lack a 
lot of experience but several 
players return and the depth is 
much better than a year ago. 
Fullback Frank Graham returns 
as a starter and Chris Chenier, 



Elliot Dawson, and Mike 
Walker all played well in the 
Spring at the tailback position. 

The wide receivers return in 
Mark Johnson and David 
Groman, but Groman has 
some catching up to do after 
missing spring drills. Roy 
Fontenot also returns and the 
Demons will also be able to 
use sophomore Odessa 
Turner, who at 6-3, 200- 
pounds, is a great target and a 
game-breaker. 

Goodwin has three players 
fighting for the tightend spot, 
led by Joe Trotter, who saw 
some action at the end of last 
season. "Tightend is a key for 
us in fall drills," admits 
Goodwin. "We have to have 
someone at that position show 
us he is ready to do the job." 

On defense the Demons 
won't be the biggest in the 
world, but they will be 
aggressive. "I think our 
defense is an aggressive one 
that will chase the football and 
not give up the big play," said 
Goodwin. "Our main concern 
with defense is if we can stay 
on the field and not be pushed 
around by a real physical 
football team." 

The front line is anchored by 
tackle Arthur "Tank" Berry 
and Bryan Arceneaux, while 



"I look for it (the GSC) to 
be very balanced. A number 
of teams could win it." 



end James Hall played well at 
the end of last season. 

The outside linebackers 
return in seniors Larry 
Robinson and Corris Boyd, 
and Goodwin feels he has 
three more just as good in 
Raymond Thompkins, An- 
thony Jackson, and Chiquita 
Thomas. 

On the inside Freddy Smith 
and Earnest Crittenden are a 
pair of sophomores who saw 
plenty of action a year ago. 
Size is Goodwin's major 
concern, while depth also 



must be developed with the 
likes of Gene Strogen, Keith 
Childress, and converted 
running back Greg Moore. 

Goodwin feels his starting 
secondary may be the real 




strong point of the team. 
Cornerback Charles Fulton 
was underrated a year ago as 
a starter, says Goodwin, and 
Robert Moore started most of 
the 1983 season. Both are 
very steady with plenty of 
experience. 

Safety Michael Richardson 
is the real key. The senior 
earned All-American honors a 
year ago by tying a national 
record with five pass in- 
terceptions in a t3-7 upset 
win over Southeastern. 



Richardson also set a national 
record with 1 27 return yards 
in that game, going 97 yards 
for the winning touchdown late 
in the third period. 

The Demons have three of 
five conference games at 
home and last year were 2-2 
against what are now GSC 
teams. Three of those four 
games were decided in the 
final minute of play. 

"I think our kids are hungry 
for the chance to play in the 
conference, to play for 
something," added Goodwin. 
"The older guys have talked 
about it and it will mean 
something to them. I think any 
of a number of teams could 
win the league; I look for it to 
be very balanced." 

A year ago the Demons lost 
seven of their first eight 
games, including six in a row 
and five of those were by 
seven points or less. Goodwin 
hopes that with the added 
experience and a break here 
or there, the Demons might 
come out on top in some of 
those close games during the 
1 984 season. 



Wanted!!! 

A SPORTS EDITOR FOR THE SAUCE. 

For more information, call John Ramsey at 357- 
5456 M-F between 1-4 p.m. A $1,200 annual 
scholarship will be awarded. 

No experience necessary! 



ARE YOUR 
COLLEGE FINANCES IN 
CRITICAL CONDITION? 

Joining the Army Reserve can 
reduce your college costs. If you qual- 
ify, our Educational Assistance pro- 
gram will pay up to $ 1 ,000 a year 
of your tuition for four years. 

If you have taken out a National 
Direct or Guaranteed Student Loan 
since October 1, 1975, our Loan 
Forgiveness program will repay 15% 
of your debt (up to $10,000) or $500, 
whichever is greater, for each year 
you serve. 

If you'd like to find out more 

about how a Reserve enlistment can 

help pay for college, call the number 

below. Or stop by. 

SS Harry Harrell 
U.S. Army Recruiting Station 
119 Royal Street, Natchitoches, LA 
357-8469 

"ASK ABOUT OUR BUDDY PLATOON" 

ARMY RESERVE. 
BE ALL YOU CAN BE. 



Vol. 73, No. 2 



CURRENT SAUCE 



June 26. 1984 



Sports 




GRADUATE STUDY 



IN CELL BIOLOGY, 
NEUROSCIENCE, 

DEVELOPMENT BIOLOGY, 
AND IMMUNOLOGY. 



■ 
1 

i 



Louisiana State University Medical 
Center in Shreveport offers 
graduate programs leading to either 
the Master of Science or Doctor of 
Philosophy Degree in the Depart- 
ment of Anatomy, annual stipends 
of $7200.00 with waiver of tuition 
fees are available to qualified 
students. 

For application forms and 
additional information contact Dr. 
John A. Beal, Coordinator of 
Graduate Studies, Department of 
anatomy, Louisiana State University 
School of Medicine. Shreveport, 
Louisiana 71130. 



Got Em! 

The Demons tackle 
Abilene Christian last 
season in a 20-17 loss to the 
'Cats. Northwestern opens 
the season against McNeese 
on Sept. 1 . 



HEED CASH? Earn $500 plus each school year. 
2 4 (flexible hours per week placing and filling 
posters on campus. Serious workers only; we 
give recommendations. Call now tor summer 
and next tall, I 800 243 6679 






m 




Be 
Immortal. 

If Mm could look into 
the eyes of Kenerations yet to 
conn;, you would Ik - there 
^PtNU£Hn make * difference. 
ByiiK&idji^be. 
American Cancer Society in 
your will, you can have a pow- 
erful effect on those who 
come after you. 

And leaving a legacy of 
life for others is a beautiful 
t way of living forever yourself. 

V AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY 

hx more uitontuutin eatt yuur 
lt«?t .'VCJi unit (« write tu the 
American (tinier V- . 
4\Vm .VSih St. New Writ, NV 10XWI. 

This space contributed as a pubic service 



7 



Seven Inducted Into 
Sports Hall of Fame 



Basketball record-breakers 
Pete Maravich and Bo Lamar, 
college and pro football great 
and Johnny Robinson and 
nationally-renowned jockey 
Eric Guerin were in Nat- 
chitoches over the weekend 
to be inducted into the 
Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame. 

They entered the shrine 
sponsored by the Louisiana 
Sports Writers Association 
along with Tech basketball 
star Jackie Moreland and 
Southern coaching legend 
Ace Mumford, who will be 
inducted posthumously. 
Mumford and Moreland will be 
represented at the 
ceremonies by members of 
their families. 

Filmed highlights from the 
careers of the seven in- 
ductees were shown during 
the dinner, and Maravich, 
Robinson, McGee, Lamar and 
Guerin each spoke briefly in 
response to their inductions. 

Another feature of the 
banquet was the presentation 
of the Distinguished Service 
Award in Sports Journalism to 
John Ferguson, long the radio 
voice of the LSU Tigers. 
Ferguson will become the first 
broadcast sports journalist to 
receive the honor from the 
LSWA. 



This year's honorees have 
perhaps the most impressive 
collective credential of any 
group inducted into the Hall of 
Fame since it was established 
in 1958. All seven gained 
national prominence on their 
way to membership in the 
shrine, which will grow to 94 
members with this year's 
induction. 

Maravich averaged 44.2 
points a game at LSU and is 
still the all-time national 
collegiate scoring leader. 

McGee, one of the most 
colorful of Vince Lombardi's 
great Green Bay Packers, 
scored the first Super Bowl 
touchdown. 

Robinson was a hard- 
running halfback on LSU's 
national championship team of 
1958. 

Lamar, second only to 
Maravich in national collegiate 
scoring for his career, was a 
three-time All-American at 
USL. 

Guerin rode for 35 years, 
winning more than 2,711 
races. 

Mumford won four national 
black championships during 
his 25 years as Southern's 
football coach. 

Moreland, nationally-known 
even as an All-American at 
Minden High, still ranks among 
the top three scorers in 
national high school history. 



Only 1 of 2 to achieve honor 

NSU Takes Two Titles 



Northwestern was one of 
only two schools to claim more 
than one championship during 
the 1983-84 year as the 
Demons placed fifth in the all- 
sports race in the Trans 
America Athletic Conference. 

Houston Baptist, which 
placed second in the overall 
standings, won three titles 
during the year, those in- 
cluding cross country, golf 



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and basketball. Centenary 
College, which did not win a 
single championship, did well 
enough in all sports to win its 
first ever Jesse C. Fletcher 
Award that goes to the all- 
sports winner. 

Northwestern won its first 
Trans-America championship 
ever when the rifle team 
claimed that title at the Mardi 
Gras Invitational at Nicholls 
State. The Demon tennis team 
then followed that by un- 
seeding defending champion 
Arkansas-Little Rock in that 
sport. 

Following Centenary and 
Houston Baptist in the team 
standings were Hardin- 
Simmons and Georgia State. 

Both Northwestern and 
Nicholls State have withdrawn 
from the Trans America 
Conference and will begin 
competition in the GSC this 
fall. 



June 26, 1984 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Vol. 73, No. 2 



8 



Viewpoint 



We're Getting There 

When I was named editor of the Sauce in March, I immediately 
drew up my plans for the next year. I envisioned the summer 
session as being a key part of my plans. Each of the three 
summer papers would change design, layout, and typestyles. I 
knew I may drive Ann at the Natchitoches Times crazy, but I also 
knew we needed a change. So far, I'm glad I did it. 

The first paper concentrated mainly on layout. We didn't 
utilize innovative layout, just plain basic design techniques. 
Now, we've established that we can run a good college 
publication. Soon, we'll try the neat stuff. 

This paper, we're still trying new ideas, but we're also sticking 
to the same basic format. A little more visual art and a new 
typestyle are the main changes for this paper. In two weeks, 
we'll try something new again. 

I knew the editorship would be a tough job, and to a certain 
extent it has. However, this University has some great people 
both as students and as staff members who have helped me 
tremendously, either with actual help or just with words of 
encouraqement. Without them, my job would be much harder. 

Robin Gunter and Darlene Winslow have stepped in this 
summer and done an excellent job. Mr. Presson, our summer 
advisor, has been in the shadows all summer offering his advice 
and opinions. They've really helped. 

NSU should be proud of its informational services. Both Jerry 
Pierce and Jim Johnson at the news bureau and Steve Roe in 
sports information have helped the Sauce in any way possible. 
Ditto to the crew at the Times. They've been great, too. 

Finally, two guys have given me untold amounts of advice and 
encouragement. In other words, they have been great friends. 
To Randy Pierce and Skip Waters, thanks! 

Two months ago, I thought it would take us at least until mid- 
fall semester to achieve parity with the state's other school 
newspapers; however, we've done it in just one issue. Current 
Sauce is not as large as some schools' papers, but it is just as 
good. And you know, it really feels good to say that. 
John Ramsey 

Editor 



GARFIELD® by Jim Davis 



/ GARFlELP, \ 


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Letter: A Salute to Dillard 



Dear Editor 

Rarely do we have the chance to be 
associated with a person of such stature as Dr. 
J.L. Dillard of the Depertment of Language 
Arts. I have been fortunate enough to be a 
student of, an employee of, and a friend of Dr. 
Dillard. 

I think that it's time that Northwestern took 
it's hat off and saluted Dr. Dillard. Often we 
take for granted the gifts that God has given us. 
One such gift is Dr. Dillard, a renowned author, 
linguist, teacher, and a real human being. He 
doesn't put on any fronts, because he doesn't 
have to. He is always himself, but that is 



enough. Dr. Dillard is well-informed in almost 
every scholarly area, as well as the practical 
areas. 

He knows how to teach, and he doesn't mind 
sharing his wealth of experience and in- 
formation with his students. His classes, even 
the three hour ones, are never boring. On the 
contrary, they are usually stimulating. The only 
problem we might possibly have sometimes is 
that he goes above our head for a second or 
two. But he doesn't use his brilliancy to make 
his students feel inadequate. He uses it to 
educate! 

Judy Paschall 



Letter: Yearbook Quality is Poor 



Dear Editor 

What has happened to the Potpourri? I am 
really disappointed in our yearbook. There are 
countless mistakes and poor layout throughout 
the book. On top of that, it's late! 

Starting with the title page, the yearbook is 
plain boring. There is very little color, and there 



is so much white space. On each Greek page, 
one-half of the page is blank. Couldn't that 
have been used for something else? 

Hopefully, the yearbook staff of '84-'85 will 
come up with a product we'll all be proud of. I 
mean really. The '84 book is good - for a small 
junior high school, nor a university. 

Leah Sherman 



Current Quotes 



Should the Legislature use state funds to "bail out" the World's Fair in 
New Orleans? 



Jon Robbins 
Senior 

"Yes. The Fair is bringing in 
a lot of money. Tourists are 
spending millions in the New 
Orleans area. It'll make the 
money back." 



Jon Mouser 
Senior 

"No. It's their own fault. 
The Fair shouldn't have their 
budget depend on drawing 
huge crowds." 



Dane Broussard 
Senior 

"Yes. Louisiana wanted the 
Fair. If we're not willing tc 
spend a little extra money or 
it, then we shouldn't have 
wanted it in the first place. 



Dr. Dean Johnson 
Professor of Sociology 

"Yes, it should be bailed 
out. I've been, and it's worth 
our support. It would be a 
black eye for Louisiana to let it 
go down the drain." 



Current Quotes II 



What are the best and 
Why? 

Mark Colton 
Senior 

"I like the architecture and 
design of the Fine Arts Center. 
It mixes the new and the old. 
The Intramural Building is the 
pits, though. It's old, and has 
thousands of bird nests in the 
rafters." 



worst buildings on the Northwestern campus? 



Darrell Hill 
Sophomore 

"Kyser is the best. All your 
classes are in one place, so 
you don't have to walk all over 
campus. Iberville has to be 
the worst. The food is just 
bad, and the building is not 
clean." 



Dr. Christine Ford 
Professor of English 

"I love the type that allows 
you to look out - the natural 
feeling - like the Business 
Building. The worst is Kyser. 
It's temperature is consistently 
uneven, and it's 'plastic' 
feeling." 



Anna Hill 
Graduate student 

"Fine Arts is the best 
building. It's new and up- 
dated. The Business Building 
is the worst - it's old and 
cumbersome." 



Current Sauce 



Staff 



John Ramsey 
Editor 

Robin J. Gunter 
News Editor 

Darlene Winslow 
Features/ 
Photography 

Franklin I. Presson 
Advisor 

Current Sauce is published 
every other Tuesday during the 
summer session by students of 
Northwestern State University 
of Louisiana. The paper is 
student-run and financed, and 
is not associated with any 
school or department. 

Editorial and business of- 
fices are located at 225A Kyser 
Hall. Office hours are 1-4 p.m. 
weekdays. 

All correspondence should 
be brought by the office or sent 
to Box 5306, NSU, Nat- 
chitoches, LA 71497. 
Deadline for pubication is the 
Thursday preceding Tuesday 
publication. 



Current Sauce 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 

NATCHITOCHES, LA 
VOL. 73, NO. 3 
JULY 10, 1984 



Folk Festival Set to Begin Friday 




Louisiana Education 

Clementine Hunter painted the limited edition print for the 1984 Folk Festival. The print 
deals with education, the general theme of the Fest. 



The fifth annual Nat- 
chitoches Folk Festival, 
recognized as one of the 
premier folk festivals in the 
South, is scheduled for Friday 
through Sunday in Prather 
Coliseum. 

Dedicated to the iden- 
tification, documentation and 
presentation of Louisiana's 
finest folk arts, the Festival will 
offer visitors from throughout 
the United States a multi- 
cultural program featuring 
more than 300 musicians, 
storytellers, cooks, dancers 
and traditional craftsmen. 

This year, to coincide with 
Northwestern 's 1 00th an- 
niversary, the Festival will 
focus on the history of 
education and attempt to 
acquaint the general public 
with the nature and potential of 
education in the future. 

An extensive, informative 
exhibit-similar to the festival's 
special recognition of the 
cotton, timber, oil and gas, 
and railway industries in past 
years-is being developed 
under the guidance of Mrs. 
Maxine Southerland, curator 
of the Center for the History of 
Louisiana Education. 



Inside View Holds Largest Session Ever 



by Robin Gunter 



News Editor 



Inside View began its largest 
session in the program's six- 
year history on Sunday, 
according to Barbara Gillis, 
coordinator. 

"We had over 1 80 incoming 
freshmen for our first 
session," she said. "That's 



mroe than we had for the 
grand total our first two 
years." 

The program began with the 
"Welcome to NSU," where 
the Insiders (student coun- 
selors) performed "You're the 
Demon Generation," a take-off 
of the "Pepsi Generation." 
The opening was highlight by 
Insider Bubba Soileau's 



starring role as Michael 
Jackson. Afterwards, Insider 
Robin Gunter performed "My 
Guy" to the Demon Mascot. 

Participants were welcomed 
by Dr. Joseph Orze, 
president; Joe Sampite, 
mayor; and Tod Klotzbach, 
SGA president. 

Intramurals were the feature 
point of the Half Niter, held on 



Good Movie? 

At least one Northwestern 
student has learned that the 
Union Addition is good for a 
quick between-class snooze 
in addition to movies and TV 
shows. 




the ROTC field. Melissa 
Hightower and Jim Martin's 
groups won first and second, 
respectively. The scheduled 
Rec Complex swim party was 
cancelled because of light- 
ning. 

Academics were em- 
phasized on Monday. 
Students were advised and 
attended a brief introduction to 
their senior college. 

The Organizational Pot- 
pourri, featuring student life, 
was held in the Ballroom 
Monday afternoon . Several 
campus organizations par- 
ticipated. The Caberet, with a 
dance afterwards, capped off 
the day. 

Students pre-registered for 
classes on Tuesday. The 
program concluded with the 
farewell session at 1 2:00. 

Inside View's next session 
begins Sunday afternoon, and 
will run through Tuesday. 
Approximately 1 50 students 
are expected to attend 
session two. 



This year's education exhibit 
will include such components 
as early classroom and lun- 
chroom scenes with 
demonstrations and activities 
performed by children and 
adults dressed in costumes 
from the 1 900 era. 

Sessions for the Nat- 
chitoches Folk Festival are the 
Friday night music show from 
8-1 1 p.m., the Saturday 
daytime program from 10 
a.m. -6 p.m., the Saturday 
night music show from 8- 
1 1 :30 p.m. and the Sunday 
daytime program from 1 1 
a.m. -6 p.m. 

"What we offer people who 
come to the Natchitoches Folk 
Festival is a total Louisiana 
heritage experience," said 
festival director Dr. Donald W. 
Hatlev. 

"Our foods," he said, "from 
boudin to jambalaya to 
seafoods to Afro-American 
and traditional American are 
cultural experiences in 
themselves. We offer foods 
that are characteristic of this 
particular region to give 
people a sense of what it is 
like to live here." 

"Musically,'' added Hatley, 
"our stage programs are 
representative of the 
geographical areas of 
Louisiana, such as the 
Acadiana region, New 
Orleans, North Louisiana and 
Baton Rouge. Plus, we go into 
our own region to let people 
hear the sounds of our gospel, 
family reunion and other types 
of music." 

Another major area of the 
Natchitoches Folk Festival is 
its crafts program, which is 
extremely strong in terms of 
geographical representation. 

"The variety and quality of 
the crafts and craftsmen we 
present have truly made the 
Festival a statewide event," 
said Hatley. 

Many of the master craft- 
smen may be seen working 
with young people in the 
festival's children's area. "We 
take crafts people who are 
very comfortable working with 
children and give the children 
close hands-on experiences 
with the craftsmen. These 
children have an opportunity 
to touch and make things 
themselves. We try very hard 
to involve the kids in our 
program." 



July 10, 1984 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Vol. 73, No. 3 



2 



News 



Reservations at '83 Level 



Varnado Fills First 



by John Ramsey 



T57I57 



Varnado Hall is the first 
dormitory on campus to fill up 
for the fall semester. 

According to Mickie 
Townsen, director of housing, 
all of Varnado's 194 spaces 
have been reserved. Also 
nearing full capacity are 
Louisiana and Natchitoches 
halls, which hold 1 80 and 200 
students, respectively. 

As of last Monday, 1,053 
housing reservations had 
been received for NSU's six 
dorms (five on the Nat- 
chitoches campus and 
Warrington Place in 
Shreveport). 

In the fall of 1983 nearly 
1 ,350 students resided on 
campus, and Townsend 
expects a similar number this 
fall. "Our count right now is 
just about where we were at 
this time last year. They come 
rolling in during the month of 
August, and we will pick up 
several at Inside View." 

The south wing of Rapides 
Hall is full, and the east wing is 
"almost full," said Townsend. 
"The first floor of East Rapides 
will be graduate students, but 
all of the other floors are 
undergraduate," said 
Townsend. She expects to 
use at least two of West 
Rapides' four floors. Rapides' 
total capacity is 600. 

Only two of the four floors in 
each wing of Sabine Hall will 
probably be used, said 
Townsend. "We're making 
sure that we fill girls' slots in 
Louisiana, Natchitoches, and 
Varnado before we move onto 
the Sabine third floor. That 
way, we won't have to move 
students off that floor like we 
did in the spring." Capacity at 
Sabine Hall is 750 making one 
of the state's largest dorms. 

Townsend attributed 
Louisiana's sudden popularity 
to the fact that the band and 
music departments have been 
promoting the dorm because 
of its location to the A. A. 
Fredericks Center. "We have 
a lot of musicians residing in 
Louisiana for the fall," she 
said. Also, this is the first year 
that Louisiana Hall has offered 
private rooms. 

The Warrington campus 
dormitory holds 1 08 students. 
Townsend expexts this facility 
to be at capacity this fail. "We 
usually have a waiting list for 
Warrington," she said. "This 
year should be no different." 

For the fall, the dorm fee has 
been increased from $370 to 



$410. This increase was 
approved by the Board of 
Trustees several weeks ago. 

"These higher prices for 
dorm rent are due to higher 
utility costs, the big rise in 
telephone bills because of the 
Bell System breakup, and 
declining enrollment," said 
Townsend. "I don't think it will 
hurt our dorm count though. 
When prices go up, so does 
student financial aid, and many 
of our dorm residents have 
some type of aid." 

Townsend also commented 
on student complaints about 
NSU dorms. "We have the 
same problems as any other 
school. I'll put our dorms 
against anyone else's. And 
another thing - ours are the 
cleanest." 

"I've seen dorms at every 
school in the state," she said. 
"Half of Louisiana Tech's 
dorms are not air conditioned, 
Nicholls has iron bars on the 
windows, USL has some that 
should be condemned, and 
LSU has several fancy ones, 
but the majority of theirs are 
not. Students don't realize our 
dorms are not as bad as some 
other stundets would have 
them believe." 

In other recent dorms 
developments, Caddo Hall 
was transferred to Louisiana 
School on July 1 .West 
Caspari Hall will follow 
sometime this year. 




Excuse me, ma'am 

Bonnie Lawson, a member of Frank Presson's Public 
Relations 420 class, surveys Wal-Mart shoppers in Mansfield 
last weekend on the area-wide impact of the Natchitoches 
Folk Festival. 



Regents: Not Too Many Schools 



The Board of Regents 
released a report recently 
showing that there are 
43,322 college-age citizens 
per public college in Louisiana 
which makes the state rank 
48th out of 50, in comparison 
to the number of higher 
education institutions in the 
other states. Variables used in 
the analysis include total 
population, college-age 
population (15-24) and total 
land area measured in square 
miles. 

In Louisiana, there are 
700,983 citizens per public 
two year college. This ratio 
places Louisiana 49th out of 
50 states in terms of number 
of residents per two-year 
college. When Bossier Parish 
Community College and St. 
Bernard Parish Community 
College are removed form the 
analysis because neither is 
funded through the Board of 
Regents' state appropriation 



formula, nor governed by a 
higher education board, 
Louisiana then ranks 50 out of 
50. 

When Louisiana's public 
institutions are compared with 
other states based on total 
population, Louisiana ranks 
49th out of 50 in the number 
of two year institutions, 19th 
out of 50 in four-year and 
45th out of 50 when all public 
colleges and universities are 
analyzed. 

"Although the size of the 
population served is a critical 
factor in determining whether 
a state has an adequate 
system of higher education," 
Arceneaux said, "the size of 
the state is another important 
variable." As an example, he 
explained that a small state 
with a large population needs 
more institution than a small 
state with a small population, 
in square miles per public two- 



year college. 

With 3,466 square miles 
per public four-year institution, 
Louisiana ranks 20th out of 50 
with 2,426 square miles per 
public college. If the two local 
community colleges are 
removed from the analysis, 
Louisiana ranks 33rd out of 30 
with 2,696 square miles per 
public institution. 

"When Louisiana is com- 
pared with other states based 
on the number of total square 
miles per public college or 
university, it ranks 40th out of 
50 at the two-year level, 20th 
out of 50 at the four-year level 
and 30th out of 50 overall," 
Arceneaux commented. 
"These figures clearly indicate 
that we do not have too many 
colleges and universities in 
Louisiana in comparison to the 
other 49 states." 

"In fact, we have what might 
be considered an adequate 
number," he said. 




HILLS SYMPOSIUM 
SET FOR FRIDAY 
SYMPOSIUM 

The secona annual Hill's 
Symposium for small animal 
owners, veterinarians and 
veterinary technicians will 
be conducted Friday, in 
Williamson Hall. 

The symposium, which 
focuses on the nutritional 
needs of dogs and cats, is 
being sponsored by the 
Department of Agriculture 
and Animal Science's 
veterinary technology 
program in cooperation with 
Hill's Pet Products of 
Topeka, Kan 

Sessions include a 
lecture program from 9 
a.m. to noon for dog and 
cat owners, veterinarians 
and veterinary technicians. 

For additional information 
about the second annual 
Hill's Symposium, call 357- 
5912. 

NSU PROFS 
AID LOCAL 
INDIANS 

Two professors at 
Northwestern have 
published a report 
documenting their efforts to 
train selected represen- 
tatives of four Louisiana 
Indian tribal groups to 
deliver mental health 
services to people within 
native American com- 
munities. 

Entitled, Training Native 
Americans to Deliver 
Mental Health Services to 
Their Own People, the 
report was published 
recently in the special 
populations section of 
Counselor Education and 
Supervision, the quarterly 
publication of the American 
Association for Counseling 
and Development. 

Authors of the report are 
Dr. Keith Runion, associate 
professor and chairman of 
the counseling and 
guidance division, and Dr. 
Hiram F. Gregory Jr., 
curator of Williamson 
Museum and professor of 
anthropology. 



Vol. 73, No. 3 



Features 



CURRENT SAUCE 



July 10, 1984 



3 




Say What? 



Pictured as a scene from Huck and Jim on the Mississippi. 
Starring in the play are Steve Thomas (sitting), Vince 
Williams and Jim Ford, Jr. (standing) and Dale Higgin- 
botham. 



Bailey Promoted As 
New Graduate Dean 



Dr. Orze recently an- 
nounced the promotion of Dr. 
Mildred Bailey from chairman 
of the Department of 
Education to dean of the 
College of Graduate Studies 
and Research. 

Orze said the promotion, 
which was approved recently 
by the Board of Trustees, will 
become effective on Aug. 1. 
She succeeds Dr. Donald M. 
Rawson, who is retiring this 
summer after 24 years at 
NSU, including the last four 



years as Graduate School 
Dean. 

A faculty member at Nor- 
thwestern since 1963, Bailey 
has served the past year as 
professor and head of the 
Department of Education for 
seven years. 

It was under Bailey's 
direction that Northwestern's 
graduate program in reading 
was initiated in 1 966. The first 
master's degree in reading in 
Louisiana was awarded by 
NSU in 1967. _ 

4nc^ * 



'Huck and Jim 9 Begins Run 



Huck and Jim on the 
Mississippi," the enchanting 
new musical with book and 
lyrics by Joshua Logan and 
music by Bruce Pomahac, 
began its premier season 
Friday, at the Grand Ecore 
Amphitheatre. 

Based on Mark Twain's The 
Adventures of Huckleberry 
Finn,;" the outdoor production 
will be presented for 1 2 more 
performances this summer. 
The shows are at 8:15 p.m. 
on July 12-14, 19-21, 26-28 
and Aug. 2-4. 

Huck and Jim, which will 
appeal to all age groups, is 
being produced and directed 
by Logan in cooperation with 
Northwestern, the Louisiana 
Outdoor Drama Association 
and the Louisiana School. 

General admission tickets 
are $8 for adults, $6 for 
students and senior citizens, 



and $4 for children 12 years 
and under. Tickets may be 
reserved by calling 357- 
6169. 

Huck and Jim is like most 
good movies and good plays," 
says associate producer Dr. 
William Hunt, chariman of the 
Department of Theatre and 
Media Arts. "It has elements 
that will appeal to the adult 
audience and elements that 
will appeal to the very young." 

A complete rewrite of an 
earlier version of Huck and Jim 
which was produced last year 
at Florida Atlantic University, 
this production offers "lots of 
action, lots of fun and good, 
lively music," stated Hunt. 

The cast of some 50 people 
are wearing multi-colored, 
multi-layered costumes of the 
early 1800s which were 
designed by Beverly Jane 
Thomas. 

"The costumes are very rich 



TEACH Evaluated 



An evaluation of Project 
TEACH, the innovative pilot 
program conducted in the past 
academic year to recruit 
capable high school graduates 
into teacher educaton studies, 
concludes that the program 
should be continued and also 
expanded to include more 
students 

The program-sponsored by 
Northwestern, the Central 
Louisiana Professional 
Development Center, and the 
State Department of 
Education in cooperation with 
the public school systems in 
four parishes-was considered 
unique because it provided an 
opportunity for selected high 
school seniors to have 
positive encounters with 
outstanding teachers and 
teaching experiences prior to 



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graduation from high school. 

"The most positive aspect 
of the program was listed as 
the fact that it recruited good 
teachers," stated project co- 
director Dottie Pinckard, 
director of the Central 
Louisiana PDC 

"Other positive comments," 
she said, "included the 
awareness aspect of the 
program; that is, it served to 
show students what teaching 
is really like." 

Pinckard said approximately 
1 75 seniors representing high 
schools in Red River, Sabine, 
Vernon and Winn Parishes 
were involved in Project 
TEACH durina the vear. 

"Several students were 
evidently converted to 
majoring in education from 
other fields of academic in- 
terest," stated Pinckard. "One 
cooperating teacher named 
six students who changed 
their career preference to 
education as a result of this 
program. One student even 
changed his plans to not 
attend college to plans to 
attend and to major in 
education." 

Pinckard said the evaluation 
gave superior marks for 
project coordination between 
the local school systems and 
NSU. 



looking, and there are a 
number of costume changes 
in the production," said Hunt. 

Hunt, who is also president 
of LODA, said the adult 
audience will enjoy seeing the 
character development of a 
young man, Huck Finn, who is 
being portrayed alternately by 
Steve Thomas and Chris Gray. 

Ernest Hemingway 
described Huck Finn as a 
"displace waif, a liar and thief 
on occasion, and a casual 
rebel against respectability. 
But on the day he encounters 
another fugitive from trouble, a 
runaway slave named Jim, he 
also finds, for the first time in 
his life, love, acceptance and a 
sense of responsibility." 

In Jim, the older people in 
the audience will applaud a 
man's efforts to return to his 
family and regain his own 
integrity. 

For young people, Huck and 
Jim will provide fun-filled 
action and lively music, along 
with choreographed 
movements to illustrate and 
heighten the lyrics and music 
of the show's 28 musical 
numbers. 

The principals in Huck and 
Jim, in addition to Thomas and 
Gray, are Lil Taylor as the 
Widow Douglas and Granny 
Hump; Vince Williams as Jim; 
Dale Higginbotham as Pastor 
Bunyan and the Duke; Bucky 
Lee Britt as Pap; Mike 
Bourgeois and Jack Dowdell 
as Pap's Chronies; Jim Ford 
Sr. as the King; Molly Thorn- 
ton as Mary Janes Wilkes; and 
Elizabeth Corley, Sally Moody, 
Jane Napier, Rachal Poole and 
Molly Thornton. 

Members of the musical's 
ensemble are Denise Airhart, 
San Allen, Thomas Ballard, 
Candace Basco, Dawn Basco, 
Jason Basco, Paulette Basco, 
Debbie Bernard, Molly Ber- 
nard, Mike Bourgeois, 
Amanda Bryant, Bob 
Burkhead, Elizabeth Corley, 
Jack Dowdell, Sally Moody, 
Jane Napier, Rachal Poole, 
Louis Rue, Bucky Lee Britt, 
Molly Thornton and Gene 
Williams. 

The production staff in- 
cludes Michael Atkins, scenic 
design; Stephanie Lynn Ryals, 
lighting design; Drew Moore, 
sound design; Steve Wells, 
musical director; Chris 
Louisell, choreographer; Keith 
Woods, production stage 
manager; Ray Schexnider, 
associate director, and Pat 
Waddle, wardrobe mistress. 



4/5 




aL| 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 



in m 






Traditions Continue 

Old family traditions such as basket-weaving, quiltmaking, etc. still exist at 
the Folk Festival. 



July 10, 1984 



Education Cn 
1984Festivan 



Children shooting marbles, jumping rope 
and playing hopscotch on the playground, 
eating their lunches from tin boxes on the 
lawn, and learning from the McGuffey 
Reader and Blue Back Speller in a typical 
classroom setting of the early 1 900s. 

These are just a few of the activities and 
scenes that visitors will see when they view 
the extensive, informative education exhibit 
at the 1984 Folk Festival. 

Education was selected as the theme of 
the fifth annual Festival because of its im- 
portance to the transfer of information and 
knowledge from one generation to another, 
regardless of the setting. 

"Whether that transfer takes place in the 
classroom, with the teacher passing in- 
formation on to children, or under the oak 
tree, where the old deer hide-tanner might 
be passing knowledge of tanning down to 
his son or grandson, education is learning 
and represents the passing of a true art form 
from one generation to another," says 
Festival director Dr. Donald W. Hatley. 

The education exhibit for the Festival is 
being developed by Maxine Southerland, 
curator of the Center for the History of 
Louisiana Education. It will be more 



$he I 
tton, I 
aes 
e will 
fte the 
^rland. 
will be 
if whE 
^room 
i educ 
t settii 
J and 
(jitic c 
I 

the te 

8, Will 

I as 
jiiopscc 
Bene f 
c lunch 

und« 
cene \ 
c-ouisia 
ds; the 

II evoli 
t» Blue 
juggies 
(ftation: 
rcand< 



Festival Offers Many Ethnic Spec 




From Cajun jambalaya to Filipino lumpias 
to Italian meatball sandwiches to the famous 
Cane River meat pies, the ethnic foods of 
the 1 984 Natchitoches Folk Festival will be 
cultural experiences in themselves. 

"What we offer people who come to the 
Natchitoches Folk Festival is a total 
Louisiana heritage experience," says 
Festival director Dr. Donald W. Hatley, 
professor of English and head of the 
Louisiana Folklife Center. "One of the best 
things we do is serve a variety of foods that 
is characteristic of this particular region." 

During the Festival's daytime programs on 
Saturday and Sunday, cooks representing 



NaTCHiTOCHeS 
FOLK FeSTiVaL 



many different cultures will be serving their 
southern, soul, Cane River, Cajun, Anglo- 
American, Italian, Coushatta Indian, Creole, 
Afro-American and traditional Louisiana 
foods. 

Each of the Festival's 14 food booths 
located in the concourses of the coliseum 
will have several different food items in 
small, inexpensive portions for sell to 
visitors. Complete lunches and dinners will 
also be available. 

"To experience the foodways of this 
region's rich folk culture," explains Hatley, 
"people should try to sample food items 
from each of our food booths. This is one 
way to fully appreciate the diversity of 
northwest Louisiana." 

The following is a list of booth sponsors 
and the foods they will be serving Saturday, 
from 1 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday, from 1 1 



a.m. to 6 p.m.: 

•Grayson Barbecue-Pecan Pies, Chip 
Beef Sandwiches, Single Ribs and Smoked 
Sausage. 

•Asbury Methodist Church-Red Beans & 
Rice, Barbecue Chicken, Neck Bones & 
Rice, Sweet Potato Pie, Potato Salad and 
Corn on the Cob. 

•Lasyone Meat Pie Kitchen-Meat Pies, 
Red Beans, Rice & Sausage, Dirty Rice and 
Cane River Cream Pie. 

•Sidney P. Landry Jr. -Cajun Boudin, 
Cajun Sausage on a Stick, Cajun Cracklins 
and Cajun Hot Dogs. 

•Theta Chi-French Doughnuts, Shish-ka- 
bob, Rossettes, Fruit-ka-bob, Fruit Marinade 
and Fruit Tarts. 

•Frank Piccolo Family-Italian Sausage 
Sandwiches, Italian Meatball Sandwiches 
and Italian Muffalatta Sandwiches. 



• RcSeafc 
Louisas and 

• Slrtaurai 
Seafofmp | 

Oyste 

• Cfry e 

Recipfa Indi 
and I** 

• Of'sh 

Catfis* Hush 
Cole: 

•Sialic 
Tamal 

• pfilipinc 
rolls),? no 
Teriyf le d W 

• St )ri cal ; 

River j R ice, 
Cake!. 

• D^anaj £ 



Vol. 73, No. 3 



Spotlight 



Cn As 
fame 



«he Festival's previous 
iton, timber, oil and gas, 
■96. 

m will be able to relive the 
ae the education exhibit," 
^rland. "Hopefully, the 
ivill become more aware 
Jf what it was like to be 
foom in the old days." 
f education exhibit will be 
t setting from the early 
i and children will be 
ijitic costumes represen- 
t. 

{he teacher's supervision 
8, will participate in such 
s as shooting marbles, 
jjopscotch. There will also 
ttene from the past when 
lunches from tin boxes 
iq under the shade tree, 
cene will include displays 
Louisiana schools from as 
ds; the famous McGuffey 
l> evolution of the speller, 
t» Blue Back Speller; the 
(Uggies, and other modes 
(ftation; and such subject 
iC and general sciences. 



• Rc Seafood Market- 
ouisies and Fried Catfish. 

• Stttaurant-Louisiana 
leafoPmp Po-Boys and 
)yste 

•Ofry Bread & Jam, 
^ecip ta Indian Fry Bread 
tnd 

•(/eh Kitchen-Fried 
JatfiS Hush-Puppies and 
)olel 



Carters Highlight 
'84 Entertainment 

The legendary Carter Family of Nashville, former 
Louisiana governor Jimmie Davis and Cajun fiddler Hadley 
Castille headline the nighttime music shows of this 
summer's Natchitoches Folk Festival. 

The pure country music of the Carter Family, a 
nationally-known group that features two daughters of the 
late Maybelle Carter, will perform with the East Texas 
String Band and Hadley Castille and the Cajun Grass Band 
on the Saturday Night Music Show from 8 p.m. to 1 1 :30 
p.m. on Saturday. 

The Friday night music show from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. will 
be highlighted by the country and progressive gospel 
music of former governor Jimmie Davis. Performing on the 
same program will be the Central Louisiana Dixieland Band 
and Beausoliel, one of the finest traditional Cajun dance 
bands in the state. 

The Carter Family, which has earned the title of "the 
first family of country music," began the pure country 
musical tradition over 50 years ago. Maybelle and the 
other original Carter Family members frequently performed 
in front of general stores, on the squares and in the 
backyard communities of north Louisiana. 

Hadley Castille, whose Cajun "Grass Band is based in 
Opelousas, has become one of the most popular folk 
musicians to perform regularly in Canada. Before coming 
to the Festival, Castille will make his annual appearance in 
Quebec. 

A member of the Country Music Hall of Fame, Davis is 
most famous for composing and recording "You Are My 
Sunshine." He is also well known nationally for such 
gospel songs as "Suppertime" and his recent musical 
tribute to his home state, "Louisiana, This One Is For 
You." 





Folk Legends 

One of America's premier folk acts, the 
Carter Family, will perform at this year's festival 



Folk Artist 

Brownie Ford, an accomplished folk 
musician, will appear again at this year's 
Natchitoches Folk Festival. 



Church-Hot 



Stfholic 
■ 

• prilipino lumpias (egg 
dIIs),? 1 noodles), Beef 
eriyff'ed Wontons 

• Sf'cal Society-Cane 
liver] Rice, Gumbo and 
lakes 

• D^ana Jambalaya. 



Festival Dates: 

July 13,14,15 



That's Entertainment! 

Pictured is one of last year's en- 
tertainment groups. For the 1 984 Festival, 
many more acts are scheduled. 




I 



July 10, 1984 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Vol. 73, No.l 



6 



Sports < 



Tracksters place on 
All-Louisiana squad 



Led by first place finishes in 
two relay events, the track and 
field team was well- 
represented on the Louisiana 
Sports Writers Association All- 
Louisiana track and field team 
for 1984. 

The Demons, along with 
having the best times in both 
the 400-meter relay and the 
1 600-meter relay, also placed 
second in two events and third 
in three other events. Only 
two schools, LSU and 
Southwestern had more 
representatives on the squad 
than the Demons. The team 
consists of the top three 
performances in each event. 

Northwestern's 400-meter 
relay team earned the fastest 
time in the state for the year 
by running a 39.71 in winning 
the Rice Meet of Champions. 
That foursome consisted of 
Percy McGlory, Mario 
Johnson, Edgar Washington, 
and Cedric Evans. The 
Demons also placed sixth in 
the nation in the event. 

The 1 600-meter relay team 
of Johnson , Evans, 
Washington, and Donald 
Toussaint ran a 3:08.24 to set 



a school record with the 
fastest time in the state for the 
year. That also came at the 
Rice Meet of Champions and 
earned a third place finish. 

Both Johnson and 
Washington tied for the third 
fastest time in the state in the 
200-meters with times of 
20.98. Johnson was also 
second in the state in the 1 00- 
meters with a 10.31 clocking 
at the Texas Relays. 

Freshman jumper Eric 
Barber ranked in the state in 
both the long and triple jumps. 
Barber, from Natchez, MS, 
ranked second in the triple 
jump with a best effort of 51- 
10Vi for the season, while 
also jumping 24-7 in the long 
jump to tie for the third place 
honors. 

Distance runner Ricky Fuller 
was the other Demon on the 
all-state team as he had the 
third fastest time in the state in 
the 1 0,000-meters with an 
effort of 33:03.16. 

Showing the type of track 
and field talent around the 
state, six state records were 
broken during the spring of 
1984. 




Demons Lasso the Cowboys 

Northwestern defensive players tackle a McNeese runner in last year's 18-13 loss to the 
Cowboys. NSU opens its 1 984 season at McNeese. 

Explode '84 Kicks Off 



Explode '84, Northwestern 
football's season ticket drive 
for the upcoming season, 
kicked off on June 30 when 
10 teams of seven members 
each began their season for 
renewing and increasing 
season ticket holders for 
Demon football games. 

Last week, the teams 
worked towards renewing all 
season tickets from a year ago 



and towards reaching the goal 
of 1 ,000 new season ticket 
holders for Turpin Stadium 
home games. 

The league of ten teams was 
organized by Nan Holmes, 
manager of internal 
operations. Athletic Director 
Tynes Hildebrand is the 



league's commissioner. 

Each team captain was 
allowed to select their team at 
a special draft. Teams had two 
weeks to prepare their game 
plan for the one-week season, 
and each team was given a 
certain number of people to 
contact for ticket renewals. 



Seven Sign for Softball 



Northwestern head softball 
Coach James Smith has 
announced the signing of 
seven players to play softball 
for the Lady Demons in 1 985. 

Those who will attend 
Northwestern in the fall in- 
clude Ginger Craig from 
Converse High School, 
Jeanne DiVittorio from Belaire 
High School in Baton Rouge, 
Tracy Foshee from Riverdale 
Academy in Coushatta, Laurie 
Kimmey from Deer Park High 
in Deer Park, Tex., Maureen 
Kracik from Sacred Heart 
Academy in Springfield, 
Illinois; Missy Landreneau 
from Mamou High, and Donna 
Jo Lafitte of Mansfield, who 
will transfer from Northeast. 

Craig is a pitcher and 
shortstop who led her prep 
team in batting for six years 
during her career. This past 
season she batted .750 as 
Converse posted a 1 9-3 
overall record. 

DiVittorio posted & 4-1 
record while pitching in 1 983 
and played first base fulltime in 
1984. This nast season she 



batted .415 while earning all- 
district and team MVP honors. 
DiVittorio was also an all- 
district basketball selection. 

Foshee enjoyed an out- 
standing career in both soft- 
ball and basketball as a prep. 
Foshee has been a standout in 
summer league softball as 
Riverdale Academy does not 
have softball. She also was an 
all-state basketball player and 
joins prep basketball team- 
mate Monica Lee as a Lady 
Demon recruit. 

Kimmey is a top pitcher in 
the Houston area who was 
named Most Outstanding 
Softball Player at Deer Park 
High in 1983. While pitching 
in the summer program in the 
Houston area Kimmey has 
pitched her squad to several 
invitational tournament 
championships. 

Kracik has caught and 
played both in the infield and 
outfield during her prep career 
in Illinois. Kracik batted .407 



and was also named to the all- 
city basketball team. 

Landreneau earlier signed a 
partial basketball scholarship 
and will compete in both 
sports at Northwestern. 
Landreneau has caught and 
played both shortstop and 
third base during her prep 
career. 

Laffirte attended Mansfield 
High School and originally 
attended Northeast before 
coming to Northwestern. This 
past season with the Lady 
Indians Laffitte started 13 
games, had 13 complete 
games and compiled an 
earned run average of 1.73, 
allowing just 25 earned runs in 
101 innings with 37 walks and 
21 strikeouts. 

Northwestern in 1 985 will 
compete for the conference 
championship in the newly 
formed Gulf Star Conference 
after playing as a Division I 
independent for the past two 
years. 



ARE YOUR 
COLLEGE FINANCES IN 
CRITICAL CONDITION? 

Joining the Army Reserve can 
reduce your college costs. If you qual- 
ify, our Educational Assistance pro- 
gram will pay up to $1,000 a year 
of your tuition for four years. 

If you have taken out a National 
Direct or Guaranteed Student Loan 
since October 1, 1975, our Loan 
Forgiveness program will repay 15% 
of your debt (up to $10,000) or $500, 
whichever is greater, for each year 
you serve. 

If you'd like to find out more 

about how a Reserve enlistment can 

help pay for college, call the number 

below. Or stop by. 

SS Harry Harrell 
U.S. Army Recruiting Station 
119 Royal Street, Natchitoches, LA 
357-8469 

"ASK ABOUT OUR BUDDY PLATOON" 

ARMY RESERVE. 
BE ALL YOU CAN BE 




Vol. 73, No. 3 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Sports 



Seventeen Earn Track Letters 



Track and field Coach Leon 
Johnson has announced a list 
of 1 7 lettermen for the 1 984 
outdoor track and field 
season. That list includes four 
seniors, six juniors, one 

1 * 

* SIGMA KAPPA I 

i * 

"Something * 



* 
* 
* 



Special" 



Be A Part of It! 



* 
* 
* 
* 



sophomore and six freshmen. 

Seniors earning letters 
include distance runner Brian 
Barrios, shot put and discus 
man Jimmy Chilton, sprinter 
Mario Johnson and decathlete 
Rick Schweitzer. This past 
season Johnson earned his 
third All-American honor as the 
Demons placed sixth in the 
nation in the 400-meter relay. 

The junior lettermen include 
sprinter Ray Brown, sprinter 
Percy McGlory, sprinter 
Kenny Mosley, pole vaulter 
Tim Sprowl, distance runner 
Andy Nelson and sprinter 
Edgar Washington. 

Washington earned All- 
American honors for the 




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graduate programs leading to either 
the Master of Science or Doctor of 
Philosophy Degree in the Depart- 
ment of Anatomy, annual stipends 
of $7200.00 with waiver of tuition 
fees are available to qualified 
students. 

For application forms and 
additional information contact Dr. 
John A. Beal, Coordinator of 
Graduate Studies, Department of 
anatomy, Louisiana State University 
School of Medicine. Shreveport, 
Louisiana 71130. 



second time this year while 
McGlory became an All- 
American for the first time in 
his career. Wilson Brown was 
the only sophomore to earn a 
letter in 1984. 

The list of first year athletes 
to letter includes long and 
triple jumper Eric Barber, 
distance runner Russell Duty, 
sprinter Cedric Evans, 
distance man Ricky Fuller, 
hurdler Gerard Henry, sprinter 
Donald Toussaint. Evans was 
the fourth Demon to earn All- 
American honors on the relay 
team. 

Northwestern in placing 
sixth in the NCAA meet in the 
400-meter relay scored seven 
team points, good enough to 
tie for 50th place in the overall 
team standings, the fourth 
straight time the Demons have 
scored points in the national 
meet. 



NEED CASH? Earn $500 plus each school year. 
2-4 (flexible hours per week placing and filling 
posters on campus. Serious workers only; we 
give recommendations. Call now for summer 
and next fall. 1 800-243-6679. 





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Frisbee Disco 

Two students find the field behind Rapides Hall a great 
place to practice a little frisbee. 

Barnes, Carroll 
Win for Rodeo Team 



Sharlon Barnes of Zachary 
and Brian Carroll of Opelousas 
were average winners for NSU 
at the National Intercollegiate 
Rodeo Association's Southern 
Region Finals conducted 
recently in San Antonio. 

Barnes, who finished the 
region's 1 983-84 regular 
season as the fourth-place 
rider, scored 136 points on 
two horses to win the saddle 
bronc riding average. 

Winning the Southern 
Region Finals' steer wrestling 
competition was Carroll, who 
threw down two steers in a 
total of 17.1 seconds. He 
came into the finals as the No. 
6 steer wrestler in the region. 

Also in saddle bronc riding, 
Billy Frey of Eunice scored 
1 34 points for two rides to tie 
for second place. He qualified 
for the June 19-23 College 
National Finals Rodeo in 
Bozeman, Mont., by placing 



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Next To A & A Western 
240 Keyser 352-2935 



second at the end of the 
season. 

NSU time-event specialists 
placed first, second and third 
in steer wrestling. Finishing 
behind Carroll were second- 
place Lynn Hataway of Dry 
Prong, 21.4 and third-place 
John Hoare of East Palatka, 
Fla., 27.2 Hoare has earned 
his first trip to the College 
National Finals Rodeo as the 
region's No. 2 steer wrestler. 

Other students who placed 
in the average at the Southern 
Region Finals were Mike 
Yancey of Lewisville, Tex., 
tying for third in bull riding with 
136 points; Jeb Barney of 
Beckville, Tex., placing 
second in calf roping with 
25.1 seconds; Telena Hines 
of DeRidder, winning fourth in 
barrel racing with 33.72 
seconds, and Lynn Roller of 
Jonesboro, who was paired 
with Cathy Dennison of 
McNeese to claim third place 
in team roping with 28.4 
seconds. 



A Kappa Sigma 

The Most Wanted 
Man In The 
Country 



July 10, 1984 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Vol. 73, No. 3 



8 



Viewpoint 



No Problems At 
Inside View '84 



Session one of Inside View is now history. Nearly 200 
students got their first taste of college life this past weekend, 
and most are excited about returning in the fall. 

Unlike last year's program, this year had very little con- 
troversy. The Insiders made sure the act was funny and in- 
formative, but free from sexual jokes or innuendos. 

The opening act, an airband take-off of the Pepsi commercials 
with Michael Jackson, was well received by both parents and 
students. The Demon mascot was on hand to get the group 
"fired up," and the orientation bingo helped break the ice. 

The Intramural Half-Niter went smoothly, too, and all par- 
ticipants seemed to enjoy themselves. The Rec Complex party 
was cancelled because of severe weather, adding some free 
time to the schedule. 

A technical problem forced the group to revamp the 
Residence Hall Capers. Instead of the planned skit, groups of 
students discussed dorm life - it's advantages and disad- 
vantages. Afterwards, most students felt more comfortable 
about living on campus. 

This year's Insiders worked well together and with their 
groups to try and honestly answer questions about Inside View 
and NSU. Because of this, the 1 984 freshmen class will come 
to Northwestern well prepared for college life. 

The program was also aided by many Northwestern students 
and faculty /staff members. Barbara Gillis and Dan Seymour 
coordinated Inside View with the admissions staff - Mary Ackel, 
Randy Nichols, Randy Pierce, Sherri Waggoner, and Vicki 
Williams. Tootie Cary and staff handled the Intramurals, while 
Mickie Townsend, Camille Hawthorne, and PFM coordinated 
student activities. 

Members of Kappa Alpha and Kappa Sigma fraternities helped 
students move in and out of the dorms, and many students were 
active in Cabaret. Randy Adcock and Jimmy Hartline worked 
with the music, and members of the band gave their time at the 
farewell session. 

This year, Inside View was a University event. It was not just 
ten students and several staff members. It was people from all 
phases of campus life banding together to present Nor- 
thwestern to its future "Demon generation." To everyone 
concerned, good job! 



GARFIELD® by Jim Davis 




Current Quotes 



When (and if) Caldwell Hall is rebuilt, should it be rebuilt like it was or with 
new, modern architecture? 




Monica La Com be 
Sophomore 

"We should get a new 
building - perhaps something 
comparable to the World 
Trade Center." 



Kathy Hubbard 
Senior 

"If they're going to the 



Nelll Cameron 
Professor of English 

"I don't think it should be 



trouble of building a new one, rebuilt at all. We have too 



it should be like it was." 



many buildings." 



Letter: Medievel Club Sought at NSU 



Nor- 
first 



of 



All 



Dear Editor, 

On April 9-14, 
thwestern hosted its 
Renaissance Festival 
Consisting of a number 
diverse events and activities- 
such as art exhibits on 
Shakespeare and on Chivalry 
the movie A Man for 
Seasons, a television tape of 
Becket in the Union, the 
University Players' excellent 
production of Twelfth Night, a 
forum led by visiting scholars 
on Humanism, a concert-the 
Festival culminated with the 
meeting of the South Central 
Renaissance Conference and 
the celebration of the Nor- 
thwestern Medieval-Renaiss- 
ance Fair. 

A number of people 
tending the Fair, however, 
expressed some interest in 
the idea of the Fair and 
forming a Medieval Club 
patterned after such groups in 
The Society for Creative 



at- 



in 



Anachronisms. So, I would like 
to call for a brief, informal 
meeting of such people on 
Thursday, 12 July, at 3:00 
p.m. We will meet at my office, 
31 6-0. of Kyser Hall and then 
seek a more comfortable spot. 

If knighthood appeals to 
you, if you fancy the honors of 
a ladyship, if you get misty- 
eyed thinking of dungeons and 
racks, if sorcery has lost none 
of its magic for you, if you find 
alchemy more interesting than 
chemistry, if jesters still offer 

you the freedom of laughter, if 
your thirst seeks the solace of 
mead or ale, if you identify 
with cony-catchers or bawds, 
if you ever hath dreamed of 
shining armor and beautiful 
maidens, of handsome knights 
and chivalrous conduct, of a 
time and place more lusty and 
adventurous than your own, of 
days past and delights barely 
remembered, then you are 



invited to attend this gathering 
of, if you cannot be there 
personally^. to send your varlet 



or knave with your name. 

Jos. A. Johnson 
Language Arts 



Letter: Varnado Quiet 
Hours Anything But Quiet 



Dear Editor, 

I am a resident of Varnado 
Hall, where the quiet hours are 
supposedly from 8 p.m. until 8 
a.m. What a farce! There are 
certain individuals who believe 
this rule should apply to 
everyone but themselves. 
From the screaming in the 
halls to the singing sessions in 
the showers at 3 a.m., it's 
gotten to the point where the 
other residents are planning to 
move out. Despite the con- 
stant efforts of our R.A.'s, 
house director, and Mickie 
Townsend (Director of 
Housing), the students 



continue their childish 
behavior. 

Numerous attempts to try 
and reason with these certain 
students have been useless. 
They refuse to respect the 
rights of others. They have no 
inkling of common courtesy! 

This is not the point of view 
of one individual, but the 
consensus of a large number 
of dorm residents. Steps are 
being taken to remedy this 
situation. Bravo! Let's hope 
this time it will work! 

Pissed off (and on) 
in Varnado 



Current Sauce 



usps 140-eeo 



Staff 



John Ramsey 
Editor 

Robin J. Gunter 
News Editor 

Darlene Winslow 

Features/ 
Photography 

Franklin I. Presson 
Advisor 

Current Sauce is published 
every other Tuesday during the 
summer session by students of 
Northwestern State University 
of Louisiana. The paper is 
student-run and financed, and 
is not associated with any 
school or department. 

Editorial and business of- 
fices are located at 225A Kyser 
Hall. Office hours are 1-4 p.m. 
weekdays. 

All correspondence should 
be brought by the office or sent 
to Box 5306. NSU. Nat- 
chitoches, LA 71497. 
Deadline for pubication is the 
Thursday preceding Tuesday 
publication. 



jP 



Current Sauce 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 

NATCHITOCHES, LA 



Celebration Of A Century, 
1884-1984 



Vol. 73, No. 4 
Sept. 11, 1984 




THE GULF STAR: 

Exactly what 
schools are in this 
new conference? 
Where are they? 
Details on pages 10 
and 11. 



WORLD WAR III 
BEGINS 

If this headline was 
true, where should 
you go? See page 13. 




GARFIELD RETURNS 
Garfield was such a 
hit during the 
summer that he's 
back for new ad- 
ventures! See page 
19. 



POLITICS 

Tod Klotzbach talks 
about his term as 
SGA president. See 
page 14. 



ZIGGY JOINS THE 
STAFF 

America's unluck- 
>est cartoon character 
Joins the Current 
Sauce. See page 20. 




Kappa Sigma, Phi Mu pledge most 



Rush ends; 1 34 students pledge 



Nine of the 16 Greek 
organizations on campus have 
ended their fall rush, and 1 34 
students have thus far 
pledged a fraternity or 
sorority. 

The remaining seven Greeks 
begin deferred rush this week. 

Three of the four sororities 
pledged a total of 60 women. 
Phi Mu reported the largest 
class, with 24. Sigma Sigma 
Sigma was right behind with 
21 , and Sigma Kappa pledged 



14. Delta Zeta, coming off 
recolonization in the spring, 
gained no pledges. 

Fraternities outpledged 
sororities this year, as the 
male Greeks picked up 74 
men. Kappa Sigma claimed 
the largest pledae class, with 
20. Kappa Alpha and Tau 
Kappa Epsilon were right 
behind with 1 9 each. Sigma 
Tau Gamma added nine men, 
while Theta Chi picked up six. 
Phi Mu pledges are Kristen 



Allred, Shannon Bennett, Mel 
Bice, Jackie Carroll, Angie 
Cross, Val Doiron, Cathy 
Ernst, Angela Griffith, Dena 
Haynes, Lisa Lawson, Doogie 
McNulty, Em Matthews, Dana 
Medlin, Trudi Mills, Susan 
Rea, Sonya Roark, Sally 
Russell, Carole Smith, Stacy 
Thurmon, Susan Trussed, 
Donna Jo Vercher, and Hillory 
Verret. 



Tri-Sigma's 



newest 




Clowning Around 



The Demon mascot amuses the cheerleaders during a recent photo session. Sitting are 
Jimmy Chilton and Melissa Hightower. Standing, from I to r, are Theresa Guillory 
Albertha Jones, Scott Repp, Julie Browder, Mark Colomb, captain Laurie Weaver, Sonya 
Roark, and Stacy Thurmon. 

Student trust fund viewed 



by Gena Williams 

Staff Writer 

"Students will support it, but 
they have got to hear about it 
first," states Sherri Waggoner, 
new coordinator of enrollment 
management. "It" is the new 
plan for a student trust fund at 
Northwestern. 

David Eschenfelder, student 
and creator of this plan, 
wanted something that 
students could benefit from 
and could see visible results. 

Under the plan, each 
student would self-assess an 
additional five dollars in 
anything the student body so 
desired. Also, students will 
vote for a trust council to 
oversee this money. 



For example, the money 
could be used for better 
advertisement for NSU and 
better landscaping and im- 
provements for the campus 
itself, but, only if voted on by 
the student body and the trust 
council. 

Additional scholarships, 
possibly including scholar- 
ships for part-time students, if 
they were willing to assess 
themselves the $5 fee. 

"It's an endowment put 
together for the students by 
the students," stresses 
Eschenfelder. 

Other changes have also 
taken place in Admissions 
over the summer. Three of the 
four admissions counselors 
resigned and Waggoner was 



promoted to her new post. 

For recruiting purposes this 
year, NSU's student recruiting 
group, Student Ambassadors, 
will work with the "threesome" 
of Terry Faust, Director of 
Financial Aid; Randy Nichols, 
Director of Admissions; and 
Waggoner. 

"This is a completely new 
recruiting system for Nor- 
thwestern," said Waggoner. 
"We will begin by focusing and 
recruiting locally, beginning 
with Natchitoches Parish. 
Recent NSU graduates such 
as Joe and Allison Stamey and 
other alumni will be getting 
involved as well by recruiting 
in high schools in the areas 
where they live." 



members are Chrissey Bailey, 
Kim Cooley, Melissa Cox, 
Linda Doll, Jennifer Douglas, 
Lisa Elkins, Tracy Fisher, Pam 
Gardner, Linda Harrison, 
Donna Lewis, Paula Jean Loe, 
Colleen Lynch, Cindy 
McAbee, Kristy Peeples, 
Paula Ray, Lisa Seeger, Patti 
Smiley, Gena Williams, Paula 
Woodall, and Charlotte 
Zumwalt. 

Sigma Kappa pledges are 
Susan Collum, Cindy Foster, 
DeAnne Hargis, Rachel 
Heider, Wanda Huhner, Karen 
Hutchins, June Johnson, Anita 
Loderidge, Karen Nichols, 
Suzette Sand, Nancy Seiple, 
Francine Sibelle, Mikki Stark, 
and Kim Slaton. 

Kappa Sigma's newest 
"Sig Dogs" are Tim Bates, 
Jimmy Chilton, John Cun- 
ningham, Nick Day, Mike 
Gibson, Rick Hammer, Kevin 
Hopkins, Steve Horton, Greg 
Jolley, Tim Keeley, John 
Kingsley, Edd Lee. Lynn 
Lindsey, James Maxey, Dan 
Medlin, Tim Sheffer, Kenneth 
Stephens, Dale Strickland, 
Pat Turner, and John Whiting. 

Kappa Alpha pledges are 
John Bacon, David Bennett, 
Kevin Burley, Rick Briley, 
John Davis, Chris Gray, 
Darrell Hickman, Car.ey 
Honea, Dru Laborde, Joe 
Lusk, Eric Madson, Landon 
Mathis, Sammy McCormic, 
Mark Miles, Bobby Mizell, Dan 
Pickett, Robert Wagley, and 
Bryan Williams. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon pledges 
include Philip Anousakes, 
Eddy Broadway, Richard 
Clary, Steve Hardy, Mike 
Hodgkins, Chuck Hostettler, 
Damon Land, John Lever, 
Kent Mastavich, Jon Maynard, 
Grady Norton, Chris Pearce, 
Harold Rush, Jeff Sandifer, 
Danny Sisson, John Tim- 
berlake, Phil Vaughn, and 
Ward Yates. 

Sigma Tau Gamma 

pledged Jerry Ackerman, 
Eddie Alamilla, Joe Cook, 
Mike Deramee, Benjamin 
Gillis, Paul Jones, Charley 
Moore, Douglas McBride, and 
Scott Sibille. 

Theta Chi pledges are 
Marlin Basco, Jerry Clifton, 
Will James, David Silver, Brian 
Smith, and Sami Wehbe. 



September 11,1 984 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Vol. 73, No. 4 



2 



News 



Williams A warded 
Theatre's Grant 



Vince Williams, a recent 
graduate of Northwestern, has 
been awarded a grant to enroll 
this fall in Florida State 
University's professional actor 
training conservatory at the 
prestigious Asolo State 
Theatre in Sarasota, Fla. 

Williams, who starred this 
summer as the runaway slave 
in Joshua Logan and Bruce 
Pomahac's new musical Huck 
and Jim on the Mississippi, 
graduated in August with the 
bachelor of arts degree in 
speech and theatre. 

At the Asolo State Theatre, 
which celebrated its 25th 
anniversary last year as 
Florida's premier state theatre, 
Williams will be pursuing the 
master of fine arts degree in 
acting through the con- 
servatory's two-year 
professional actor training 
program directed by Dr. Ruby 
Allen. 

As a graduate student, 
Williams will be given the 
opportunity to perform both 
major and minor roles during 
his association with one of the 
few theatres that still alter- 



nates plays in the style of the 
British repertory companies. 

In addition to the main stage 
productions, Williams may 
audition for the theatre's 
company that is the major 
touring group in Florida and 
also for one of three separate 
equity troups that present 
student and adult enrichment 
productions from October 
through April. 

Graduates of the Florida 
State University professional 
actor training program and the 
Asolo State Theatre's own 
students are so well-prepared 
that many find employment in 
network television produc- 
tions, in theatres both on and 
off Broadway, in established 
regional theatres, and as 
teachers of theatrical arts. 

While at Northwestern, 
Williams was considered one 
of the more seasoned 
collegiate stage actors. He 
studied the art of acting and 
performing under the direction 
of stage directors and theatre 
professors Dr. E. Robert Black 
and Ray Schexnider. 



Twelve Selected 
As Entertainers 



Twelve $1,000 scholar- 
ships have been awarded 
each to students who have 
been selected as touring 
members of the NSU En- 
tertainers, a popular top 40 
musical group which is now in 
its eleventh year. 

Leigh Wood Johnson, 
coordinator and musical 
director of the NSU En- 
tertainers, said the final 
selection of the group's in- 
strumentalists, vocalists, and 
sound technician was made 
last weekend at the close of a 
week-long rehearsal camp. 

Scholarship members of the 
NSU Entertainers are Melinda 
Moore, Denny Shoup, Rick 
Pierce, Bill Welch, Lesh 
Brown, Dru Laborde, 
Stephanie Ryals, Chris Gray, 
Susan Arthur, Patricia Frank, 
Lisa Elkins, and Lori Plunkett. 

Highlighting the En- 
tertainers' 1 984 semester 
schedule will be performances 
Sept. 30 at the Red River 
Revel in Shreveport, Oct. 20 
at the Louisiana State Fair in 
i :>:-».' "ikoi'I jMjfift'O: j| 



Shreveport, Oct. 21 at the 
Potlatch Festival in Carthage, 
Tex., Nov. 3 at the Pecan 
Festival in Colfax, and Dec. 1 
at the Natchitoches Christmas 
Festival. Last week the group 
performed at the 1 984 
World's Fair. 

Johnson said the group is 
"especially impressive 
because of the talent, 
professionalism and en- 
thusiam of its members." 

She added, "Northwestern 
is justifiably proud of its 

touring musical ambassordors, 
who continue to provide 
wholesome, quality en- 
tertainment for high school 
assemblies, civic clubs, 
conventions, fairs, pageants, 
and festivals across the 
region." 

Requests for performances 
by the NSU Entertainers have 
continually increased as the 
group's reputation for ex- 
cellent entertainment 
becomes more far-reaching, 
Mrs. Johnson said. 




The Natchitoches Rotary Club recently presented Northwestern State University speech 
and theatre graduate Vince Williams with a $250 scholarship to assist him when he 
enrolls this fall in Florida State University's professional actor training conservatory at 
Asolo State Theatre in Sarasota. At left is Dr. William Hunt, Rotary Club board member 
and chairman of NSU's Department of Theatre and Media Arts, and at right is president Dr. 
Joseph Orze. Williams also has received a grant from FSU to study for two years at 
Florida's premier state theatre. 



'Name the Demon' Underway 



A contest to name the 
Demon mascot is currently 
underway, with the winner of 
the contest to receive a free 
weekend at the State Fair 
Classic in October. The 
contest is being sponsored by 
radio stations KNOC/KDBH 
and the athletic department. 

While the Demon has been 
the Northwestern mascot 
since the early 1900's, the 
mascot has never had a name. 
Anyone may enter the contest 
as often as they wish. 

Entries will be accepted 
until 6:00 p.m. on September 
21 , with the winning entry to 
be announced during pre- 
game activities of the Nor- 
thwestern-Abilene Christian 
football on Saturday, Sep- 
tember 22. A selection 
committee at Northwestern 
will make the final selection for 
the new name. 

Entries may be mailed to 
KNOC Radio, Front St., 
Natchitoches, LA. Entries may 
also be left at the Fieldhouse 
or at any of the four main 
banks in Natchitoches. 

The person who enters the 
winning name will be the guest 
of the athletic department at 
the State Fair activities the 
weekend of October 20 when 
the Demons face arch-rival 
Louisiana Tech. 

The prize will include two 



nights lodging at the 
LeBossier in Bossier City, two 
tickets to a Friday evening all 
you-can-eat buffet, two tickets 
to a Friday night dance, two 
tickets to a Saturday pre-game 



pool party, two tickets to ride 
the NSU busses to the football 
game, and two game tickets to 
the after- the -game dance 
featuring "John Fred and the 
Playboys." 



Sigma Kappa 

SOMETHING SPECIAL 




FALL PLEDGES 


Susan Collum 






Cindy Foster 




DeAnne Hargis 


Rachel Heider 






Wanda Huhner 




Karen Hutchins 


June Johnson 






Anita Loderidge 




Karen Nichols 


Suzette Sand 






Nancy Seiple 




Francine Sibelle 


Mikki Stark 






Kim Slaton 



Vol. 73, No. 4 



CURRENT SAUCE 



September 11, 1984 



News 



3 



'Cuckoo's Nest' Auditions Complete 



Auditions are now complete 
to select a cast of 25 people 
to appear in NSU's 
fall production of One Flew 
Over The Cuckoo's Nest. 

NSU students and in- 
dividuals from the Nat- 
chitoches community were 
auditioned Tuesday and 
Wednesday from 3 p.m. to 5 
p.m. and from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. 
in the Fine Arts Auditorium of 
the A.A. Fredericks Creative 
and Performing Arts Center. 

Ray Schexnider, associate 
professor of theatre who is the 



state director for the award- 
winning production, said 
special auditions were also 

"We were really 
interested in adults who 
are a few years older 
than college students." 
-Ray Schexnider 

arranged for individuals from 
the Natchitoches community 
and NSU students interested 
in trying out for a role in the 
play. 



ich 
he 

at 
)er 
Dr. 

at 



i ride 
Dtball 
its to 
ance 
i the 



rgis 



hins 



hols 



>e//e 




Special auditions with 
Schexnider may be scheduled 
by calling the Department of 
Theatre and Media Arts at 
357-6196. 

"From the community and 
the Natchitoches area in 
general," said Schexnider, 
"we were really interested in 
adults who are a few years 
older than college students." 

A box office success as a 
Broadway play and also as a 
movie, One Flew Over The 
Cuckoo's Nest was written by 
Dale Wasserman. The play 



Help bring the world together, 
one friendship at a time. 

There can be no greater challenge...no 
greater satisfaction. That's why thousands 
of young Americans like you are traveling to 
other countries as part of a Presidential 
Initiative for peace—International Youth 
Exchange. IF you're one of them, youll live 
abroad with your new host family Go to new 
schools. Make new friends. They, in turn, 
will learn about America from the best of all 
sources. An American. 

In short, youll be helping to bring our 
world together, one friendship at a time. 

Teenagers between 15 and 19 repre- 
senting all segments of American society are 
being selected. If you'd like to be one of 
them, write for more information on pro- 
grams, costs and financial aid. 

Write: YOUTH EXCHANGE, Pueblo, Colorado 81009 



A message from The Presidents Council for International Youth Exchange, The Consortium for 
IntematJorublCntaen -GKehange. «nd The Adv e r tis ing Council-. - - 



was adapted from the novel by 
Ken Kesey. 

One Flew Over The 
Cuckoo's Nest will be 
presented at NSU on Oct. 25, 
26 and 27 at 7:30 p.m. in the 
Fine Arts Auditorium. 

This is the second time that 
Schexnider has directed One 
Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest 
at NSU. His other stage 
credits at Northwestern in- 
clude Who's Afraid of Virginia 
Woolf], I'm Getting My Act 
Together and Taking In One 
The Road, and Children of a 
Lesser God. 



GRADUATE STUDY 



IN CELL BIOLOGY, 
NEUROSCIENCE, 

DEVELOPMENT BIOLOGY, 
AND IMMUNOLOGY 




Louisiana State University Medical 
Center in Shreveport offers 
graduate programs leading to either 
the Master of Science or Doctor of 
Philosophy Degree in the Depart- 
ment of Anatomy, annual stipends 
of $7200.00 with waiver of tuition 
fees are available to qualified 
students. 

For application forms and 
additional information contact Dr. 
John A. Beal, Coordinator of 
Graduate Studies, Department of 
anatomy, Louisiana State University 
School of Medicine. Shreveport, 
Louisiana 71130. 



II 



8 



NEWS 
BRIEFS 



SMITH TO 
DIRECT 
TESTING CENTER 

Susan B. Smith of Ruston 
has been appointed staff 
counselor and director of 
the Testing Center. 

President Orze an- 
nounced the appointment 
this week, following its 
approval by the State Board 
of Trustees. 

Smith succeeds Oscar 
Billingsley, who retired this 
summer after serving the 
past 20 years as a member 
of the University's coun- 
seling and testing staff. 

Before moving to Nor- 
thwestern, Mrs. Smith had 
supervisor of 
the Counseling 
Louisiana Tech 
since July of 



been the 
testing for 
Center at 
University 
1979. 



CARR APPOINTED 
AS DEPARTMENT 
CHAIRMAN 

Dr. Dan B. Carr, 
nationally-known authority 
in the fields of educational 
research and curriculum 
development and a faculty 
member at NSU since 
1972, has been appointed 
chairman of the Department 
of Education. 

President Dr. Joseph J. 
Orze announced the ap- 
pointment, which became 
effective last month 
following approval by the 
State Board of Trustees. 

Carr succeeds Dr. 
Mildred Bailey, who was 
named this summer as dean 
of the College of Graduate 
Studies and Research at 
NSU. 



GYMNASTICS 
CLASSES 
OFFERED 

Gymnastics classes for 
youth in all grades are being 
offered this fall through the 
Division of Continuing 
Education and Community 
Services. 

Beginning, intermediate 
and advanced levels of 
instruction on all Olympic 
events for boys and girls 
are included in the program, 
which began Sept. 5 and 
continues through Dec. 5. 



September 11, 1984 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Vol. 73, No. 4 



4 



News 



Continuing Education Off ers Various Programs 



A wide range of non-credit 
adult leisure-time, youth, 
travel and Elderhostel ac- 
tivities have been programmed 
for the 1984 fall community 
service program offered by 
the NSU's Division of Con- 
tinuing Education and 
Community Services. 

"After 1 00 years of serving 
the community and the area," 
said Peter Banta, division 
director, "we are welcoming 
people aboard toward Nor- 
thwestern's next 100 years. 
We are letting people know 
that our community service 
programs are geared toward 
them and that our fall com- 
munity service program is 
loaded with more offerings 
than we have ever had." 

The theme of the fall 
community service program is 
"Welcome Aboard, We're 
Packed and Ready for You." 

He added, "We are excited 
about this type of program- 
ming and anticipate a great 
response from the community 
and the area. This is our 
largest effort ever in leisure- 
time activities, and we have a 
great variety of interest areas, 
something for everyone in the 
family." 

The division's adult leisure- 
time program includes over 40 
enrichment courses in 
business, finance and 
professional development, 



crafts and hobbies, family and 
personal development, the 
arts, home improvement and 
physical fitness. 

Also offered in the adult 
leisure-time program are 
public service and certification 
activities dealing with notary 
publics, weapons 
familiarization and self 
protection for women, first aid 
and cardiopulmonary 
resuscitation. 

More than 25 enrichment 
courses covering such areas 
as hobbies, the arts, skills 
building and health, physical 
education and safety are 
planned for the youth 
program. 

Just for youth are activities 
like bicycle safety and 
registration, tennis, gym- 
nastics, karate, basic rescue 
and water safety for swim- 
mers, aerobics, beginning 
computer instruction, self 
hypnosis, drawing, arts and 
crafts, oil and watercolor 
painting, creative writing, 
creative movement, beginning 
jazz and break dancing, clog 
dancing, basic photography 
and smocking. 

The travel program the 
division has developed in- 
cludes one-day, weekend and 
week-long trips. 

There will be excursions this 
fall to the World's Fair in New 
Orleans, a fall pilgrimage to 



Natchez, Miss., a day of 
racing at Louisiana Downs, an 
antique tour of Central 
Louisiana and a trip to Mexico. 

The adult leisure-time 
program has been greatly 
expanded, according to 
Banta. 

Special courses in the 
business, finance and 
professional development 
area will be offered for people 
interested in successful 
leadership, microcomputer 
workshop for novices, per- 
sonal financial planning, estate 
planning, word processing 
using the microcomputer and 
securities, taxes and in- 
vestments. 

Crafts and hobbies courses 
to be taught include advanced 
cake decorating, bonsai 
cultivation, candy making, 
basic sewing, beginning 
smocking, antiques, smocking 
Christmas ornaments and 
cross-stitch embroidery. 

In the area of family and 
personal development, there 
will be courses on systematic 
training for effective parenting, 
coping with loss, death and 
dying, and self hypnosis for 
personal effectiveness. 

Arts classes will cover such 
subjects as oil painting, 
painting with watercolors, 
creative writing, calligraphy 
and creative photography. 



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Positions Open: 

1 Rep-At-Large 
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Public Relations & Advertising Chairperson 
Cinema Focus Chairperson 



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APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE IN SU RM. 214 



For home owners and 
renters, there will be home 
improvement courses on 
winterizing house plants, fall 
gardening, wallcovering and 
painting. 

Health and physical fitness 
classes in the adult leisure- 
time program include 
swimming for older adults, 
karate, ballet, jazz dancing, 
ballroom-disco-country west- 
ern dancing, modern dance, 
aerobics and clog dancing. 



Northwestern is one of only 
two universities in Louisiana 
offering Elderhostel, an in- 
ternational program tha ! 
provides special low-cost, 
short-term residentia 
academic programs for older 
adults. 



RESEARCH PAPERS 



14,789 to choose from — all subjects! 
Rush $2 for the current 306-page cata- 
log. Custom research & thesis assis- 
tance also available. 
Research, 11 322 Idaho Ave.. #206 JC, 
Los Angeles, CA 90025 (2 1 3} 477-8226. 



Famous last words 
from friends to friends. 

"Are you OK to drive?" 
"What's a few beers?" 

"Did you have too much to drink?" 
"I'm perfectly fine" 

"Are you in any sfiape to drive?" 
"I've never felt better:" 

"I think you've had a few too many? 
"You kiddin, I can drive 
with my eyes closed" 

"You've had too much to drink, 

let nuz drive? 
"Nobody drives my car but me." 

"Are you OK to drive?" 

few beers?" 




DRINKING AND DRIVING 
CAN KILL A FRIENDSHIP 



U. S. Department of Transportation ftvl 

Coma 



o.4 



Vol. 73, No. 4 



CURRENT SAUCE 



September 11,1 984 



News 



5 



is 

f only 
isiana 
n in- 
thai 
-cost, 
mtial 
oldei 




Hauser Selected for 
Semester in Canada 



President Dr. Joseph J. Orze (left) presents one of the "Celebration of a Century" 
posters to senior industrial arts education major Duane Hauser, who will give it to the 
University of Alberta in Canada when he enrolls there this month as an exchange student 
from NSU. At right is Dr. Edward Graham, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 
Hauser is the first NSU student to be selected to participate in the International Student 
Exchange Program. 



Senior industrial arts 
education major Duane 
Hauser, has been accepted as 
NSU's first participant in the 
International Student Ex- 
change Program. 

Hauser is enrolling this week 
at the University of Alberta in 
Edmonton, Alberta, where he 
will be registered as an ex- 
change student from NSU for 
the fall semester. 

Northwestern is one of 
about 150 institutions in 25 
countries currently par- 
ticipating in the International 
Student Exchange Program. 
Foreign students have been 
enrolling at Northwestern on 
an exchange basis since 
1 978, but this is the first time 
that an NSU student has been 
selected to study at an in- 
stitution in another country. 

"I am really looking forward 
to studying for three months in 



Canada," said Hauser. "I have 
always believed that it would 
be good for me as a future 
teacher to broaden my 
educational background. The 
cultural knowledge I gain will 
give me a better un- 
derstanding - of a culture 
existing outside the United 
States." 

Dr. Edward Graham, dean of 
the College of Arts and 
Sciences, said three students 
from other countries have 
studied at NSU as exchange 
students since Northwestern 
became affiliated with the 
international program six years 
ago. 

"The program is becoming 
more popular every year," 
said Graham. "The program 
gives students a chance to 
learn about a foreign country 
while making progress toward 
a degree." 



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Vol. 73, No. 4 



CURRENT SAUCE 



September 11,1 984 



News 



7 




Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts began 
class in its new building last week. The old Natchitoches 
High can accomodate 750 students. 



Kappa Sigma 

A Tough Act to Follow! 




Announcing our 1984 Fall Pledge Class... 



Tim Bates 
Jimmy Chilton 
John Cunningham 
Nick Day 
Mike Gibson 
Rick Hammer 
Kevin Hopkins 
Steve Horton 
Greg Joiley 
Tim Keeley 



John Kingsley 
Edd Lee 
Lynn Lindsey 
James Maxey 
Dan Medlin 
Tim Sheffer 
Kenneth Stephens 
Dale Strickland 
Pat Turner 
John Whiting 



THANKS K.A. FOR THE KEG! 



Metal Works On Display 



"Works in Woven Metal," a 
graduate thesis exhibition by 
Audrey Grigg Hammill of 
Alexandria, will be on display 
through Sept. 21, in the 
Orville J. Hanchey Gallery of 
A.A. Fredericks Creative and 
Performing Arts Center. 

A reception honoring Mrs. 
Hammill, who currently is 
curator of exhibitions and 
collections at the Alexandria 
Museum Visual Art Center, is 
scheduled for Sunday, Sept. 
9, from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. in the 
gallery. 

She completed the 
requirements for the Master of 
Arts degree in art at Nor- 
thwestern in August. Her 
major professor at NSU was 



Dr. Mary Carolyn Roberts, a 
professor who specializes in 
weaving. 

The 16 works in Mrs. 
HammiH's exhibition at Nor- 
thwestern formed the basis for 
the artist's graduate thesis, 
entitled "An Exploration in the 
Rigidity of Metals in Woven 
Forms." 

Her thesis is an investigation 
into the use of metals in 
weaving, an art she was in- 
troduced to while studying at 
the Penland School of Crafts 



in North Carolina. 

Mrs. Hammill has been 
interested in weaving for some 
10 years, especially after 
seeing it done by master 
craftsmen at Williamsburg, Va. 

The artist, who purchased 
her first loom in New Orleans, 
also has studied weaving at 
the Arrowmont School of Arts 
and Crafts in Gatlinburg, 
Tenn., where she learned 
tapestry weaving and cloth 
dying. 



Bailey Promoted As 
New Graduate Dean 



WANTED: 

Student Editor for 
Argus. Pays $500 per 
semester. Prefer 
English major or minor 
but will consider 
person who reads and 
writes. Contact: 
Neill Cameron 
Languages Dept. 
Office 316-0. 



Dr. Orze recently an- 
nounced the promotion of Dr. 
Mildred Bailey from chairman 
of the Department of 
Education to dean of the 
College of Graduate Studies 
and Research. 

Orze said the promotion, 
which was approved recently 
by the Board of Trustees, will 
become effective on Aug. 1. 
She succeeds Dr. Donald M. 
Rawson, who is retiring this 
summer after 24 years at 
NSU, including the last four 



years as Graduate School 
Dean. 

A faculty member at Nor- 
thwestern since 1963, Bailey 
has served the past year as 
professor and head of the 
Department of Education for 
seven years. 

It was under Bailey's 
direction that Northwestern's 
graduate program in reading 
was initiated in 1 966. The first 
master's degree in reading in 
Louisiana "was awarded by 
NSU in 1967. 



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Vol. 73, No. 4 



CURRENT SAUCE 



September 11, 1984 



News 



9 




TKE Recognized 
As 'Most Improved' 



Gettln' It Together 

Members ol the 1985 Potpourri yearbook staff watch a video concerning computerized 
yearbooks. Potpourri will be laid out on computer this year. 

Many Displeased with Potpourri 



by Lisa Williams 

Managing Editor 

The 1984 Potpourri made 
its belated debut this summer 
and received mixed reviews, 
most of which were not 
favorable. 

In prior years, Potpourris 
were available for students to 
pick up during the last two or 
three weeks of the spring 
semester. Because of delays 
in getting shipments to the 
publisher, the yearbooks were 
not available for students to 
Pick up until the first week of 
June. 

According to Carla Erickson, 
editor of the 1 985 Potpourri 
and former Classes and 
Events Editor of the 1984 
yearbook, a "failure of staff 
members to meet deadlines" 
was cited as the reason for the 
yearbooks' delay. "Getting 
Pictures was our biggest 
Problem," she said, adding 
that "the staff photographer 
n ad not been very depen- 
dable." 

Poor photo quality and a 
9eneral lack of photos 
seemed to be the biggest 
complaint from Northwestern 
students. 

One student who wished to 
remain anonymous remarked, 
They gave color pages to 
scenes in the Natchitoches 
ar ea, but the Northwestern 
activity pages were definitely 
lacking." 

'The ohoto outlines were 
n °t well thought-out, kind of 
juvenile," commented John 
Hamsey, editor of the Current 
aauce. 



Most of the pictures were 
either grainy and dark or too 
light," said another student." 
Many had no focal point. In 
general, I was very 
dissatisfied." 

Some students commented 
that many of the photographs 
were from years ago. There's 
even a picture of my old car in 
front of Louisiana Dorm." 

While many students had 
negative remarks about the 
1984 Potpourri, there were 
also some positive comments. 
Many were pleased with the 
Classes Section and the 
cover. 



Zona Police thought the 
Potpourri was "really good- 
better than my highschool 
yearbook." 

Referring to the 1984 
staff's lack of photography 
manpower, Erickson said that 
the staff has "two 
photographers for sure, 
maybe three." 

Erickson felt the staff 
needed more organization and 
"we're having meetings every 
other week. Everybody 
already knows what is ex- 
pected of him. We also have 
more apprentices than last 
year." 



by John Ramsey 

Editor 

Northwestern's chapter of 
Tau Kappa Epsilon (TKE) 
recently was recognized as 
TKE's most improved chapter 
in the nation. 

The award was announced 
by T.J. Schmidt, the frater- 
nity's executive vice- 
president. Schmidt, who also 
actually chose the winning 
chapters, will present the 
actual award to the chapter at 
homecoming. 

Factors in the decision were 
overall size improvement, 
chapter scholarship, a 
scrapbook of projects and 
activities, money donated to 
St. Jude's (TKE's national 
philanthropy), intramurals, and 
leadership roles in campus 
organizations. 

"We've really improved as a 
chapter over the past few 
years," said Jon Robbins, TKE 
member and IFC president. 
"In 1981, we had 8 actives. 



Now we're up to 19 actives 
and 1 9 pledges." 

"In fact, it's in 1981 that 
most of today's leaders were 
pledged," he continued. 
"Since then, we've won the 
(intramural) trophy, become 
involved in campus politics, 
and we now have a much 
better image." 

Epsilon Upsilon, NSU's 
chapter, was tied with Penn 
State University for the top 
"most improved" position until 
the scrapbook was judged. It 
was this book that made 
Schmidt decide on Nor- 
thwestern. 

In addition to receiving the 
actual award, Epsilon Upsilon 
will be honored in The Teke, 
Tau Kappa Epsilon's national 
magazine. 

In addition to NSU, eight 
other Louisiana schools have 
TKE chapters. There are also 
colonies at McNeese and 
Southeastern. 



Kratz Selected as 
ROTC Commander 



Danny Kratz, sophomore 
economics major, has been 
selected as the commander of 
the corps of cadets for NSU's 
Reserve Officers Training 
Corps. 




Back to School 



Tw ° Louisiana School students pose with the new sign in front of the College Avenue 
building. The school recently opened its doors with 400 gifted and talented high school 
students. 



The appointment of the new 
cadet corps commander for 
the 1984-85 academic year 
was announced this week by 
Lt. Col. William Fisher, 
professor of military science 
and director of the ROTC 
program at Northwestern. 

"As the cadet corps 
commander," said Kratz, "I 
hope to enhance the ROTC 
image not only on campus but 
also throughout the area 
through campus activities and 
high scholastic of our ad- 
vanced-course cadets." 

Kratz, who is a cadet 
colonel in the Northwestern 
Senior Army ROTC, received 
the coveted RECONDO 
Badge this summer while 
attending the ROTC Advanced 
Summer Camp at Ft. Riley, 
Kan. He received the honor 
for demonstrating superior 
skills in water and mountain 
training exercises and for 
achievements on the Army's 
physical readines test. 

In addition to the ROTC, 
Kratz' other activities include 
serving as vice-president of 
Theta Chi Fraternity and as a 
senator-at-large in the Student 
Government Association. 



September 11, 1984 



C 



The Gulf Star Conferences Academid/ 








Stephen F. Austin 



HOME OF THE LUMBERJACKS 



Natchitoches' sister city 
in Texas, Nacogdoches, is 
the site of one of Nor- 
thwestern's biggest rivals, 
Stephen F. Austin State 
University. 

SFA is located on a 
beautiful 1 ,000 acre tract 
of land. The campus is 
enhanced by the presence 
of a historic Spanish fort. 

Purple and white are the 
school colors, and the 
mascot is the Lumberjack. 

Each year, the winner of 
the NSU-SFA football game 
receives Chief Caddo, a 
nine-foot wooden Indian. 
NSU won the Chief for 
seven straight years before 
last year's 27-25 
homecoming loss to the 
'Jacks. 




The modern Steen Library on the campus of Stephen F. 
Austin State University is an example of the school's up-to- 
date facilities. 

SFA is located in Natchitoches' twin city, Nacogdoches, 
Texas. 



In this, Northwestiar of s 
Louisianans, Demon will be< 
era - that of competiftformec 
Conference. 

For several yearsjn a ps 
Trans America Athle (TAA 
conference did not (us, the 
competed as a f%ende 
Demons could notg l-AA 
although they have flip 20 tv 
1980. 

Five universities j<rn in tf 
Texas entries are State, £ 
Texas State, and SU State. 
State and Southeast schoc 
out the Gulf Star. Stin, Nic 
SLU are regulars on ie. 

Not only will the coootball 
(TAAC did not have^n, eith 
will aid all sports in tools are 
than several hours drom on( 
In the TAAC, schooled fror 
Georgia to west Texa 

Coaches, studenW comrr 
generally excited abfar Con 
And why not? Thlwill br 
money, television ©r rival 
increased fan supportime in 
Demon teams will hferenc 
pionship, with the purning 
NCAA playoffs - andial title. 



Southeastern 



HOME OF THE LIONS 

Southeastern Louisiana 
University was founded in 
1 925 as a junior college for 
students in Tangipahoa 
Parish. The school has 
since grown to its present 
day enrollment of almost 
8,000 students. 

The university is located 
in Hammond, a small 
college town 40 miles east 
of Baton Rouge and 60 
miles north of New Orleans. 

Green and gold are SLU's 
colors, and the Lion is the 
mascot. For several years, 
SLU has been an NCAA 
Division IAA independent. 

NSU and Southeastern 
have met on the gridiron 45 
times, with the Demons 
holding a slim 23-22 ad- 
vantage. Last season, SLU 
was nationally ranked until a 
23-7 upset at the hands of 
Northwestern. 



University Center is the newest addition to the SLU campus in Hammond. 




Southwest 



HOME OF THE BOBCATS 



The heart of Texas - 
that's right where 
Southwest Texas State 
University is located. 

Located in San Marcos, a 
small city between Austin 
and San Antonio, STSU 
currently enrolls over 
17,000 students. 

The school mascot is the 
Bobcat, and colors are 
maroon and gold. Prior to 



their 
Star, the 
part of 
Conference^ 
years. 

Southwes 5 
played only 
The Demd 
heartbreak* ' 
last year 
touted Bob' 
the NCAA $ 
in 1982. 

] 



1 

Un 
wh 

F 

Un 



4 




id Athletic Excellence 



lwestiar of service to 
3monwill begin a new 
npetittformed Gulf Star 

/earsjn a part of the 
Athl© (TAAC). The 
not |us, the Demons 

a Impendent. The 
not i l-AA playoffs, 

ave fiip 20 twice since 

:ies j<rn in the GSC. 
are State, Southwest 
id St« State. Nicholls 
heasl schools, round 
ar. £tin, Nicholls and 
s on Me. 

he coootball and track 
naveDn, either), but it 
s in fools are no more 
jrs dram one another, 
ichoqed from eastern 
Texa 

denti community are 
!d abar Conference. 

Th will bring more 
on er rivalries, and 
jpportime in years, -all 
will nference cham- 
the pming berths to 
and al title. 



Nicholls State 




HOME OF THE COLONELS 



Nicholls State University 
was founded in 1948 as 
Francis T. Nicholls Junior 
College, and was a part of 
the LSU system. 

Nicholls gained its "in- 
dependence" from LSU 
several years later, and like 
Northwestern, was granted 
university status in 1 970. 
Nicholls' small campus is 
along Bayou Lafourche, 
and some 6,000 students 
attend class at the bayou 
country's own NSU. 

School colors at Nicholls 



State are red and gray, and 
the Colonel is the mascot. 
Along with Northwestern, 
the Colonels have been a 
member of the TAAC in all 
sports except football and 
track. 

Northwestern leads the 
overall series between the 
two schools, 6-5. 
Southeastern is the 
Colonels' big rival, and the 
two play each other each 
year in the Riverbed 
Classic, south Louisiana's 
answer to the State Fair 
Classic. 



An aerial view of the campus of Nicholls State University In 

Thlbodaux. 



Sam Houston 




HOME OF THE BEARKATS 

Sam Houston State 
University is located in 
Huntsville, a small city of 
central Texas. Over 
12,000 students attend 
Sam Houston. 

Like Southwest Texas 
and Stephen F. Austin, the 
school had been a part of 
the Lone Star Conference 
since 1931. When the 
three withdrew to join the 
GSC, only five teams were 
left in the LSC. 

Sam Houston's colors are 



orange and white, and 
athletic teams are known as 
the Bearkats. 

While the 'Kats are not 
known for their strength in 
football, Sam Houston 
annually dominates the 
region in golf and other 
spring sports. On the grid, 
the Demons and Bearkats 
have met six times, with 
each side winning three. 
The 1 984 contest in Turpin 
Stadium will be the first 
meeting of the two teams 
since 1 958. 



iwes* 
only: 
em<r 
eake* 

Boi£ 
AA ? 

> 



TOP: The J.C. Kellam Library at Southwest Texaa State 
v ® rs 'ty Is situated on the banks of the San Marcos River, 
wnich cuts through the campus. 

RIGHT: The Criminal Justice Center at Sam Houston State 
university in Huntsville, Texas. 




■ea 



WHAT EVERY STUDENT 
SHOULD KNOW ABOUT THE DIFFERENCES 
BETWEEN LEASING A TELEPHONE AND 

LEASING A CHICKEN. 




Yes, there are differences. 
And we think you should 
know what they are. Ask 
yourself these questions. 

WHEN YOU LEASE A 

CHICKEN, DO YOU 

GET THREE MONTHS 
FREE DURING 
THE SUMMER? 
Probably not. But when 
you lease your telephone 
from AT&T this fall, you 
won't pay any lease charges 
next summer. You can use 
your phone at home, and bring 
it back to school in the fall. 

DO LEASED CHICKENS COME IN A 
SELECTION OF COLORS AND STYLES? 

No. Chickens don't come in many colors 
But the AT&T telephone you lease this 
fall comes in a variety of colors and 
three popular styles. 

ARE LEASED CHICKENS 
REPAIRED FREE? 

Don't kid yourself. Repairing a 
chicken is a delicate process that requires the work 
of expensive professionals. However, in the off chance your 



telephone will be shipped 
directly to you after one 
call to 1-800-555-8111, 
or you can pick up your 
phone at any of our AT&T 
Phone Centers. 



ONE FINAL QUESTION: 
DOES IT COST THE SAME 
TO LEASE A CHICKEN AS 
TO LEASE A TELEPHONE 

THIS FALL? 
Hardly. While we have no 
hard data on the exact cost of 
leasing a chicken, we can tell you 
with some certainty that the cost 
of leasing a telephone this fall is 
far less than you might think. 
The decision to lease a chicken 
or a telephone, of course, rests with 
you. But should you opt for the tele- 
phone, remember: you get three months 
free next summer, and you can take the 
phone home with you. There's a choice of 
colors and styles, free repair, and we'll 
ship you the phone 
or you can pick 





AT&T leased telephone needs repairs, we'll fix it absolutely 
free when you visit any of our AT&T Phone Centers. 
ARE LEASED CHICKENS SHIPPED DIRECTLY TO YOU? 

Ship a chicken? Don't be silly. However, your AT&T leased 

Call The Toll Free Number Listed Above 



it up at any 
of our AT&T Phone Centers. 

It doesn't cost much either. And 
that's something to crow about. 

AT&T Consumer Sales and 
Service. To order your telephone, 
call 1-800-555-8111 for delivery 
right to your door or for information 
concerning AT&T Phone Center 
locations. 



AT&T 



Valid Willi the looming restrictions: I . You must bo registered lor 1:! accredited hours for the IfW fall term. .'. Valid only to students billed by AT&T Consumer Sales and Service. !i Delinquent accounts are void from oner. 4. Limit two telephones per account. 5. Offer expires 
72 months from lease initiation date, 6. This offer is not valid for permanent year-round resident students. 7. The three free months will not begin until you have paid for the first nine months of your lease. 8. All telephones are FCC registered. We provide repair service for all 
telephones sold at AT&T Phone Centers Onlv telephones equipped with Touchtone dialing can access certain longdistance ser\ ices and networks Copvnght. AT&T Consumer Sales and Service \9M 



September 11, 1984 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Vol. 73, No. 4 



Features 



13 



What if we were attacked? 



'Red Dawn 9 Over Chaplin's Lake 



by Scott Cox 

Staff Writer 

University Police cars slowly 
creep up and down Sibley 
Drive and Caspari Street 
sounding the ominous war- 
nings. Local TV and radio 
stations blast messages for 
people to proceed to the 
nearest crisis relocation 
center. A nuclear attack has 
been launched against the 
United States and time is of 
the essence. 

The conditions described 
above, not unlike scenes 
depicted in the movies "The 
Day After" and more recently 
"Red Dawn," seem to be a 
remote possibility to most 
NSU students. However, the 
threat of a nuclear attack on 
this country is a reality. Will 
NSU students and faculty 
know where to go and what to 
exDect in such a disaster? 

"In the event that a nuclear 
attack is launched, persons on 
the Northwestern campus 
won't have far to go once they 
have been warned," said 
Leigh Perkins, director of the 
Natchitoches Parish Civil 
Defense Agency. "Almost all 
of the buildings on campus are 
designated shelter areas 
because of their brick and 
concrete structure." 

The command to relocate to 
shelter areas would be 



initiated by the governor of 
each state at the request of 
the President of the United 
States. Locally, all activities 
would be coordinated from the 
Emergency Operation Center 
located in the basement floor 
of the Natchitoches Parish 
Courthouse. 

Once in the shelters, 
Perkins estimates that people 
will have to stay inside for a 
minium of 10 to 14 days 
depending on weather 
conditions and the amount of 
radioactive fallout. However, 
the most critical period 
concerning shelter is the first 
24 hours after the explosion. 

Since the U.S. federal 
government has not stock- 
piled food in the last few 
years, the local civil defence 
agency plans to contact all of 
the grocery stores in the city 
and have pre-designated 
persons pick up the food 
supplies and deliver them to 
the shelters. The only Civil 
Defense stockpiles of any kind 
are under the bleachers at 
Prather Coliseum, which is to 
be used as an emergency 
hospital in case of disaster. 

In addition to some Nat- 
chitoches city residents in the 
Student Union, Sabine Hall, 
and other such designated 
shelter areas on the campus, 
residents from other cities 



would flee to Natchitoches. 
People from a high risk area 
such as Shreveport would 
come to Natchitoches 
because the city, including the 
NSU campus, is considered 
by the Louisiana Department 
of Public Safety (LDPS) to be 
a "host area." 

There is room for ap- 
proximately 42,000 evacuees 
in the city alone, according to 
Perkins. 

In addition to Shreveport, 
the LDPS currently considers 
seven other La. cities and the 
surrounding suburbs as risk 
areas. These are Monroe, 
Leesville, Alexandria, Lake 
Charles, Baton Rouge, 
Lafayette, and New Orleans. 

But Perkins believes that 
Natchitoches would receive 
most of its radioactive fallout 
from the Houston area. 
"Studies have shown that 
most of the fallout in this area 
would most likely drift east- 
ward or north eastward," he 
said. 

NSU students and faculty 
are advised to know which 
buildings on campus are 
shelter areas. Many of these 
buildings are marked by the 
universally known civil 
defense signs and the words 
"fallout shelter." 



DON'T RUSH, 
"HURRY" 

SAB'S 2nd Annual 
"HURRY PARTY" 
Student Union Lobby 
Thursday, Sept. 13, 1984 

Stop By And See If 
SAB Is For You 



If one is unable to reach 
some kind of shelter or 
structure, the U.S. Office of 
Civil Defense recommends 
that one cover himself with the 



most dense material possible. 

"Hopefully a nuclear attack 
will never happen," Perkins 
added, "but it is always good 
to be prepared." 



Noteworthy 



KNIGHTS INFO 
MEETING 
SCHEDULED 

Plans are finalized to form 
a Knights of Clumbus 
Council at Holy Cross 
Church for men of that 
parish and students and 
staff of Northwestern. For 
this purpose, an in- 
formational meeting will be 
held in the lounge area of 
Holy Cross at 7:00 p.m. on 
Tuesday, Sept. 11. All 
interested Catholic men are 
invited to come and hear 
what the Knights are all 
about. Membership is open 
to any practicing Catholic at 
least 18 years of age. 



A.S.A. TO MEET 
THURSDAY 

The Association of 
Student Artists will hold 
their first meeting this 
Thursday at 8 p.m. in the 
A. A. Fredericks Center. 

All interested persons are 
invited. 



FIVE RAD. TECH. 
GRADS CERTIFIED 

Five recent graduates of 
the clinical radiologic 
technology program have 
passed the national cer- 
tification examination 
adminsitered by the 
American Registry of 
Radiologic Technologists. 

The average score of the 
NSU graduates was 86, 
higher than the national 
norm and well above the 
passing grade of 75. 

The students were 
awarded the bachelor of 
science degree in 
radiologic technology in 
May and were administered 
the examination in July. 

Northwestern graduates 
who passed the July 
national certification 
examintion were Ali 
Kamyab, Dyan Grappe, 
Susan Fenton, Bonita 
Barrois and Terri Coates. 

Kamyab, Grappe and 



Fenton completed their 
junior and senior years at 
NSU's clinical affiliate at 
Schumpert Medical Center 
in Shreveport. Barrois and 
Coates completed their 
clinical training at St. 
Francis Cabrini Hospital in 
Alexandria. 

SCHUMPERT OFFERING 
SCHOLARSHIPS 

Schumpert Medical 
Center in Shreveport has 
established scholarships 
valued at $1 ,500 over four 
years for NSU students 
majoring in radiologic 
technology. 

J. Fred Price, assistant 
professor, said the 
scholarships will be made 
available to students 
beginning this fall. 

Radiologic technology 
students awarded the 
scholarships will receive 
$200 for their freshman 
year, $300 for their 
sophomore year and $500 
for each of their junior and 
senior years in the 
program. 

COVINGTON WINS 
$1000 SCHOLARSHIP 

Judith Covington, a 
senior mathematics 
education major, has been 
awarded the $1 ,000 Leroy 
S. Miller Scholarship. 

The award, which is 
presented annually to an 
outstanding student 
majoring in mathematics or 
mathematics education, 
was established in 1 980 
with a $10,000 con- 
tribution from the late 
mathematics and physics 
professor who served for 
30 years on the NSU 
faculty. 

Covington, who has 
maintained a 3.74 
academic average, is at- 
tending Northwestern on a 
full academic scholarship. 
She is a member of Phi Mu, 
Purple Jackets, Student 
Ambassadors and Alpha 
Lambda Delta. 



September 11, 1984 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Vol. 73, No. 4 



14 



Features 



Klotzback Discusses Views, Ambitions 



by John Ramsey 

Editor 

In April, the students of 
Northwestern elected Tod 
Klotzbach as SGA President, 
the highest student position at 
NSU. Klotzbach's election 
came in one of the most 
controversial campaigns in 
Northwestern history. 

Several months after the 
election, Klotzbach was in- 
terviewed by Current Sauce. 
In the discussion he recalled 
SGA's past problems and his 
plans for the future. 
Looking back on your 
controversial election as 
president, what changes will 
be made in the election 
code? 

I plan to tighten the loopholes 
in the code. SGA will also 
have an Internal Affairs 
committee composed of five 
senators. The committee will 
deal with problems concerning 
the constitution, election 
code, etc. 

Coming into the fall 
semester, what do you see 
as SGA's strengths and 
weaknesses? 

Well, our strength is the fact 
that everyone sees a need for 
change in the SGA. The 
election proved that. On the 
weak end, we have a lack of 
communication among SGA 
members. 

What is your biggest con- 
cern about this upcoming 
school year? 

There are two things that 
really bother me - apathy and 
the budget. I really think 
everyone will work this year, 
but you always worry. And 
the budget is not really en- 
couraging, but we're at- 



tempting to get financial help 
from local businesses and 
industry. 

Concerning your opponents 
in the election, Scott Repp 
and Greg Shoalmire. Do you 
plan to appoint them to any 
SGA position? 

I haven't talked to Scott since 
the election, but Greg and I 
have spoken several times. I 
think Greg is planning to run 
for office, but if he doesn't or if 
he loses, I will appoint him to 
an office. 

Do you plan to implement 
any new programs in the 
fall? 

Definitely. I'm planning to 
expand the legal services 
program, and I'd like to 
provide some kind of income 
tax service for students. That 
way, people would be 
available to answer questions 
about whether or not students 
are supposed to count federal 
aid and scholarships as 
taxable income, for example. 
Also, I'm planning on greatly 
increasing SGA's involvement 
in campus entertainment. We 
don't want to take away from 
SAB; just be there to help 
them. 

You mentioned a low 
budget. Will any programs 
or services be cut? 

Yes. I'm trying to generally 
cut back on expenses. In the 
past, cabinet members made 
$5 a month. Now, they'll 
make $50. It'll save money, 
plus get people who don't just 
do the job for the paycheck. I 
also did away with Spirit 
Chairman. It wasn't a paid 
position, but sometimes 
required money. We will keep 
public relations, legal ser- 



if. S. Department of Transportation 




DRINKING AND DRIVING 
CAN KILL A FRIENDSHIP 



vices, student life, and 
Shreveport relations, though. 
Some students have com- 
mented that you've ap- 
pointed your political friends 
to vacant positions. Any 
comments? 

I have appointed students 
who've helped me out, but it's 
no different from any previous 
administration. Anyway, I've 



also offered positions to 
students involved in "rival" 
organizations. 

Where will Tod Klotzbach be 
ten years from now? 

Hopefully, I'll be involved in 
the national political scene - 
maybe with the Republican 
Party. I love politics. For most 
it's a job; for me, it's a hobby. 
In general, what should 



students expect from SGA 
this year? 

They'll get a new SGA, from 
reorganization to new faces. 
We have new committees, 
such as Student Life, to which 
any student can belong. 
Hopefully, SGA will work for 
the students this year, Instead 
of being just another group on 
campus. 




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Vol. 73, No. 4 



CURRENT SAUCE 



September 11, 1984 



Sports 



15 



After two years at Many 



Former Lady Demon Takes Over As Coach 



Linda Jones, a former Lady 
Demon standout in both 
basketball and softball, has 
been named as the Lady 
Demon softball and volleyball 
coach. Jones, a native of Ft. 
Walton Beach, FL, received 
her bachelor's degree in 
Health and Physical Education 
from Northwestern in 1981 
and a year later received her 
master's degree, also in health 
and physical education. 

For the past two years 
Jones has served as the head 
softball and women's 
basketball coach at Many High 
School. Jones led the 
basketball squad to two 
straight winning seasons, 



compiling a two-year mark of 
32-17. The Many softball 
team won back-to-back 
district titles and won the 
regional championship in 
1983, compiling a two-year 
record of 29-15. 

Prior to taking the position at 
Many, Jones served for one 
season as a graduate 
assistant at NSU, working with 
both the basketball and 
softball teams. 

As a member of the Lady 
Demon basketball team Jones 
earned four varsity letters 
while leading the team in 
assists for the final three years 
of her career. Jones also won 
the team Academic Award 



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both as a junior and as a 
senior. 

Along with leading the team 
in assists for three straight 
seasons, Jones currently 
holds Lady Demon records for 
assists in a game, season and 
career. Jones led the team in 
free throw percentage in 
1980-81, ranks sixth on the 
career list for free throw 
percentage, 1 1 th on the all- 



time scoring list and 5th on the 
list for career field goal per- 
centage. 

"We feel Linda will be a 
great asset to our staff," noted 
Pat Pierson, coordinator of 
women's athletics. "She 
knows our program and the 
way it operates. Her coaching 
records since her graduation 
from Northwestern are im- 
pressive and we know she will 



Dynamite! 

Nan Holmes, manager of internal operations for NSU 
athletics, displays some of the "TNT" and "Demon 
Dynamite" paraphenalia. "TNT" stands for "Tailgatin' in 
Turpin." 



Demon Profiles 



a new weekly 
feature 

JOHN STEPHENS 

John Stephens, a 
freshmen running back, 
played prep football at 
Springhill High School. 
Stephens was one of the 
top Demons signed by 
Northwestern this spring 
and has proven his worth 
already. In the NSU- 
McNeese game Stephens 
carried the ball 5 times for 
26 yards. This young 
freshmen is a Demon to 
watch in the upcoming 
games. 



RODNEY FULTON 

Rodney Fulton, a junior 
from DeRidder, handles the 
deep snaps for the 
Demons. Coach Goodwin 
said in an interview this 
week that Fulton is a great 
snapper and the coaches, 
along with punter Mike 
Crow, really appreciate his 
efforts. Fulton has been 
with the Demons for two 
years and has never had a 
problem with bad snaps. 
Goodwin also said that 
Fulton does not receive a 
lot of publicity, although he 
plays a key role for the 
Demons. 



do an outstanding job with 
both the volleyball and softball 
programs." 

Jones will take over a 
volleyball program that was re- 
instated just a year ago and 
replaces vetern James Smith 
as the softball coach. Smith 
will remain on the staff, serving 
his original duties as Lady 
Demon assistant basketball 
coach. 




Crittenden 
Earns GSC 
Top Honors 



Earnest Crittenden, Nor- 
thwestern's sophomore inside 
linebacker, was been named 
the first ever Gulf Star Con- 
ference Defensive Player of 
the Week for his performance 
in the 17-14 opening games 
loss at McNeese. 

Crittenden, a 6-0, 196- 
pounder from Haynesville, 
totaled 20 tackles in the 
contest as the Demons held 
McNeese to just 233 yards in 
total offense. Crittenden also 
had four tackles behind the 
line of scrimmage, including a 
1 2-yard quarterback sack and 
he returned a pass in- 
terception five yards. 

Crittenden saw plenty of 
action for the Demons a year 
ago and started the final two 
games of the season because 
of ■ injuries to others. Crit- 
tenden was redshirted in his 
first season at Northwestern. 

"Because of the departure 
of Gary Reasons (three time 
All-American) there has been 
alot of pressure put on Ear- 
nest and Freddy Smith," said 
John Thompson, defensive 
coordinator and linebacker 
coach. "But Earnie has never 
been a question mark for us." 

The Offensive Player of the 
Week in the first week of 
action for the season is 
running back Eric Cobble of 
Southwest Texas State. 
Cobble led the pre-season 
favorites to a 38-31 win at 
Wichita State by rushing 1 7 
times for 117 yards and one 
score, that coming on a 12- 
yard run. 



September 11,1 984 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Vol. 73, No. 4 



16 



Sports 



Demons Hit The 
Tube This Fall 



Gulf Star Conference 
President William B. Johnson 
recently announced the 
contract with the College 
Sports Network, which will 
televise three Demon football 
games this fall. The October 
13th game against Nicholls 
State has been changed to 
October 1 1th at 7:00 p.m. in 
Turpin Stadium. The October 
27th game against Sam 
Houston will be on October 
25th at 7:00 p.m., also at 
Turpin Stadium. Along with 
these two games will be the 
game between NSU and 
Stephen F. Austin on 
November 1 7th in 
Nacogdoches, Texas. In order 
for these two home games to 
be televised live^ they had to 
be moved to Thursday nights. 
Otherwise, they would have 
been aired tape-delayed. 

The College Sports Network 
is an all-sports cable network 
which services 35 states and 
approximately 6 million 



homes. CSN will be seen in 
Monroe, Baton Rouge, New 
Orleans, and Lafayette. 

There will be a three man 
team announcing the game. 
Jerry Stovall, former head 
coach at LSU, will be the color 
man. Tim Brando, formerly 
with USA Network, will be 
calling the play-by-play. Jordy 
Hultberg, a former LSU 
basketball player, will be the 
color analyst on the field. 

According to Tynes 
Hildebrand, athletic director, 
there will be big-money ad- 
vertisers featured during the 
games. He also stated that 
NSU will not pay for this 
publicity, but will bring in an 
estimated $25,000 from the 
Gulf Star Conference. 

Although this will be quite a 
switch for Northwestern 
students, the department 
hopes it will constitute a 
bigger turnout for the 
Demons. 




Dallas", Showtime, or the Demons? 



Roundballers add assistant coach 



Melvin Russell, a highly 
successful prep basketball 
coach at Woodlawn High 
School in Shreveport over the 
past seven years, has been 
named as an assistant 
basketball coach at Nor- 
thwestern. 

The announcement was 
made by Coach Wayne Yates 
following recent approval by 
the State Board of Trustees 
for Colleges and Universities. 
Yates also announced that 
assistant Coach Wayne 
Waggoner has assumed the 
duties of handkling the golf 
program. 

Russell has been the head 
coach at Woodlawn for the 
past seven years after serving 
as an assistant at the same 
school for 1 8 months. At 
Woodlawn Russell coached 
his team to a second place 
finish in the district once and 
four times the Knights won the 
district title. 

In 1 979 the Knights placed 
second in the state and the 
following year Woodlawn 
claimed the Louisiana Quad-A 
state championship. Russell 
was named as District Coach 
of the Year four times, was 
named as state Quad-A Coach 
of the Year in 1979 and in 
1980 was named by the 
Louisiana Association of 



Basketball Coaches (LABC) as 
the Coach of the Year. 

A native of Shreveport, 
Russell graduated from 
Woodlawn High in 1969 
before attending Centenary 
College. As a prep Russell 
was named all-city, all-district 
all-state, all-South and All- 
America. 

At Centenary College 
Russell was a three-year 
starter at point guard and he 
holds the Centenary record 
for assists in a game (17) and 
assists in a season (184). 
Russell is third on the Cen- 



tenary list for career assists 
with 387. 

Russell served as a Gent co- 
captain during his final two 
seasons and was named to 
the All-Louisiana team 
following his senior season. 
Russell was drafted by Utah of 
the ABA in the 1 0th round of 
the 1 973 draft. 

"We think Melvin will be an 
outstanding addition to our 
staff," said Yates of the ap- 
pointment. "He will work in all 
phases of our program, in- 
cluding on the floor coaching 
and recruiting. Through his 
experience he has proven to 
be an excellent coach." 



Student Ambassadors 

Thursday, 3:00 p.m. 
Student Union 321 

All interested 
students invited 



Regional and local reps wanted to distribute posters on college 
campuses. Part-time work or more. Requires no sales. Commission 
plus piece work. Average earnings $6.00 per hour. Contact: American 
Passage, 500 Third Ave. West, Seattle, Wa. 98119 1-800-426-2836, 
NETWORK 



FALL 
PLEDGE 
CLASS 



Phi Mu 




The "All Time High" 
Continues... 



Kristen Alfred 
Shannon Bennett 
Mel Bice 
Jackie Carroll 
Angie Cross 
Shahn Dempsey 
Val Doiron 
Cathy Ernst 
Angela Griffith 
Dena Haynes 
Lisa Lawson 
Doogie McNulty 
Em Matthews 
Dana Medlin 
Trudi Mills 
Joelle Odom 
Susan Rea 
Sonya Roark 
Sally Russell 
Carole Smith 
Stacy Thurmon 
Susan Trussell 
Donna Jo Vercher 
Hillory Verret 



Vol. 73, No. 4 



CURRENT SAUCE 



September 11, 1984 



Sports 



17 



Sigs, La. Ladies dominate tug-o-war 



The 1 984 Intramural season 
officially got underway last 
week with two events - tug-o- 
war and biking. 

In tug-o-war, all five of the 
mens teams and three of the 
four womens teams were 
Greek organizations. The 
competition was again held at 
Greek Hill. 



In the mens' division, Kappa 
Sigma successfully defended 
its tug-o-war title by pulling 
past Sig Tau, Kappa Alpha, 
and TKE. The Sigs finished 
the day unbeaten. 

In the womens' division, 
independent group Louisiana 
Ladies remained undefeated 
to win the title. The Ladies 



downed Sigma Kappa in the 
final. 

KA and TKE were matched 
up in two hard fought con- 
tests, with each team winning 
once. The Tekes managed to 
win the second meeting, 
however, to earn the right to 
face Kappa Sig in the finals. 
TKE and KA took second and 




third place, respectively. 

The matchup of Sigma Tau 
Gamma and Theta Chi was 
one of the day's most evenly 
matched contests. Nearly a 
minute went by before the Sig 
Tau's finally pulled their op- 
ponents into the trench. 

Sigma Kappa swept through 
the both Phi Mu and Sigma 
Sigma Sigma, but met its 
match with Louisiana Ladies. 
Phi Mu finished in third place, 
thanks to a forfeit by UnKappa 
Fifth. 

Louisiana Ladies won by 
pulling past Phi Mu once and 
Sigma Kappa twice. 

In the IM mens' biking 



competition, Bobby Thomp- 
son of Budmen finished with a 
time of 11:31, just one tick of 
the clock ahead of the 1 1 :32 
mark of Kappa Sigma's Dennis 
McClung. Tommy Settle, also 
of Kappa Sigma, finished third 
in the seventeen-participant 
field. 

Francis Hanks of Sigma 
Kappa won the womens' 
division with a time of 15:18. 
Theresa Manry of Louisiana 
Ladies was second at 1 7:41 , 
and Mary Bane, representing 
Odyssey, was third with 
19:19. There were four 
participants. 

The course was a five-mile 
loop around the campus. 





Demons Lasso a Cowboy 

Demon linebacker Larry Robinson stops a McNeese runner cold in Northwestern 's 
opening day 17-14 loss to the Cowboys. Helping out is Earnest Crittenden (53), Gulf Star 
Defensive Player of the Week. 



As 

Sugar & Spice 
and Everything Nice 

Featuring 12 Flavors 

Of Popcorn 
Chocolate Candies 
And 
Jelly Bellys! 



457 Jefferson Em W. Knipmeyer 

Natchitoches, LA 71457 Owner 
In the Historic District (31 8)357-81 1 



The Demon 
Playground 

INTRAMURAL STANDINGS 
(as of September 1 0) 



MEN: 

Kappa Sigma 500 pts 

TKE 400 pts 

Kappa Alpha 300 pts 

Sigma Tau Gamma 300 pts 

Budmen 175 pts 

Theta Chi .150 pts 

WOMEN: 

Louisiana Ladies 500 pts 

Sigma Kappa 475 pts 

Phi Mu 250 pts 

Odyssey 175 pts 

Tri-Sigma 150 pts 



McNeese thumps NSU 



Northwestern continued to 
run the ball well, picking up 
where it left off last year, 
despite dropping a 17-14 
decision to McNeese State in 
Lake Charles two weeks ago. 

Playing on a rain-soaked 
field, Demon ball carriers 
chewed up 163 yards in 45 
carries. When added to the 
total from last years' final three 
games, all of which were 
victories, the number of yards 
piled up comes to a hefty 698, 
a per game average of 1 74.5 
yards. 

Last year's leading rusher, 
sophomore tailback Elliott 
. Dawson t . . Jed _ _ nine . . Demon 
rushers with 46 yards on 1*2 



carries. Chris Chenier, seeing 
his first action from the Demon 
backfield, tallied 39 yards on 
just seven attempts. Two 
other players making their 
debut, freshman fullback John 
Stephens and sophomore 
receiver Odessa Turner, 
hopefully gave a preview of 
things to come as they both 
scored a touchdown and 
gained 26 yards rushing 
apiece. Turner, after sitting 
our last season, scored on a 
six-yard run the first time he 
touched the ball as a college 
player. 

It was the defense, 
however., that -kept the 
Demons in "trie game. Pre- 



season All-American Michael 
"Red" Richardson totaled nine 
tackles from his safety 
position and recovered the 
fumble that led to the first 
Demon touchdown of the 
season. 

But it was the performance 
of linebacker Earnest Crit- 
tenden that opened the eyes 
of the 18,500 fans who 
packed Cowboy Stadium, the 
Demon sophomore par- 
ticipated in 20 tackles, in- 
cluding three behind the line of 
the scrimmage for losses 
totaling 16 yards. Fellow 
sophomore James Hall an- 
see "McNeese" 
page 1 8 



— 7^ 

Vo 

September 11, 1984 CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73, No. 4 — 



18 



Sports 




ASU scores in final minute 



Look Out! 

LeRoy Ellis scampers past Angelo State linemen in last 
year's 30-22 Demon win in Turpin Stadium. The Rams 
turned the tables on NSU on Saturday with a last-minute 10-7 
upset. 

Scoreboard 



Saturday night's football 
scores from around Louisiana 
and the Gulf Star Conference 
are: 

McNeese 28, SLU 7: 

McNeese improved to 2-0, 
while Southeastern is now 0- 

2. 



NLU 49, C. Florida 21: 

Northeast is now 2-0, 
Central Florida is 1 . 



SFA43, Prairie View 14 

Stephen F. Austin is 2-0, 
while PVU is 0-1. 

Southwest Texas 28, Texas 
A&IO 

Southwest is 2-0 - on the 
year, while A&l lost its season 
opener. 

USL17,Tech16 

Southwestern and Louisiana 
Tech are both 1-1 on the 
season. 

Boston 16, Grambling 9 

Boston University raised its 
record to 2-0, while Grambling 



slipped to 0-2. 



LSU 21, Florida 21 

LSU is now 0-0-1 , 
Gators are 0-1-1. 



while the 



Georgia 26, USM 19 

Future NSU opponent USM 
is 0-1 , while Georgia is 1 -0. 



Angelo Rams Demons, 10-7 



Losses by seven points or 
less were the Demon 
trademark last season, and 
this year's edition of NSU 
football seems to be taking 
over where last year left off. 

Angelo State kicked a field 
goal with just 33 seconds left 
to lift the Rams to a 1 0-7 win 
over the Demons Saturday 
night in San Angelo, Texas. 

Northwestern fell to 0-2 with 
its second three-point loss. 
Two weeks ago, McNeese 
thumped the Demons, 1 7-1 4. 

After a scoreless first half, 
quarterback Wayne Van's 
one-yard dive into the end 
zone put Northwestern on top, 
6-0. Benny Brouillette kicked 
the PAT with nine minutes left 
in the quarter. 

Angelo responded with an 
82 yard drive that culminated 
with a 1 2-yard touchdown 
pass. Paul Drain added the 
extra point to even the score. 

The Demons threw five 
interceptions in the ballgame, 
four of which came in the 
fourth quarter. After the 
Rams' touchdown, Angelo 
never seriously threatened 
until the closing minutes of the 
game. 

With two minutes left to 
play, Rob Fabrizio, subbing for 
an injured Van, began the 
Demons' last try for the end 
zone. Three plays later, the 
Demons had a second-and- 
seven at the Ram 20. 

Then it happened. 

Angelo's Glenn Saterfield 
picked off a Fabrizio pass, 
returning it 58 yards. Instead 
of NSU threatening, Angelo 
began to look to the end zone 
and the winning score. 

Two plays later, with third- 
and-goal from the NSU 5, 
Drain booted the 20-yard field 
goal to give Angelo State its 
winning margin. 



Offensively, the Demons 
gained 245 yards to the 
Rams' 208. Angelo was 
penalized for 77 yards, with 
only 1 9 yards for the Demons. 

The difference was five 



Northwestern turnovers, with 
just one for the home team. 



NSU 
ASU 













7 
10 



McNeese 



continued from 
page 1 7 

chored the defensive line from 
his end position and recored 
1 1 tackles before leaving late 
in the game with a hamstring 
injury. 

With his two extra points on 
Saturday, placekicker Benny 
Brouillette extended his 
consecutive streak to nine, 
including seven in a row from 
1 983. Punter Mike Crow, who 
tied a school standard last 



year for most punts in a 
season, got off to a good start 
in an attempt to break that 
mark with 10 boots against 
McNeese. 

Last year the sophomore 
punter left-footed 65 punts to 
tie him with 1 93 punter Randy 
Walker. Crow's effort against 
McNeese tied him with Leo 
Clement (1982) for second 
place in the Northwestern 
State record book for most 
punts in a single game. 



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BICYCLE CENTER! 




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134 Hwy.1 South 
9:00-5:30 Monday-Friday 
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Vol. 73, No. 4 



CURRENT SAUCE 



September 11,1 984 



Opinion 



19 



Current Quotes 



Is Geraldine Ferraro qualified to be Vice-President of the United States? 



Susan Trussell 
Freshman 
Equine Science 
Shreveport 

"Yes. She has the 
necessary political ex- 
perience. It doesn't matter, 
though. Mondale isn't 
qualified." 



Shawn Wyble 
Junior 

Agri-Business 
Opelousas 

"No. I really don't know that 
much about her, though. 
She's not publicizing her 
qualifications very well." 



Jim Martin 
Senior 

Physical Education 
Natchitoches 

"Yes. She's a strong lady 
who'll stand her ground. 
She's always poised, but I'm 
still not going to vote for her." 



Melissa McClintock 
Junior 

Early Childhood Education 
Converse 

"No. She doesn't know how 
to address the public, and 
women should not hold the 
office of President." 



Rhonda Henderson 
Sophomore 

Business Administration 
Zwolle 

"Yes. She's got needed 
experience in Congress. 
She's more qualified than 
Mondale is." 



SAB Participation Encouraged 



Dear NSU: 

Welcome Back! Even though the semester's 
just beginning, SAB is busy working for NSU 
students. We are happy to say our first activity 
of the Fall semester, the Howdy Dance, was a 
success. Thanks, to everyone who helped 
make it happen. 

As president of the Student Activities Board, 
I'd like to take this opportunity to invite each of 
you to become an active member of SAB. The 
difference between an upbeat, vibrant campus 



suggestions, Any idea you might have of new 
ways SAB can entertain the students of 
Northwestern is welcome. Put that thought 
down on a slip of paper and drop it by the 
Student Union Office. 

If the hustle and bustle of Rush was too much 
for you, SAB has the cure. Thursday, SAB will 
have its second Annual Hurry Party from 1 1 
a.m. to 2 p.m. in the lobby of the Student 
Union. Hurry Party is an unabashed attempt to 



" Nothing and no one changes overnight. If 
it's change we want, we must be willing to 
work for it." 



and a dull, boring one is you. Your involvement, 
be it as a committee member or just attending 
campus activities makes a difference. Without 
you, our fellow students, there would be no 
Activities Board. The key word in our 
organizaiton is "student." 

If for some reason you hadn't noticed, the 
SAB/lntramural Calendar is quite full this 
semester. A lot of time was spent this summer 
planning activities we hope you'll enjoy. But 
there's still work to be done. SAB needs your 



recruit you into the Activities Board fold. 
Sometimes, it's hard to take the first step to 
involvement, SAB is making it easy by bringing 
the party to you. Stop by, check us out and see 
if Student Activities if for YOU. 

For those unsatisfied with campus life, I'd 
like for you to keep one thing in mind: Nothing 
and no one changes overnight. If it's change 
we want, we must be willing to work for it. 

Stephanie R. Samuels 
President, SAB 



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Professor Writes of Possible Medieval Club 

^V9 <»<*4*^2> <S*+WKJ> «4NHh9 «-*«*VJ> <l*++J» < 



«^*V9 e«#**fc9 

WELCOME | 
BACK ? 
iNSU STUDENTS! 



All NSU 

Imprinted 
Tee Shirts 

Are 25% Off!! 

Sept. 11 -14!! J 



Dear Editor: 

I am writing the SAUCE as a means of 
reaching individual students about the possible 
formation of a Medieval Club at NSU. 

Last Spring, Northwestern held a Medieval- 
Renaissance Festival, a week of varied ac- 
tivities that culminated in a Fair. And this was a 
student event, one that depended upon 
students and their willingness to get involved 
and to make it a success. There were knights, 
ladies, players, troubadors, fools, vendors, 
clerics, witches, even a Lord of Misrule. There 
were games, contests, duels, foods, drinks, 
dances, even a bestowing of knighthoods and 
ladyships. Another such festival is being 
discussed for this Spring; but this one may be 
even more dependent on student interest than 
the first. 

Fairs such as ours are growing in popularity 
across the country. The largest and most 
famous in this area is the one in Texas; but 
there are other highly successful ones in 
California, in Connecticut, in Minnesota, in 
Oregon, in Alabama, and on one of the soap 
operas. Thus far, though, an entire festival held 



in a university by its students seems unique to 
Northwestern. 

This Medieval Club would be patterned after 
those associated with the Society for Creative 
Anachronisms and membership is open to 
anyone who is interested. 

So, if you dream of knights and ladies, of 
castles and dungeons, of troubadors and 
jesters, of potions and swords, of knaves and 

"...if you dream of knights and ladies, of 
castles and dungeons, ...you are invited to 
join the fun." 



wenches, of days more adventurous and nights 
more romantic than those of the dreary modern 
routine, you are invited to join the fun. Call me 
on weekday mornings at 357-6608/357- 
6272; or come by my office, 31 6-Q Kyser. 

Sincerely, 
Jos. A. Johnson 
Language Arts 



September 11, 1984 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Vol. 73, No. 4 



20 

Registration Is 
Always Interesting 

This week's new vocabulary word from the Demon 
Dictionary: 

Regeisetra tion • a four letter word that strikes 
fear in the hearts of both grad students and 
freshmen alike. 

Actually, registration at Northwestern has always 
been considered somewhat easy, especially when 
compared to the tales of eight-hour waits in line and 
booked classes from LSU and other state schools. 
Myths of an easy registration were shattered two 
weeks ago, however. 

Thanks to NSU's new computer system, there was 
no pre-registration in the spring. Last fall, I was the 
envy of my friends at LSU. I spent just thirty minutes 
at registration. This year, well, that figured grew to 
over three hours. 

The line entering the Coliseum was something. If 
we could just get the people in that line to a Demon 
basketball ga*me, we'd double attendance. No 
kidding. 

Once inside the arena, I attempted pulling class 
cards. I started 0-for-3. After rearranging my 
schedule twice, I finally ended up with all but one 
card - Speech. Naturally, a large mob was in line for a 
single Speech 101 section. 

It seems everyone wanted the same teacher at 
9:30 TT that I did. 

Fighting for that card was like battling housewives 
at dollar day at Wal Mart. Tough. I finally got the 
25th, and last, class card. The big athlete behind me 
wasn't too happy when he heard "Sorry - the young 
man in front of you just got the last card." 

With that statement, I quickly made my exit. 

Entering the concourse, I was glad my financial aid 
was all messed up. More long lines. 

As usual, not one or two, but three people have to 
check your packet, fee assessment, etc. I wonder if 
that third person has actually ever found a mistake? 

Next, I get a list of directions to a fraternity party. 
Thanks. I just happen to be rush chairman of that 
fraternity's biggest rival. Finally, I got to the table 
where Roy Hall gets me for $450. Of course, my 
checkbook was in my car - parked by the Field 
House. 

Next year, NSU promises easier, computerized 
registration. Too bad. There's something about 
mass confusion that the soul thrives on. If so, then in 
late August, NSU is the place for you. 
by John Ramsey 

Editor 




...for the 
Current Sauce 
Staff! 



Meetings uch TT, 1:00 
22SA Kyser 
357-5456 



Viewpoint / 




So Much Potential. 



Take Pride in NSU 



Most editorials are about 
subjects that upset or concern 
the individual who is writing it, 
but I would like to write one 
about something I am proud of 
Northwestern State 
University. 

This campus is 100 years 
old and still going strong. Our 
Education department is still 
the best in the state and now 
we have excellent Nursing, 
Music, and Business 
programs - 1 could go on. 

Some of the buildings are 
old, but not run down. Those 
beautiful buildings show the 
culture, pride, and quality of 
Northwestern 's history. The 
interiors of some to our finest 
buildings are newly remodeled 
so that we are not behind the 
times - the A. A. Fredericks 
Center is a perfect example. 

Our campus is one of 
Louisiana's largest, but it is not 
completely cemented. You 
can walk anywhere and there 
will be trees, grass, flowers, 
and many of God's creations 
to behold. 

The student population is 
perfect for getting to know 
people; each freshman class 
brings new faces and new 
friends. By all means, NSU 
students are the friendliest. 

We seem to feel that 
Natchitoches and Nor- 
thwestern do not have enough 
activities to keep students 
involved, but there are over 
90 organizations on campus, 



from special interest to un- 
charted to governmental and 
greeks, that have activities 
that all students can par- 
ticipate in. Some events 
planned by the SGA and SAB 
are organized with us in mind, 
and each person who does 
not attend is not taking ad- 
vantage of what Northwestern 
has to offer. The more 
people, the more activities. 
Each organization can use 
someone who is willing to put 
forth the time and effort. We 
can make Northwestern a 
great place to have fun. 

There is so much potential at 
Northwestern. Each 
curriculum, club, building, 
idea, and person can grow and 
change to become better and 
better. This is the perfect 
example to show how much 
potential we do have. 
Everybody is looking for new 
and better ways to do things; 
everyone is ready and eager 
to listen to your ideas with an 
open mind and help make 
them work. 

One-hundred years have 
gone by, as have many 
students who've attended this 
university. I know, however, 
that I am proud to say I'm a 
Demon from Northwestern 
State University in Nat- 
chitoches. 



by Robin Gunter 



News Editor 



Current 
Sauce 
Staff 

USPS 140-660 



John Ramsey 
Editor 

Lisa Williams 
Managing Editor 

Stacy Scroggins 
Business Manager 

Lucy LeBlanc 
Darlene Winslow 
Advertising 

Kim Nolde 
Sports Editor 

Robin J. Gunter 
News Editor 

Bubba Soileau 
Entertainment 

Scott Cox 
Judy Paschall 
Gena Williams 

News Staff 

Russel Bienvenu 
Circulation Manager 

Kevin Hopkins 
Don Pearce 
Darlene Winslow 

Shawn Wyble 
Photographers 

Peter Minder 
Adviser 

Current Sauce is 
published weekly by 
students of Northwestern 
State University of 
Louisiana. It is student- 
run and financed, and is 
not associated with any of 
the University's colleges 
or departments. Staff 
members are selected by 
the Editor, with the ap- 
proval of the Student 
Media Board. 

Editorial and business 
offices are located at 
225A Kyser Hall. Office 
hours are 1-4 p.m. 
Tuesday through Friday. 
The telephone number is 
(318) 357-5456. 

All correspondence 
should be brought by the 
office or mailed to Box 
5306, NSU, Natchitoches, 
LA 71497. Deadline for 
both advertising and copy 
is 1 p.m. on the Thursday 
preceding Tuesday 
publication. 



Current Sauce 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 

NATCHITOCHES, LA 



Celebration Of A Century, 
1884-1984 



Vol. 73, No. 5 
Sept. 1 8, 1 984 



NSU EXPLODES THIS 
WEEKEND 

N o r t h w e s t e r n ' s 
TNT program kicks 
off Friday with many 
scheduled events. 
See page 5 for more 
on this special 
promotion. 



DEMON PROFILES 

This week, find out 
a little more about 
Demons Mike Crow 
and Roy Fontenot. 



BRIEFLY... 

DPMA, Wesley, and 
SGA information is 
spotlighted in News 
Briefs on page 3. 




ZIGGY 

America's favorite 
returns on page 8. 



MAY THE BEST TEAM 
WIN 

Demon coach Sam 
Goodwin feels 
exactly the opposite - 
the best team lost at 
San Angelo. See 
Page 6. 



REROOFING 

Editor John 
Ramsey gives some 
thoughts into this 
not-so-nice mess. 
See page 8. 

SPOTLIGHT 

p or most NSU 
students, intramurals 
a/e just fun activities. 
p or Tootie Cary, they 
ar e a way of life. See 
Page 7. 



Various Events Set For Family Day 



Family Day, one of the 
favorite traditions at Nor- 
thwestern, is scheduled for 
this Saturday. 

The activities begin at 1 
p.m. with open house in all 
dormitories, fraternity and 
sorority houses, the Field 
House, Recreation Complex, 
and Turpin Stadium's 
Pressbox and VIP areas. 

The NSU Entertainers will 
provide a concert in the 
parking lot of the' Coliseum at 
2 p.m. Family members are 
urged to attend. 

At 3 p.m., parents and 
guests will attend a reception 
in the Union Ballroom. Dinner 
in either Iberville Dining Hall or 
the Union Junction cafeteria 
will follow at 4 p.m. 



The highlight of the day 
comes at 7 p.m., when the 
Demons tackle rival Abilene 
Christian in Turpin Stadium. 

Visitors' passes to the gam© 
will be distributed at the 3 p.m. 
reception in the Union 
only. These passes will 
enable visitors to sit on the 
student side, general ad- 
mission seats, or in section B 
of the reserved side. 

The athletic department 



promotion "TNT" - "Tailgate 
'N Turpin"- kicks off this 
weekend, and live en- 
tertainment will be going in the 
Coliseum parking lot all af- 
ternoon. At 11 a.m., the 
Intramural Blast begins on the 
football practice field by the 
stadium. The Blast will feature 
many types of intramural 
competition. 

And as the TNT acronym 
implies, there will be tailgating 



parties in the Coliseum parking 
lot all afternoon. 

"The Family Day program 
gives parents and family 
members of our students an 
opportunity to visit the 
students' university home," 
said President Orze in last 
week's letter to parents. "And 
it also allows us at Nor- 
thwestern to honor and 
recognize you for your im- 
portant role in the success of 
the University." 



r 



Sketchy Details 
l 

An NSU student gets her 
caricature drawn by Andrew 
Callahan of Caricatures 
Unlimited in the Union lobby 
last Thursday. 

Callahan was one of the 
individuals present at the 
SAB Hurry Party, the group's 
annual membership drive. 



I 




History Society Wins National Award 



Northwestern has won the 
Best Chapter Award for 1 983- 
84 in nationwide competition 
sponsored by Phi Alpha Theta, 
the international student honor 
society in history. 

Northwestern's Pi chapter 
and the Eta-Lambda chapter at 
Case-Western Reserve 
University in Cleveland tied for 
the top honor in the category 
covering universities with 
enrollments from 3.000 to 
8,000 students. 



Dr. Maxine Taylor, professor 
and chairman of the Depart- 
ment of History, Social 
Sciences and Social Work, 
said the chapter will be given 
the full award of $250 worth 
of library books to be selected 
by the history staff and Pi 
chapter members. 



Mary Linn Wernet of 
Vencennes, Ind., who 
currently is on the State Ar- 
chives staff in Baton Rouge, 
was president of Pi chapter 
last year as a graduate student 

Will Run Oct. 12-16 



in history. The chapter's 
advisor is Dr. James Mc- 
Corkle, professor of history. 

Northwestern's selection as 
a Phi Alpha Theta Best 



Chapter Award winner was 
based on chapter activities, 
operation of the chapter and 

activity by Northwestern 
history faculty members. 



Cast Chosen for 'Cuckoo's Nest' 



One Flew Over the 
Cuckoo's Nest is the Nor- 
thwestern Theatre's fall 
semester production that will 
begin October 12 and run 
through October 16. 

The cast, directed by Ray 
Schexnider, includes Nor- 
thwestern faculty such as Gail 
Lewis and Tony Smith. Some 
roles have been filled by 
students of the Louisiana 
Shcool like Trevor Dean, 
Steve Toliver, Scott 



Nicholson, and Stephen 
Speight. 

The remaining cast is either 
fresh talent or familiar faces 
returning to do another NSU 
performance. 

They are Robert Guy, Britt 
Salim, Ruth Woods, Jack 
Dowell, Laverne McLamore, 
Ronald Turner, Bob Burkhead, 
Frank Morris, Jerome and 
Johnny Cox, Ben Carter, Mel 
Lee, Sam Alex, and Jeaniene 
Broussard. 



"The scene takes places in 
a ward in a state mental 
hospital and deals with ideals 
like humanity, lack of freedom, 
and those who have lost the 
will to live," explains Sam 
Allen, a Northwestern Theatre 
major who portrays the 
character Candy Starr, "the 
nurses dictate every 
movement mad by the heavily 
sedated patients and this 
hamper's the patients' 
creativity and imagination." 




ppnifum MiinfE 



— 





Vol. 73, No. 5 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Sept. 18,1984 



News 



3 



Student Engineers Hosting Convocation 



Northwestern student 
chapter of the Institute of 
Electrical - Electronic 
Engineers is sponsoring "The 
Second Century Begins," a 
centennial technical con- 
vocation commemorating the 
100th anniversary of the 
Institute of Electrical- Elec- 
tronic Engineers. 

The session will feature 



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Bernard Oliver, the principal 
speaker, who recently retired 
from the position of Vice 
President for Research and 
Development for Hewlett- 
Packard Company. Panelists 
will ..be Charles H. Towns, 
professor of Physics at the 
University of California; Ed- 
ward David, Jr., president of 
Exxon Research and 
Engineering Company; Alvin 
Toffler, scholar, author, and 
futurist; and Joshua Leder- 
berg, president of Rockfeller 
University. 

The convocation is being 
sent live, via satellite from the 
Franklin Institute to IEEE 



RESEARCH PAPERS 



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sections in the United States 
and Canada. 

The times will be Monday, 
October 8 at 7:30 p.m. The 
place will be the auditorium in 
Kyser Hall. 

Raymond Christensen, 
associate professor of 



electronics, states, "the public 
who has an interest in the 
electrical or electronic fields 
are invited to attend. There 
will be no admission charges." 

Winn Electronics is fur- 
nishing the satellite pickup 
antenna and equipment. 



Tri-Sig Hits Ceiling 



Sigma Sigma Sigma is now 
the largest sorority at NSU 
after reaching ceiling (the 
highest number of girls a 
chapter may have) during fall 
rush. 

Alpha Zeta Chapter of Sigma 
Sigma Sigma initiated Lisa 
Cote, Lisa Howell, Lori Rachal, 
Kathy Shafer, and Teressa 



U.S.News & World Report presents 

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i WORLD Re PORT 



"ithomas. 

New pledges for 1984 fall 
session are Robyn Andrews, 
Leesville; Chrissey Bailey, 
Natchtioches; Kim Cooley, 
DeRidder; Melissa Cox, 
Natchitoches; Linda Doll, 
Natchitoches; Jennifer 
Douglas, Leesville; Lisa Elkins, 
Natchitoches; Tracy Fisher, 
Venice, Fla.; Pam Gardner, 
Coushatta; Linda Harrison, 
Mansfield; Cathy Jackson, Ft. 
Polk; Yevette Jordan, Florien; 
Mona Leger, Opelousas; 
Donna Lewis, Leesville; 
Colleen Lynch; Natchtioches; 
Cindy McAbee, Ft. Recover, 
Ohio; Kristy Peeples, 
Shreveport; Paula Ray, 
Natchitoches; Patti Smiley, 
Pelham; Gena Kay Williams, 
Natchitoches; Paula Woodall, 
Jamestown. N.C.; and 
Charlotte Zumwalt, Coushatta. 

Harlan Harvey, Tri-Sigma's 
1 983 Man of the Year, signed 
with the Mike Beatty Modeling 
Agency in Dallas, Tex. 

Pledge Chrissey Bailey is 
the first runner-up and 
swimsuit winner in the Miss 
Natchitoches Pageant, and 
Eileen Haynes was recently 
named as Kappa Alpha Rose. 



Parkway Cinema IV 
In Natchitoches 

IS NOW OPEN 



Box Office Opens 
At 6:30 Weeknights 
1:30 Weekends. 



All Seats $ 2 00 
On Saturday Afternoon 
And Tuesday Night 

Free Popcorn With 
This Ad. 
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4» _J 



NEWS 
BRIEFS 



DPMA MEETING 
THURSDAY 

The Data Processing and 
Management Association 
will hold its first meeting 
Thursday, September 20 at 
3:00 p.m. in the Business 
Building. 

People majoring in 
Computer Science and 
other related majors are 
welcomed to join. 

Tentative plans will be 
made at this time for up- 
coming field trios. 

NOON ALTERNATIVE 
SCHEDULED 

i 

This week's Thursday 
Noon Alternative will begin 
serving lunch at 1 1 :30 a.m. 
until 1:00 p.m. for fifty 
cents. . 

Speakers vfi" continue on 
the topic of Alternative 
Lifestyles. 

Holy Communion will be 
Wednesday night, at 8:30 
p.m., in the Wesley Chapel, 
520 College Avenue. 



SGA BEGINS 
YEAR 

Last spring Tod Klotz^ 
bach was elected as SGA 
president for the 1 984-85 
year. Other officers are 
Shawn Wyble, Vice- 
president; Cindy Ernst, 
secretary; Jon Robbins, 
treasurer; Dane Broussard, 
Commissioner of Elections; 
and Emilyn Matthews, 
Parlimentarian. 

Cabinet members are 
Sharon Sampite, director of 
student life; Mignona Cote, 
^director of public relations; 
Tommy -^Abrusely, director 
of legal rights; and Amy 
Viator, director of 
Shreveport relations. 

Senators-at-Large are 
Christy Dickey, Eileen 
Haynes, Tim Jacobs, Dan 
Kratz, Chris Maggio, Jim 
Martin, Beth McMillan, 
Tommy Moore, John 
Mouser; Carla Roberts, and 
Jodi Werfal. 

Class senators are Jeff 
Eversull, Donna Jo Kelly, 
Lynn Nicolle, Sylvester 
Roque, and Leah Sherman. 

Special recognition was 
given to the Demon Band 
by Tod Klotzback at the 
September 1 0th meeting. 




Some things speak for themselves 





DEMON 

DYNAMITE 



This Weekend Will Be A 'Blast' 



Northwestern is often called 
a "suitcase college," with its 
students packing up and 
leaving for home on 
weekends. 

Starting Saturday however, 
Demon athletic officials hope 
to change that by planning to 
"blast" students into Turpin 
Stadium. 

"Demon Dynamite" is the 
theme for the athletic 
department's 1 984 football 
promotion, a drive not only 
designed to bring alumni and 
parents to Natchitoches, but 
to keep students on campus 
instead of going home for the 
weekend. 

The key, according to Nan 
Holmes, creator of Demon 



Dynamite, is a series of events 
on Friday and Saturday. 

Friday afternoon's 
"blowout" is similar to a pep 
rally. After the blowout there 
will be a happy hour - "attitude 
adjustment" - in Union Station. 

"Blast" kicks off the day on 
Saturday with intramural 
competition. Then comes 
"TNT." 

"There will be food, en- 
tertainment, etc.," said 
Holmes. "It is family-type get- 
together." 

To push Demon Dynamite, 
NSU will take a "SAM" attack 
into area high schools. SAM, 
which is also the first name of 
Head Coach Sam Goodwin, 
stands for strong and mighty. 



The attack will feature the 
Demon mascot, cheerleaders, 
and NSU tailbacks, 
noseguards, and tackles. 

In conjunction with Demon 
Dynamite, there is a name-the- 
Demon contest and bumper 
sticker promotion. 

The promotion "can't help 
but help," said coach 
Goodwin. "It should get the 
students involved, and that's 
what we are here to do." 

School officials are also 
hoping attendance will pick up 
at the four home games this 
year. For the past for years, 
the Demons have averaged 
between 37,000 and 42,000 
fans per season. 

The team opens at home 



this weekend against the 
Abilene Christian Wildcats. 
Then comes a road trip to rival 
NLU. 

On October 6, the 
University celebrates its 
100th birthday and the 
football team meets GSC pre- 
season favorite Southwest 
Texas in Turpin. 

Nicholls State follows at 
home on Thursday, Oct. 1 1 , 
with the State Fair game with 
Tech on the following 
Saturday. The Demons play 
another Thursday night game 
on Oct. 25 against Sam 
Houston before playing their 
final three games on the road - 
at USM, Southeastern, and 
Stephen F. Austin. 




Dynamite Begins Friday 



Demon Dynamite's activities 
begin Friday at 4:30 with the 
"Attitude Adjustment" hour in the 
Union Station. 

Food and drinks will be sold, 
and many prizes will be given 
away. Contests that will be held 
are a best legs contest for girls 
and a chest contest for men. A 
balloon toss, coke chugging, and 
best original cheer will also win 
prizes. Prizes for contests range 
from gift certificates to com- 
plimentary pizzas from Dominos. 
Fifty Miller painters' caps will be 
given away as door prizes, and 
25 roll ticket prizes, such as a 
Guys and Gals travel set, stadium 
cushion setas, and luncheon 
specials. 

Dynamite activities begin at 
7:00. There will be a disc 



jockey, and several tournaments, 
from bowling to video games, 
will be offered. Miller ice chests 
will be given to the first 25 
people, with pizzas or six-packs 
awarded to tournament winners. 
A drawing for a bicycle will also 
be held. 

The events continue at 1 1 :00 
on Saturday with the intramural 
Blast on the football practice 
field. The winners will receive 
Demon Dynamite t-shirts. 
Second place winners will 
receive visors, with mugs going 
to third place finishers. 

TNT - tailgating 'n Turpin - will 
follow the Blast. Cotton Patch 
has donated vinyl TNT bags, 
which will be filled with surprises 
and passed out to cars in the 
parking lot. The bottom part of 
the bag can be redeemed at 
Cotton Patch for an NSU Demon 
Dynamite mug. 





Tailgate-N-Turpin wiii 
begin at noon Saturday in 
the stadium parking lots. 
Tailgating simply means 
that everyone should bring 
their cars to Turpin and park 
for the game. Open your 
trunks and BBQ, grill 
hamburgers or steaks, or 
just eat sandwiches. The 
main idea, though, is — 
Party! 

The party is in Turpin 
before the Demons' battle 
with Abilene Christian. 



NORTHWESTERN 
ATHLETES 



Sept. 18, 1984 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Vol. 73, No. 5 



6 



Sports 



Goodwin: The Best Didn't Win At Angelo 



And may the best team win. 

While that statement is used 
to begin many a contest, it 
wasn't what Coach Goodwin 
felt after the Northwestern 
football team fell to 0-2 on the 
season with a 10-7 loss at 
Angelo State two weekends 
ago. 

"I thought the best team got 
beat," stated Goodwin after 
viewing films of the second 
straight three point loss for his 
team. "Our defense really 
played well except for one 
drive, but our offense was 
inconsistent. Overall I just 
think we have a better football 
team." 

Goodwin no doubt would 
like to play the final period 
again, this time with the 
services of starting quar- 
terback Wayne Van, who left 
in the third period with a 
shoulder separation. 

"Not having Wayne in there 
hurt us in the final period," 
admitted Goodwin. "Neither 
Rob Fabrizio or Claude Brown 
have any game experience." 
The Angelo State defense 
took advantage of four pass 



interceptions in the final 
period, often using a strong 
rush to force bad passes, to 
score a final minute field goal 
in the 10-7 win. 

"In the second half we 
moved the ball offensively," 
added Goodwin, "Except for 
the interceptions. "Our line 
play was inconsistent. I didn't 
think our running backs ran as 
well as they did the first week. 
John Stephens had some 
great plays, but he also had 
some where he could have 
done better. One thing, he 
always gives a super effort." 

Goodwin saved most of his 
praise for the Demon defense, 
which allowed Angelo State 
just 50 yards rushing and just 
.208 total yards on the night. 
"I can't think of one player on 
defense that didn't have a 
good game," said Goodwin. 
"They're a fun group to watch 
because of the way they play. 
James Hall had a great night. 
Robert Moore, Freddy Smith 
and Larry Robinson all had 
some big plays for us and 
Earnest Crittenden had a very 
consistent performance." 



Demon Profiles 




MIKE CROW 

Mike Crow punter for the 

Demons, is a sophomore 
Wildlife Management major 
from Little Rook. Las', year 
Crow stepped in as a rookie 
and handled all tr,e puvting 
for the Demons. He tied an 
NSU record cf 65 f unts in a 
sirgle seescn ar.d ranks 
3rd for yards puited in a 
season. Crow has the sixth 
longest punt in Denon 
history for 56 yards against 
Abiline Christian last 
season. This season, Crow 
is ranked 4th in the Gulf 
Star Conference with a 
puntng average of 36.7 
yarcs. 

CAREER STATISTICS 

G NO • YDS AVG LNG 

II 65 2568 39.6 68 



ROY FONTENOT 

Fioy Fontenot, se: lior 
frcm Lake Charles, is 'he 
Dtmon flanker. Fonte.iot 
h&s led the Demons in both 
punt and kickoff returns for 
the past three years. A i a 
sophomore at NSU he \A.as 
ranked nationally with an 
11.1 yard average on pi nt 
returns. Fontenot is a grt.at 
asset to the Demons and he 
is someone to watch in the 
upcoming games. 

CAREER STATISTICS 

PUNT RfcTllRNS 

NP YDS TP I NG 

N «• 

13 j.-vt 48 
20 J81__ I 28 



434 



48 



U 



65 



2568 



39 5 



68 



KICKOFF RETURNS 

NO. YDS TD LNG 

12 132 1 65 
23 i. 265 73 

21 " 139 33_ 

.56 . 526," 1 73 



After falling behind with just 
33 seconds left in the game, 
Goodwin felt his team wasn't 
given a chance to come back. 
The Demons took over on 
their r 47 and Fabrizio hit 
Roy ' .itenot for a 13 yard 
gain on first down. From there 
two incompletions and the 



final interception of the night 
sealed the Ram win. 

"I thought we had two plays 
at the end where pass in- 
terference should have been 
called," added Goodwin of the 
incompletions. "But the of- 
ficials didn't call anything all 
night. I've never seen a team 



do so much holding and not 
have it called." 

Last weekend off should 
give Van's injured shoulder 

time to heal. "We should have 
everybody healthy for the 



Abilene game, 
Goodwin. 



concluded 



as 



Asserr^ 

, keeP 'mat. ^ d , a - 
like done 1 -Sport' . 




Oil 



tear" 



listing 



al 



lN vt : 



sou 




Abilene Christian (1-1) at Northwestern (0-2) 



Mascot: Demons 
Enrollment: 6,500 (est.) 
Colors: Purple, white, and orange 
Location: Natchitoches, LA 
Founded: 1884 
Conference: Gulf Star 
Affiliation: NCAA Div. I-AA 
1983 record: 4-7 





Mascot: Wildcats 
Enrollment: 4,630 
Colors: Purple and white 
Location: Abilene, TX 
Founded: 1906 
Conference: Lone Star 
Affiliation: NCAA Div. II 
1983 Record: 7-3 



Saturday night, 7:00 p.m. - Turpin Stadium 



Tootie 



For her, Intramurals are a way of life 



A familiar face in intramurals, 
Diana "Tootie" Cary is now in 
her fourth year as director of 
the intramural program at 
Northwestern. 

For Cary, being intramural 
director is more than an eight 



hours-a-day, five day-a-week 
job. 

"Because I don't have a 
secretary, I have to be here at 
eight to open up for my 
workers." During the day, she 
gets ready for afternoon 



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events and makes out tour- 
nament brackets and work 
schedules. 

"The best part about this job 
is being with the students and 
working with them on a daily 
basis -- getting to know them 
by their first names. This year 
I'm really excited because 
there are a whole lot of new 
faces and this year the dorms 
are getting more involved in 
intramurals." 

Through the years, there are 
plenty of. people and events to 
remember. 

"A couple of years ago 
during basketball season this 
fraternity team came out on 
the court to play and they all 
were wearing their jockstraps 
on the outside of their gym 
shorts — that was really 
funny." 

But with the good also 
comes the bad. The least 
enjoyable part of Cary's job is 
"having teams protest the 
eligibility of players. Football 
and basketball causes the 
most arguments because they 
are such contact sports. If 
those were in the same 
semester, I wouldn't be able to 
take it," she laughed. 

Athletics have always been 
a big part of her life. In her 
undergraduate days at 
Northwestern, Cary was a 
four-year starter for the Lady 
Demon basketball team. 

After graduating with a 
bachelor's degree in physical 
education, Cary played 
professional basketball for two 
months with the Houston 
Angels. 

Her long-range plans still 
involve athletics." My ultimate 
goal is to coach basketball on 
the college level. Because it is 
so hard to get a job nowadays, 
I hesitate to leave Nor- 
thwestern. I like my job - I'm 
happy here. Northwestern has 
been good to me, but I know 
that one day I'll have to leave." 

But for the moment, Diana 
Cary can be found wherever 
intramural events are hap- 
pening. 




Angelo Rams A Demon 

An unidentified Demon runner finds himself "ram- 
sacked" in Northwestern 's 10-7 loss at Angelo State two 
weekends ago. The Demons were off on Saturday in 
preparation for the Abilene Christian game. 

Scoreboard 



This week's opponents, the 
Wildcats of Abilene Christian 
University, will march into 
Turpin Stadium with a 1-1 
mark, while the Demons are 0- 
2. NSU had an open date last 
weekend. 

ACU fell to Montana, 42-28, 
two weeks ago to open the 
season. The 'Cats evened 
their record on Saturday with a 
27-7 win over hapless Nor- 
thern Colorado, a team which 
Air Force Academy trampled 
the week before by a score of 
75-7. 

Northwestern opened three 
weeks ago at McNeese, 
where the Cowboys upset the 
slightly-favored Demons, 17- 
14. NSU dropped its second 
game, at Angelo State, two 
Saturdays ago when the Rams 
kicked a last-minute field goal 
to give them a 1 0-7 triumph. 



LSU 47, Wichita State 7 

The Fightin' Tigers raised 
their record to 1-0-1, while 
the Shockers slipped to 0-3. 

USM 34, LA Tech 

Southern Mississippi im- 
proved to 1-1 after a season- 
opening loss to Georgia, while 
Tech fell to 1 -2 on the year. 

Northeast 7, USL 6 

NLU improved to 3-0, while 
USL dropped to 1-2. 



Angelo State 20, Cameron 

ASU climbed to 2-1 , while 
Cameron is now 0-2. 

Miss. College 7, SLU 6 

MC won its first against one 
loss, while SLU fell to 0-3. 

McNeese 24, Nicholls 21 

The Cowboys are now 3-0, 
while Nicholls dropped to 0-3. 



Sept. 18, 1984 



CURRENT SAUCE 



Vol. 73, No. 5 



8 



Viewpoint 



with just about 
The construction 
semester began to 



Tar Babies 



Another word from the Demon dictionary: 
"Reroofing - a slow process to put the messiest 
and worst smelling substances possible on the 
roofs of Northwestern's habitable buildings." 

Two years ago, the hail storm hit Natchitoches, 
providing insurance companies with massive 
headaches and most of the city with new cars. It also 
damaged several of NSU's buildings. 

Finally, the buildings are finally being repaired. Of 
course, there is a slight problem. (Ever noticed there 
is always a "slight problem' 
everything at Northwestern?) 
companies waited until the fall 
start their work on the buildings. 

While it was quiet (actually, 'dead' is a better word) 
during the summer session, it has picked up con- 
siderably. Now it is anything but quiet, especially on 
the fourth floor of Kyser. 

In my 11 :00 TT class, not only does the subject 
matter -- foreign language -- tend to confuse me, but 
now I have to listen to what sounds like two hippos 
breakdancing on the roof. The entire classroom 
literally shakes. Every few seconds, the entire class 
winces as small particles swirl from the ceiling. Any 
day now, I'm half-expecting a workman to drop in - 
literally - for a quick Spanish lesson. 

Quiet Riot has nothing on Kyser Hall's work crew. 
These guys are loud. Because of all the noise, I've 
now learned to read lips in class. Before, all I had to 
do was listen. Now, I actually have to watch since I 
can't hear anything. 

Even worse than the noise is the smell. Instead of 
catching interesting aromas from the Union cafeteria, 
we get the now-familiar smell of tar. And with the 
smell comes a headache. Taking two aspirins has 
now become a part of my daily routine. And to top it 
all off, the barrels are leaking. Big splotches of tar 
(like the one near the post office) aren't going to 
blend in with the rest of the campus very well. 

Northwestern never ceases to amaze me. The 
materials have been sitting on campus since the 
summer session. It seems strange that the day 
students return, the ole tar machines get cranked. 
What a nice way to be welcomed back to school.... 




John Ramsey 



Letter to the Editor 



Dear Editor: 

On Nov. 6, we will be af- 
forded the opportunity to 
exercise our right to the 
franchise. That many of us will 
not participate in the 
Presidental election by not 
casting our vote is of serious 
consequences. Many of us 
choose an attitude of apathy 
towards the elections simply 
because we feel our vote is of 
little importance. We are 
fortunate to live in a nation 
where our politicians are 
nominated through popular 



vote. In past elections there 
were various issues which 
were extremely important; 
however, our generation is 
confronted with the possibility 
of destroying a civilization -- no 
other generation has had this 
ability. So, express your views 
and begin by exercising your 
right to the franchise. By not 
voting we have come to the 
conclusion before the votes 
have been counted . 
Daniel Olmsted 
Junior history major 



JOSHY D0e5NT WANT 
ANOTHER CRACKGR .... 
OOSHY WAMTS A 

eFFecTive LAXATive ! ' 




?) 1984 Universal Press Syndicate 



Current Quotes 

If you did not attend Northwestern, what school 
would you go to? 




Sam Allen 

Sophomore 

Theater 

Shreveport 

"SMU. They've got a great 
theater department and Dallas 
is my favorite city. There's a 
lot of rich kids there." 



Babatunde Obayan 

Senior 

Public Relations 
Lagos, Nigeria 

"Texas. It's a better 
school— better programs and 
more funding. UT is more 
expensive than NSU; 




Phillip Ebarb 
Freshamn 
Health & PE 
Vinton 

"LSU. That's where all 
friends go. It's got a 
education department, 
NSU is still the best." 



my 
good 
but 



Kevin Nix 

Freshman 

Wildlife MgU Law Enf. 
Baton Rouge 

"I wouldn't go anywhere 
else. I'm here because my 
wife goes here. She made 
me." 



Current 
Sauce 
Staff 

USPS 140-660 



John Ramsey 
Editor 

Lisa Williams 
Managing Editor • 

Stacy Scroggins 
Business Manager 

Lucy LeBlanc 
Darlene Winslow 
Advertising 

Kim Nolde 
Sports Editor 

Robin J. Gunter 
News Editor 

Bubba Soileau 
Entertainment 

Scott Cox 
Bryan Williams 
Gena Williams 
News Staff 

Russel Bienvenu 
Circulation Manager 

Kevin Hopkins 
Don Pearce 
Darlene Winsiow 
Shawn Wyble 
Photographers 

Peter Minder 
Adviser 

Current Sauce is 
published weekly by 
students of Northwestern 
State University of 
Louisiana. It is student- 
run and financed, and is 
not associated with any of 
the University's colleges 
or departments. Staff 
members are selected by 
the Editor, with the ap- 
proval of the Student 
Media Board. 

Editorial and business 
offices are located at 
225A Kyser Hall. Office 
hours are 1-4 p.m. 
Tuesday through Friday. 
The telephone number is 
(318)357-5456. 

All correspondence 
should be brought by the 
office or mailed to Box 
5306, NSU, Natchitoches, 
LA 71497. Deadline for 
both advertising and copy 
is 1 p.m. on the Thursday 
preceding Tuesday 
publication. 



Sept. 25,1984 
Vol. 73, No. 6 



NEWS 
BRIEFS 

WINNFIELD 
EXHIBIT REFLECTS 
NSU HISTORY 

The "Celebration of a 
Century" photographic 
exhibit reflecting the 100- 
year history of NSU is on 
display Wednesday, Sept. 
26, at the Winn Parish 
Library in Winnfield. 

The exhibit may be 
viewed at the library, which 
is located at 204 West 
Main Street, from 8:30 
a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday 
through Friday and from 
8:30 a.m. to noon on 
Saturdays. 

POLITICAL FORUM 
SLATED FOR 
THURSDAY 

A political forum will be 
held on campus Thursday. 
Local candidates for the 
September 29th election 
will be present. 

Jim Martin was elected 
President Pro-temp during 
the September 1 9 meeting. 

All organizations using 
student fees must turn their 
budget forms in by October 
8. 

A three-day blood drive 
will be held Tuesday 
through Thursday in the 
Union Ballroom. Nor- 
thwestern is competing 
with La. Tech and the 
winner will be announced 
during the State Fair Game 
on Oct. 20. In addition to 
the competition against La. 
Tech, organizations on 
campus are urged to 
compete with each other, 
also. 

KAPPA SIGMA 
PLEDGES TWO 

Kappa Sigma's two 
newest pledges are John 
Brittain and Phillip Ebarb. 
The fall pledge class now 
numbers 22. 

Another semi-annual 
pajama party was hosted by 
the Sigs for Phi Mu sorority 
two weeks ago, and last 
Thurscay the Kappa Sigs 
kicked off the Demon 
Dynamite weekend with a 
Party at the Student Body. 

Kappa Sig brother Tony 
Hernandez was recently 
hired by NSU as a 

recruiter/admissions coun- 
selor. 

This weekend, the NSU 
Sigs will travel by bus to 
Northeast for the Demon- 
ndian football game, to be 
followed by a after-the- 
game party with the NLU 
yKappa Sigmas. 



Arthur Reigns As Queen 



Susan Arthur was selected yesterday to 
reign as the Queen for next Saturday's cen- 
tennial homecoming festivities. 

Serving on the homecoming court will be 
Susan Combest, Cindy Ernst, Theresa Guillory, 
Eileen Haynes, Melissa Hightower, Yevette 
Jordan, Carmel Preyan, and Amy Whitford. 

The queen and her court will be presented at 
the Northwestern-Southwest Texas State 
football game next Saturday in Turpin Stadium. 
Game time is 2 p.m. 

SGA also held class senatorial elections 
yesterday. All four classes will have runoff 
elections next Wednesday, the same day the 
State Fair Court will be chosen. 

Results of the senior class race were: Donna 
Jo Kelly, 81 ; Brunetta Anthony, 57; and Henry 
Maggio, 55. All three will be in the runoff. 

Juniors class results are: Greg Shoalmire, 



35; Frank Morris, 30; Paula Simmons, 28; 
Tommy Moore, 27; Lynn Nicolle, 21; and 
Stacy Scroggins, 1 8. The top four candidates 
advance to the runoff. 

Sophomores voted: Jeff Eversull, 61; 
Johnny Cox, 54; Jerome Cox, 47; Sylvester 
Roque, 37; and David Silver, 9. All but Silver 
will be in next week's final round. 

Freshman class results are: "Brother Dave" 
Decuir, 76; Charlotte Zumwalt, 58; Donna 
Lewis, 55; Bryan K. Williams, 36; Ron Askew, 
35; Clay Williams, 32; and Dan Medlin, 27. 
Decuir, Zumwalt, Lewis, and Williams will be in 
the runoff. 

In the race for Commissioner of Elections, 
vacated earlier by Stacy Baumgardner, Dane 
Broussard won the election over Leah Sher- 
man, 280-202. 




Susan Arthur 
1984 Homecoming Queen 



Current Sauce 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 

NATCHITOCHES, LA 



Celebration Of A Century, 1884-1984 



Natchitoches Enrollment At 3, 781 



Campus Enrollment Climbs 13 Percent 




f. 



Number One 

The Demon, was selected this summer as the best college 
mascot at the National Cheerleader Assocation's week-long 
camp at Southern Methodist University. At SMU, The 
Demon's character and antics were videotaped for a 
segment television commentator Al McGuire will present 
during the NBC network's coverage of the 1985 college 
basketball season. 



NSU's fall semester 
enrollment is 6,178 which 
includes a 13.5 increase in 
students registered on the 
university's Natchitoches 
campus. 

Dr. Ray Baumgardner, 
registrar, said drops in 
enrollment at the Fort Polk and 
Shreveport campuses "as a 
result of factors that were 
well-known before registration 
kept the University from 
having a substantial enrollment 
increase over last year." 

Enrollment at Fort Polk 
declined from 834 last year to 
710 this fall. The decrease in 
registration was anticipated 
because of military maneuvers 
away from the base that in- 
volve nearly 9,000 Fort Polk 
personnel. 

Baumgardner said, "A 
number of soldiers who have 
been enrolled at the Fort Polk 
campus in the past are 
engaged in the military 
exercises but will return to the 
base in time to register for the 
second session of the fall 
semester. It is for that reason 
that we are projecting an 
enrollment increase over last 
year when final figures are 
compiled.'' 

Northwestern also had a 
substantial decline in 
enrollment at the Shreveport 
nursing campus as a result of 
space limitations and 
restrictions on enrollment for 
accreditation reasons. The 
Shreveport enrollment 
dropped from 1,075 last year 
to 885 this fall. 

Baumgardner said 
enrollment in Shreveport "will 



increase when the new 
nursing facilities are com- 
pleted early next year. There 
is a great demand for ad- 
mission to the nursing school, 
and additional space will 
provide the opportunity for 
expanded enrollment." 

Despite the declines at 
Shreveport and Fort Polk, 
Northwestern's overall 
enrollment this fall is just 94 
less than the 1983 fall 
semester count of 6,272. Of 
the 6, 1 78 students registered 
for the current semester, 
4,549 are undergraduates 
and 1 ,629 are in the Graduate 
School. 

Enrollment on the Nat- 
chitoches campus this fall is 
3,584 with an additional 207 
students registered on other 
campuses taking some 
classes in Natchitoches for a 
total main campus enrollment 
of 3,781 . 

NEXT WEEK: 
Detailed enrollment 
facts and figures 

The main campus 
. registration count of 3,584 is 
a 13.5 percent increase over 
last year's enrollment of 
3,162 on the Natchitoches 
campus. Eighty-two percent 
of the undergraduates on the 
main campus are full-time 
students. 

The fall semester student 
population includes 2,108 
freshmen, 915 sophomores, 
605 juniors and 921 seniors 
See "Enrollment" 
on page four 



z 



CURRENT SAUCE 
Sept. 25, 1984 
Vol. 73, No. 6 



NGW^ 

News 



'The Sun King' Highlight of Excursion 



Fine Arts Trip to New Orleans Planned 



A fine arts trip is being 
offered on Tuesday, Oct. 9, 
for individuals interested in 
viewing "The Sun King: Louis 
XIV and the New World," an 
international traveling 
exhibition at the Louisiana 
State Museum's historic 
Cabildo on Jackson Square in 
New Orleans 

The departments of Art and 
History, Social Science and 



Social Work are co-sponsoring 
the one-day trip, which will 
leave from campus at 7 a.m. 
Participants will return to NSU 
late that night. 

Northwestern students will 
register first for seats on the 
buses. After Oct. 1 , the 
remaining seats will be filled 
with reservations from faculty 
and staff members, their 
spouses, alumni and friends of 



the University. 

The cost of the trip is $20 
per person, which includes 
bus fare, admission to the 
museum and a cassette for a 
self-guided audio tour of the 
exhibition. 

"The Sun King" opened at 
the Cabildo on April 29 and 
will be on display through Nov. 
18 as part of the Louisiana 
World's Exposition. After its 



Chorale Holds Meeting 



The Natchitoches-Northw- 
estern Chorale, a performing 
choral group comprised of 
vocalists from the University 
and the community, held its 
organizational meeting for the 
1984-85 season Sept. 13, at 
NSU. 

Dr. Burt M. Allen, assistant 
professor of voice is beginning 
his second year as conductor 
of the Natchitoches- 
Northwestern Chorale. 

This fall, the chorale will 
perform Mozart's Requiem 
with soloists and orchestra on 
Monday, Nov. 5. This major 
work was the last choral piece 
that Mozart wrote before his 
death. 

NSU Mascot 
Chosen As 
USA's Best 

The Demon mascot was 
recently selected the best 
college mascot at the National 
Cheerleaders Association's 
summer camp at Southern 
Methodist University in Dallas. 

The Demon was one of 
about 40 mascots from 
colleges and universities 
throughout the country who 
participated in the camp, 
which was conducted in 
August. 

He was selected for the 
camp's top honors over 
mascots from such major 
universities as SMU, 
Nebraska, Texas Tech, Rice, 
Tulane, and Oklahoma. 

College and university 
mascots receive intense 
instruction on pantomine, 
individual character 
development, using spirit 
gimmicks, animation with 
stunts, crowd control through 
the use of the uniform and 
character and assistance to 
and enhancement of the 
cheerleader squad. 



Allen said the chorale, also 
will perform a major concert 
during the spring semester. 
Music for the concert will be 
selected at a later date. 

Allen joined the music 
faculty in the fall of 1 983 after 
serving for six years as 
assistant professor of music 
and director of choral activities 
at William Woods College in 
Fulton, Missouri. 

He also served three 
summers on the voice and 
choral staff of the National 
Music Camp four years as 
assistant director of choral 
activities at the University of 
Kansas, and three vears as 



director of vocal music at 
Warren High School in 
Warren, Michigan. 

Allen earned both the 
bachelor's and master's 
degrees in music education at 
Kansas. He received the 
doctorate in conducting from 
Kansas, also. 



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seven-month stay in New 
Orleans, the exhibition will 
move to the Corcoran Gallery 
in Washington, D.C., where it 
will be viewed from December 
through April. 

More than 200 fabulous 
works of art are assembled in 
the historic Cabildo, where trip 
participants will see paintings, 
furniture, ceramics and other 
treasures, many of which are 
being shown outside France 
for the first time. 

The exhibition is divided into 
three sections: "Louis the 
Man, "Louis and the Fine and 
Performing Arts," and "Louis 
and the Colonies." 

In the section about "Louis 
the Man," gallery displays 



offer insight into Louis XIV's 
family and advisors, such as 
Cardinal Mazarin. Painting of 
the king, his family and 
confidants reveal the diverse 
aspects of his world. 

From elaborate gilded 
furniture to formal portraits by 
the era's most famous 
painters, the exhibition offers 
a glimpse into a remarkable 
moment in art history. 

Portraits, maps, and objects 
trace the exploration of 
French Louisiana in the 
section about "Louis and the 
Colonies." 

Tickets may be purchased 
and reservations obtained by 
calling Dr. Dean F. Johnson at 
357-6850. 



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• Dry Rock Sauna 

• Diet & Nutritional Counsel 

• Pro-Shop/ Juice Bar 

• Swimming Pool/Sundeck 



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Natchitoches 

357 9560 



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News 



CURRENT SAUCE 
Sept. 25,1984 
Vol. 73, No. 6 



Greek Pictures 
Begin Tuesday 



Greek individual pictures for 
the 1 985 Potpourri yearbook 
will be taken on Tuesday, Oct. 
2, and Wednesday, Oct. 3, 
from 6:30-9 p.m. 

According to Skip Waters, 
greek editor, a $1 fee per 
person is required to offset 
the photographer's expenses. 

Waters added that mem- 
bership rosters should be sent 
to the Potpourri office at Kyser 
Hall 227. 

The schedule for Tuesday, 
Oct. 2, is: 

Alpha Kappa Alpha, 6:30; 
Alpha Phi Alpha, 6:40; Zeta 



Phi Beta, 6:50; Kappa Alpha, 
7:00; Delta Zeta, 7:30; Delta 
Sigma Theta, 7:35; Phi Beta 
Sigma, 7:50; Kappa Sigma, 
8:00; and Phi Mu, 8:30. 



Wednesday's 
includes: 



schedule 



Sigma Kappa, 6:30; Sigma 
Sigma Sigma, 6:50; Kappa 
Alpha Psi, 7:20; Omega Psi 
Phi, 7:30; Sigma Tau Gamma, 
7:40; Tau Kappa Epsilon, 
8:10; and Theta Chi, 8:40. 

All greek individual pictures 
will be taken on the third floor 
of the Union. 



MAGGIO'S 
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Headquarters 

Two Locations: 

230 Highway South 
725 Amulet Street 




"Regency" 

"Regency," a five-member a cappella vocal group, will appear in Union Station Thur- 
sday at 7 p.m. The performance is being sponsored by the Student Activities Board Fine 
Arts Committee and is the second professional act in Union Station this semester. 
Nominated for 1984 Entertainer of the Year, "Regency" has a repertoire featuring music 
from the 30's to the music of today. 

Full-time Northwestern students will be admitted free to the performance upon 
presentation of their current NSU identification cards. 

The next SAB-sponsored event in Union Station will be singer Chip Franklin, who will 
kick off Homecoming Week with a performance on October 3 at 8 p.m. 



Not all fraternities are social 



Sigma Alpha lota and Phi Mu 
Alpha Sinfonia have been 
fraternities at Northwestern 
since about 1940. Unlike 
most NSU fraternities, they 
are not social--they are 
musical. 

Sigma Alpha lota, founded 
nationally in 1903, is a 
women's music fraternity that 
aims to promote musical in- 
terest and understanding in 
American and foreign 
countries, and to help music 
students and musicians 
uphold the highest ideals of a 
musical education. 

Northwestern's Beta lota 
chapter has eight members. 
The requirements are to 
maintain a 3.0 in all music 



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courses and a 2.0 in all other 
acedemic classes. 

Any serious musician in- 
terested in bettering their 
musical knowledge and 
performance can join. 

To fulfill the requirements to 
become initiated each pledge 
must get a total of 400 points 
from members and alumni by 
being able to answer 
questions about the fraternity. 

The pledge fee is ten dollars 
and fall fees are twenty dollars 
plus the cost of a badge, 
which varies. 

Sigma Alpha lota accepts 
the responsiblities and 
privileges of being a leader in 
the pursuit of music creation, 
performance, and scholarship. 

Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia is a 
male fraternity which seeks to 
promote music through 
education and research, and 
to bring awareness to the 
public. 

Each semester Phi Mu 
Alpha has a 'smoker' for in- 
terested musicians. 



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NSU's chapter now has 21 
members, a 300 percent 
increasse from last year's 
total. 

This fraternity is not just for 
music majors but for all types 
of musicians or anyone who 
wants to share a common 
interest. They look for men 
who enjoy music from 
classical to rock. 

When men are to be initiated 
a camp-out is organized where 
the history is told and pledges 
are asked why they want to 
join. 

Dues are thirty-five dollars a 
semester which is divided 
between the national 
organization and the chapter 
itself. 

Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia also 
uses differen* themes and 
composed pieces from 
-chapter members at one 
performance each year. 

Both fraternities offer 
musicians a chance to ex- 
press themselves with other 
musicians that have common 
ideas. 



4" 
4 



CURRENT SAUCE 
Sept. 25,1984 
Vol. 73, No. 6 



News 
News 



Sig Tau Begins House Construction Monday 



In 1 979, Sigma Tau Gamma 
was one of Northwestern's 
larger fraternities before the 
fraternity sold its residential 
house on Cypress Street. The 
following fall, the fraternity had 
fallen to just five members. 

Five years later, Sig Tau is 



on the rebound. Now the 
chapter has 1 5 actives and 1 3 
pledges, and on Monday will 
break ground on their new 
chapter house on Greek Hill. 

' "The house has no set 
completion date, since we 



Normal Class off '34 
Planning HC Reunion 



The 50th anniversary 
reunion for the 1934 
graduating class of Louisiana 
State Normal College, is 
scheduled for Oct. 5-6 in 
conjunction with NSU's 
Centennial Homecoming 
Celebration. 

Velma Wall Knowles of 
Longview, Tex., who is 
coordinating the reunion, said 
the special event will be 
highlighted by a luncheon at 
12:30 p.m. at the Nat- 
chitoches Holiday Inn on 
Friday, Oct. 5. Cost of the 
luncheon is $4.95 per person. 

Knowles said special room 
rates at the Natchitoches 
Holiday Inn have been made 
available for '34 graduates 
desiring overnight ac- 
commodations. 

She added that any 
members of the classes of 



1 930 through 1 939 and their 
spouses are invited to par- 
ticipate in the event. 

In addition to the lucheon, 
reunion participants also may 
attend Friday's Centennial 
Convocation at 1 a.m. in the 
Fine Arts Auditorium and the 
Country Supper at 7:30 p.m. 
at the Recreation Complex. 

Activities on Saturday, Oct. 
6, the actual date of Nor- 
thwestern's founding in 1 884, 
include Homecoming 
registration at 10 a.m. in 
Varnado Hall, the 
Homecoming parade at 1 
a.m., the Centennial luncheon 
at 11:45 a.m. in the Union 
ballroom, the football game 
with Southwest Texas at 2 
p.m. in Turpin Stadium, 
numerous post-game 
receptions, and the spec- 
tacular Centennial Ball at 9 
p.m. in Prather Coliseum. 



Enrollment... 



Continued from 
page one 

in addition to the 1,629 
graduate students. 

President Dr. Joseph Orze 
said the primary reason for the 
Natchitoches campus 
enrollment increase "was the 
substantial increase in the 
number of freshmen 
registering at the University 
for the first time." 

He called the stable un- 
dergraduate enrollment, the 
large freshman class and the 
increase in students on the 
mairi campus "positive and 
encouraging indications that 
the University's enrollment has 
not only stabilized but is at the 
threshold of healthy growth." 



Orze said the declines at 
Fort Polk and Shreveport "will 
be reversed in the spring 
semester when the nursing 
building is completed and then 
the military maneuvers end. 
Those anticipated increases, 
combined with the effective 
and progressive recruitment 
programs that have expanded 
the main campus enrollment, 
should give the University 
significant enrollment in- 
creases during the next year." 



Student Ambassadors 
Each 

Thursday at 3:30 pm 
Student Union 320 



Chrissey, 

Say yes to the 
SPECIAL night! 



Lynn 




plan to just build the shell right 
now. We'll add on little by 
little," said Byron Carpenter, 
president. "We'll do the 
biggest part now, however. 
Then each new class will put a 
part of themselves into the 
house." 

Monday's ceremonies will 
be accented by an open party 
at the site, which is located on 
Tarlton Drive behind the Sigma 
. Kappa sorority house. 

"We don't need a house- 
we want one. It'll give us a 
central place for meetings and 
exchanges," commented 
Carpenter. "We've found if 
you join a frat for the house, 
then you're in it for the wrong 
reason." 

In addition to the goal of the 
a new house; Sigma Tau 
Gamma's is shooting for the 



award of most improved 
chapter in the nation. 

Also, the fraternity has 
reactivated the Rose Court- 
girls who help and support Sig 
Tau. They are initiated in a 
special ceremony. 

Current Roses include Lola 
Boone, Melissa Hightower, 
Kathy Jenney, Karen Jones, 
Carla Roberts, and Amanda 
Smith. Janice Duggan is Sig 
Tau's White Rose for this year. 
The number of girls on the 
court is based on the mem- 
bership figures of the chapter. 

Sigma Tau Gamma's new 
housing plans has met with 
approval from other Nor- 
thwestern greeks. 

"I think the fact that they're 
building a house is great," said 
Ben Mayeaux, vice-president 
of Kappa Sigma. "A strong 



fraternity is beneficial to the 
entire Greek system. It's 
through competition that each 
chapter work harder." 

"Sig Tau deserves a house. 
They are such nice guys," 
commented Doogie McNulty, 
a member of Phi Mu. 

Brenda Foster, a Sigma 
Kappa member, said "it's a 
good idea. It's about time they 
have a house again." 

TKE member Dennis Jef- 
fries agreed. "I like the idea; 
it's only fair," he said. 

Sigma Tau Gamma's fall 
pledges are Jerry Ackerman, 
Eddie Alamilla, Joe Cook, 
Mike Deramee, James Elder, 
Chuck Galleion, Benjamin 
Gillis, Paul Jones, Doug 
McBride, Charlie Moore, 
Eugene Pridgon, Scott Sibille, 
and Jeff Thompson. 



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CURRENT SAUCE 
Sept. 25,1984 
Vol. 73, No. 6 



tiecTion nesuiTS 
Election Results 



[ZlQ^N-fi/^r^ D 



Homecoming Court 




David Decuir 
Sophomore Senator 



Donna Lewis 



Bryan K. Williams 



Charlotte Zumwalt 




Commissioner 

of Elections 



Jerome Cox 
Junior Senator 



Johnny Cox 



Jeff Eversull 



Sylvester Roque 





Dane Broussard 



RUNOFF 
ELECTIONS 

NEXT 
WEDNESDAY 



Tommy Moore 



Frank Morris 



Greg Shoalmire 



Paula Simmons 



I 



r 




uampus uireciory 
Campus Directory 



CURRENT SAUCE 
Sept. 25,1984 
Vol. 73, No. 6 



T 

7 



Current Sauce Campus Directory 



Accounting 5161 

Admissions 4503 

Agriculture 5912 

ALOC 4571 

Art 4544 

Aviation Science 5102 

Basketball 5891 

Biological Sciences 5323 

Bookstore 4473 

Beauty Shop 5451 

' Business Administration 51 61 

Cafeteria, Union 5784 

Carpenter Shop 51 51 

Cent, for Hist/La. Educ. 4396 

Central Receiving 5152 

Chemistry and Physics 5501 

College of Arts/Sciences 5808 

College of Basic Studies 441 3 

College of Business 5161 

College of Education 61 87 

College of Graduate Stud. 5851 

College of Nursing 6776 

Comptroller 5446 

Computer Center 5594 

Continuing Education 4579 

Counseling Center 5901 

Current Sauce 5456 

Dance 6894 

Dean of Students 5286 

Delta Zeta Sorority 2-31 27 

Enrollment Management 5240 

External Affairs 4414 



Business Bldg. 106 
East Caspari Hall 116 
Williamson Hall 105 
Caddo Hall Center 
A.A. Fredericks 208 
Kyser Hall 3rd floor 

Prather Coliseum 
Bienvenu (Biology Bldg.) , 
Union 
Union 

Business Bldg. 106 

Union 

TEC 115 

Fournet Hall 116 
Kyser Hall 153 
Old Trade School 102 
Business Bldg. 106 
TEC 104 
Roy Hall 109 
Shreveport, LA 
Roy Hall 206 
Roy Hall 

East Caspari Hall 102 
Kyser Hall 104 
Kyser Hall 225A 

A.A. Fredericks 1 06 
Union 309 
Greek Hill 

East Caspari Hall 215 
A.A. Fredericks 129 



Phone: 352-2573 
foe J 

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130 Hwy. 1 South 
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Football 

Gas Station 
Games Room-Union 

Health and PE 
History 

Home Economics 
Housing 

IET 

Infirmary 
Infornuition 
Informational Services 
Iberville Dining Hall 
Intramurals 

Kappa Alpha Fraternity 
Kappa Sigma Fraternity 

Language Arts 
Library 

Lost and Found 
Louisiana Hall 

Mathematics 

Meat Processing Facility 

Microbiology and Biochemistry 

Motor Pool 

Music 

Natchitoches Hall 
NSU Elementary Lab 
NSU Middle Lab 
NSU Press 

Personnel 
Phi Mu Sorority 
Placement Office 
Post Office 
Physical Plant 
Potpourri 
President's Home 
President's Office 
Psychology 
Purchasing 



5251 

5511 
5101 

5126 
6195 
5587 
6701 

4465 
5351 
6361 
6466 
4540 
5461 

2-9411 
2-9407 

6272 
4403 
5959 
5815 

5131 
4133 
5323 
5511 
4522 

5664 
5291 
4509 
4586 

4555 
2-4876 
5621 
5696 
5581 
5026 
6611 
5701 
5694 
5716 



Field House 319 

Gas Station 
Union 

PEM Budg. 
Kyser 239 

Home Economics 105 
Union 306 

Russell Hall 210 
Infirmary Bldg. 

Prather Coliseum 

Intramural Bldg. 

322 Second Street 
1 20 Second Street 

Kyser Hall 318 
Watson Library 
Union 



Kyser Hall 431 

Bienvenu Hall 11 2C 

Gas Station 

A.A. Fredericks 110 



Warren Easton Hall 
TEC 

Kyser Hall 237 

Roy Hall 209 
Greek Hill 
Union 305 
Post Office 
Roy Hall 210 
Kyser Hall 227 

Roy Hall 101 
Bienvenu Hall 
Roy Hall 217 



Radio Station - KNWD 


4422 


Russell Hall 


Rapides Hall 


6101 




Recreation Complex 


2-6133 


Recreation Complex 


Registrar 


6171 


Roy Hall 108 


ROTC 


5156 


Noe Hall 110 


Sabine Hall 


6216,5188 




Sigma Kappa Sorority 


7-01 78 


Greek Hill 


Sigma Sigma Sigma Soror. 


2-8765 


Greek Hill 


Social Sciences 


6195 


Kyser Hall 239 


Student Activities 


6511 


Union 214 


Student Financial Aid 


5961 


Roy Hall basement 


Student Services 


6703 


Union 306 


Student Union 


6511 


Union 214 


TKE Fraternity 


2-9470 


Greek Hill 


Tennis 


5126 


PEM Bldg. 


Theatre and Speech 


6196 


A.A. Fredericks 106 


Theta Chi Fraternity 


7-9250 


Greek Hill 


University Printing 


5297 


IET Bldg. 


University Police 


5431 


Infirmary Bldg. 


Varnado Hail 


6407 




Vice President/Fiscal Aff . 


5325 


Roy Hall 200 


VP/Academic Affairs 


5361 


Roy Hall 104 


VP/Univ. Affairs 


5134 


Roy Hall 103 



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rsports 
Sports 



CURRENT SAUCE 
Sept. 25, 1984 
Vol. 73, No. 6 



9 



Demons look 'Dynamite' in taming of Wildcats 



Demons 'TNT Abilene Christian , 26-7 



Northwestern's football 
team took the "Demon 
Dynamite" promotion to heart 
Saturday night and used some 
explosions of their own in a 
26-7 triumph over Abilene 
Christian in Turpin Stadium. 

The Demons rolled up 427 
yards in total offense, while 
the Gulf Star Conference- 
leading defense stopped ACU 
and its heralded quarterback 
Loyal Proffitt with just 149 
yards. 

Quarterback Rob Fabrizio 
started for the injured Wayne 
Van, and early in the second 
quarter put the Demons on the 
scoreboard with a fourth-and- 
goal dive from the one. A two- 
point attempt was no good, 
andNSU led, 6-0. 

Several plays later, Nor- 
thwestern found itself with 
another fourth-and-goal from 
the one yard line. Coach Sam 
Goodwin gambled once again, 
and again the Demons came 
through. A short scamper by 
John Stephens, plus the extra 
point kick, put Northwestern 
on top, 13-0. 

Abilene Christian pulled to 
within six at the half when 
Proffitt hit Arthur Culpepper 
with a nine-yard touchdown 
strike. The kick was good, 
cutting the Demon lead to 13- 
7. 



The second half, however, 
was all Northwestern. 

In the third quarter, Fabrizio 
hit David Groman for a nine- 
yard touchdown. The kick 
was no good, and the Demon 
lead was stretched to 1 9-7. 

With four minutes left in the 
third, Roy Fontenot's 44-yard 
punt return set up yet another 
Northwestern touchdown by 
Fabrizio. The Demon quar- 
terback's 1 1 -yard jaunt into 
the end zone, combined with 
the extra point, gave NSU a 
commanding 26-7 lead. 

Neither team scored, or 
seriously threatened, in the 
fourth quarter. 

Eliot Dawson ended the 



night with a game-high 1 1 2 
yards in 15 carries. Chris 
Chenier carried 10 times for 
98 yards, while Stephens 
added 80 yards in 1 7 tries. 
Fabrizio scrambled for another 
72 yards. 

Northwestern raised its 
record to 1 -2 following three- 
point losses at McNeese and 
Angelo State. Abilene fell to 
1-2, following a season- 
opening loss at Montana and a 
win over Northern Colorado in 
Abilene 

NSU tackles rival Northeast 
Louisiana in Monroe's Malone 
Stadium on Saturday. 



Womens' Cross Country 
Begins Inaugural Season 



Saturday, Sept. 1 5, marked 
the beginning of what 
promises to be a long and 
successful association of 
women's cross country and 
Northwestern. 

The newly-formed Lady 
Demon cross country club 
traveled to Shreveport to 
participate in the 3rd Annual 
Super Derby Run. The ladies' 



Scoreboard 



LSU 27, Arizona 26 

The 2-0-1 Tigers came from behind to beat the Wildcats in 
Tiger Stadium. 

Nicholls31, Austin Peay 6 

The Colonels ripped the previously unbeaten AP team to 
record their first win. 

Texas-Arlington 48, Southwest Texas 14 

UTA had no problem handing the Gulf Star-favorite Bobcats 
'heir first loss this season. 

Mississippi 14, LA Tech 8 

Tech fell to 1 -3 after the heartbreaking loss to the Rebels in 
Oxford. 



Stephen F. Austin 17, Texas A&l 

A&| lost another one, 
Na cogdoches. 



this time to the 3-1 Lumberjacks in 



Alabama 37, Southwestern LA 14 

The win-hungry Crimson Tide clobbered the 1-3 Cajuns in 
'uscaloosa. 

Auburn 35, Southern Mississippi 12 

At Auburn, the Top 20-ranked Tigers had little trouble with 
Mure NSU opponent USM. 

Kentucky 30, Tulane 26 

The 3-0 'Cats were thinking too much about Bourbon Street, 
n <l almost lost to the winless Green Wave. 



event was a two-mile race 
through open . field and 
wooded trails, selected by 
officials to challenge even the 
strongest athletes. 

At the end of the event, 
Northeast reigned supreme in 
both the men and women's 
division; however, the Lady 
Demons made it known that 
they would have to be con- 
tended with in the future. 
Leading the way for NSU was 
Lori Frances finishing 11th, 
followed by Lisa Breazeale 
13th, Margaret Gies 7 4th, 
Chris Ford 1 5th, and Maria 
Gies 16th. 

Coaches fc the ladies club 
felt there were areas that 
could be improved and 
suggested there would be 
greater things to come. The 
season for this year's club 
included some eight cross 
country events with the ladies 
traveling to Stephen F. Austin, 
Tech, LSU, and Gulfport, MS. 

The next meet will be the 
Demon Stampede at NSU on 
Sept. 29. 





Six more- 
Demon runner John Stephens goes over the top for one of 
Northwestern's four touchdowns in Saturday's 26-7 
thrashing of Abilene Christian University. Stephens is a 
freshmen running back from Springhill. 



Give 
Blood. 




It's, A 
Heartwarming 
Experience. 

Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 
Student Union Ballroom 



Northwestern (1 -2) at Northeast LA (3-0) 



Mascot: Demons 
Enrollment: 6,100 
Colors: Purple, white, and orange 
Location: Natchitoches, LA 
Founded: 1884 
Conference: Gulf Star 
Affiliation: NCAA Div. I-AA 
1983 record: 4-7 




Mascot: Indians 
Enrollment: 12,500 
Colors: Maroon and Gold 
Location. Monroe, LA 
Founded: 1931 
Conference: Southland 
Affiliation: NCAA Div. I-AA 
1983 Record: 8-3 



I 

Ni 

s< 

The 
was fo 
as an * 
studer 
Univer: 
promol 
school: 
' in surrc 
Thes 
prospe 
ailing, 
etters. 

r 




Says Goodwin: 



Winning Felt Good 



it was a different feeling for 
Coach Sam Goodwin as the 
final minutes ticked away 
Saturday night in Turpin 
Stadium, but it was a feeling 
he enjoyed as the Demons 
defeated Abilene Christian by 
a 26-7 margin to for the first 
NSU win in three games this 
season. 

The different feeling came in 
the margin of the victory as the 
contest marked the first time in 
his 1 4 games at Northwestern 
that Goodwin could feel safe in 
the final minutes of play. "It 
was nice to able to relax at the 
end," he said. 

The Demon defense turned 
in another outstanding per- 
formance Saturday, while the 
offense rushed for more 



yardage than any Demon tearrt 
had done since a 21-14 win 
over Nicholls State in 1 980. 

Abilene could muster only 
1 49 total yards against tha 
NSU defense, ranked 1 1th m 
the nation. 

"Our defense really got after 
them," noted Goodwin. "We^ 
were able to put mord 
pressure on the quarterback in 
the second half. Tank Berry 
got a sack early in the third 
period and from the on we did 
better with the rush." 

The Demon kick return 
game also had its best night of 
the season. Odessa Turner! 
returned two kickoffs for 62 
yards and Roy Fontenot had 
1 22 yards on seven punl 
returns. 



Picking up a couple... 

ACU runner Arthur Culpepper dives for a first down in 
Saturday's NSU win. Demon corner back Robert Moore 
makes the stop. 

With the win, NSU ran its record to 1-2 after two three-point 
losses, while the Wildcats fell to 1 -2. 

Demons Tackle 
Ranked Bndians 



Saturday's football game 
with unbeaten Northeast will 
put the Demons against an 
Indian squad currently ranked 
fourth in the nation. 

Both the NCAA and 
Lexington Herald polls show 
NLU ranked fourth, while the 
Indians are sixth in the 
Football News poll. 

Northeast will be the second 
ranked team the Demons have 
faced thus far. McNeese is 
currently ranked second in the 
nation after a 4-0 start, in- 
cluding a season-opening 17- 
1 4 win over the Demons in 
Lake Charles. 

While the Demons were 
defeating the Abilene Christian 
Wildcats, the Indians had an 
open date. NLU is recovering 
from a tough 7-6 win over USL 
in Lafayette two weeks ago, 
and used the extra week to 
prepare for the NSU game. 



Northeast downed Nicholls 
State in Thibodaux, 13-9, to 
open the season. Three 
weeks ago the Indians blitzed 
Central Florida, 49-21, at 
Monroe. 

NSU holds at 22-10 series 
advantage over Northeast, but 
the home team has won each 
of the last seven encounters, 
including Northwestern's 1 3-9 
upset of the nationally-ranked 
Indians in Turpin Stadium. 

Turpin opened in 1 976, and 
NLU's Malone Stadium 
opened two years later. Since 
Turpin's dedication, the visiting 
team has left empty-handed. 
The Indians are 0-4 in Nat- 
chitoches, while the Demons 
are 0-3 at Malone. 

Northwestern goes into the 
NLU game a 10-point un- 
derdog, according to the 
nationally-respected Bob 
Harmon Forecast. 




DRESS SHOP 

DIXIE PLAZA 352-1436 



Updated Fashions 
For Juniors 



And Missys 



.CVS' 



Watch For Grand Opening 
Sept. 27, 28, 29 

Register to win a Norwegian 
Blue Fox Fur. Drawing September 
29, 1984. 

Open 9 a.m. -6 p.m. 




Fast Company 



-fjevvs 
News 

t jVlQ\A/Q 



CURRENT SAUCE 
Sept. 25,1984 
Vol. 73, No. 6 



TTi 

11 

_±JJ 



Student Ambassadors Begin Year's Activities 



The Student Ambassadors 
ivas formed last year to serve 
is an organization of full-time 
itudents who serve as 
jniversity representatives and 
hromote Northwestern at 
schools across Louisiana and 
in surrounding states. 
; These ambassadors contact 
prospective students by 
palling, visiting, or writina 
tetters. They also travel with 



the enrollment management 
staff. The main qualification to 
become a student am- 
bassador is a love of NSU and 
a desire to help the university 
grow. 

"It doesn't take much time to 
talk to prospective students 
and it's fun. You can make 
alot of new friends and talk to 
old friends that you went to 
high school with." commented 



Cammy McClary, treasurer 

The 'Big Student Search 
Campaign' has already started 
with the hiring of three new 
enrollment management 
counselors: Tony Hernandez, 
Nathaniel Meadors, and 
Melody Busby. 

Student Ambassadors' main 
goal for the future is to keep 
an active file of names, ad- 
dresses, phone numbers, and 




What does it take to get 
a good job these days? A good education is a 
necessity. Experience certainly helps. Intel- 
ligence. A willingness to learn. Ambition to 
get to the top. The ability to get along with 
people. And energy because without energy 
there just wouldn't be any jobs to fill. In order 
to supply that energy, electric companies must 
take advantage of the most up-to-date tech- 
nology, build facilities as efficient as possible 
and make full use of every available energy 
source including nuclear power and coal. 
Energy. You need it to get a job. 



LOUISIANA'S INVESTOR-OWNED 
ELECTRIC COMPANIES 

- INVESTING IN YOUR ENERGY FUTURE 



Central Louisiana Electric Company / Gulf States Utilities Company / Louisiana Power & Light Company 
New Orleans Public Service Inc. / Southwestern Electric Power Company 



classification of every student 
in the state, starting with 
freshman. 

Jodi Werfal, a new member, 
added, "We are really excited 
about this year; we had a 
former student tell us that she 
is starting a student am- 
bassadors organization at the 



University of Houston and it is 
being patterned after us. 
That's a real honor." 

If anyone has information on 
any high school student or is 
interested in becoming a 
student ambassador, please 
contact Sherri Waggoner in 
Caspari Hall 215 



Organizational Pictures 
To Be Taken Next Week 



Organizational pictures will 
be taken in the Union ballroom 
on Oct. 8-10 from 6:30-9 
p.m., according to Jan 
Chatelain, organizations 
editor. 

Chatelain said that all 
membership rosters should be 
sent to her at the Potpourri 
office. She added that since 
the schedule is "very tight, all 
group members should be 
prompt." 

The schedule for Monday, 
October 8, is: 

Equine Science, 6:30; 
Agriculture Club, 6:40; 
PRSSA, 6:50; Sigma Delta 
Chi, 7:00; Sigma Alpha lota, 
7:10; Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, 
7:20; Psi Chi, 7:30, and 
Psychology Club, 7:40. 

SNA, 7:50; SPA, 8:00; 
Micro- Biochem Club, 8:10; 
Rad. Tech, 8:20; University of 
Yang, 8:30; Young 
Democrats, 8:40; and Beta 
Beta Beta, 8:50. 

Tuesday's schedule calls 
for: 



Beta Gamma Psi, 6:30; Le 
Cercle Francais, 6:40; IEEE. 
6:50; NAIT, 7:00; Purple 
Jackets, 7:10; Blue Key, 
7:20; and Alpha Eta Rho, 
7:30. 

Also, Phi Alpha Theta, 7:40 
Delta Psi Kappa, 7:50 
NACUS, 8:00; SLAE, 8:10 
Student Ambassadors, 8:20 
FWCC, 8:30; Geological 
Society, 8:40; and DPMA, 
8:50. 

On Wednesday the 
following group pictures will 

SAM, 6:30; Black Knights, 
6:40; Orienteering, 6:50; Phi 
Kappa Phi, 7:00; Phi Eta 
Sigma, 7:10; FCS, 7:20; 
FCA, 7:30; Chi Alpha, 7:40; 
NCAS, 7:50; and Home Ec. 
Club, 8:00. 

Wesley Foundation, 8:10; 
BSU, 8:20; Alpha Lambda 
Delta, 8:30; Kappa Omicron 
Phi, 8:35; Alpha Mu Gamma, 
8:40; lota Lambda Sigma, 
8:45; and NSU Images, 8:50. 



NSU Archives Exhibit 
Expanded, on Display 



Northwestern's Centennial 
archives exhibit, "Souvenirs of 
a Century," has been ex- 
panded and now includes a 
wide range of interesting 
displays on all three floors of 
Watson Library. 

The nostalgic exhibit of 
memorabilia from NSU's 100- 
year history opened May 31 in 
the library's third floor Cammie 
G. Henry Research Center as 
one of the highlights of the 
"Celebration of a Century." 

"There is a wealth of 
historical material pertaining to 
Northwestern's history and 
the people who have helped 
her through 100 years of 
development," said Mildred 
Lee Gandy, a member of the 
archives staff who coor- 
dinated the "Souvenirs of a 
Century" exhibit. 

Some of the material that 



could not be displayed in the 
Henry Center now may be 
viewed in first-floor 
showcases developed by the 
library's references and 
circulation staffs and in 
second-floor displays 
prepared by media and serials 
staff members. 

An edition of the Potpourri 
yearbook from each of the 
past 10 decades of Nor- 
thwerstern's history is in- 
cluded in the first-floor 
showcases, while on the 
second floor are historical 
reflections of the past as seen 
through a scrapbook of old 
photographs. 

Individuals visiting the 
"Souvenirs of a Century" 
exhibit will have the op- 
portunity to purchase 
cassettes duplicated by the 
media staff 



I 



TZ 

In CURRENT SAUCE 
Sept. 25, 1984 

±2. 



Vol. 73, No. 6 



viewpoint 

Viewpoint 

\/io \A/r>r>int 



'Dynamite' 
Is Just That 

Word number three from the Demon dictionary: 
Demon Dynamite - a promotion designed to keep 
students on campus during home football 
weekends and to hype Demon athletics. 

And unlike many past such attempts, this 
promotion started out with a bang. 

Union Station was packed (synonymous with 
crowded, jammed, etc.) for Friday afternoon's 
"Attitude Adjustment." The event was filled with 
food, drinks, fun, and something rare for NSU-- 
people. 

A pep rally followed in the Union lobby with the 
band, cheerleaders, and football players. And 
despite the weather, it was a good pep rally, full of 
school spirit-something NSU needs more of. 

Friday night's dance and other activities were also 
well attended, and everyone had a good time. 

The key to the entire weekend-TNT (tailgatin' 'n 
Turpin)--was threatened by gray clouds all morning. 
The skies cleared, however, by 1 p.m. so the 
tailgating could proceed. Only the intramural 
competition had to be cancelled. 

Several hundred people were on hand for the 
outdoor party-which was complete with food, drinks, 
the NSU band, cheerleaders, Entertainers, and the 
rock band Southpaw. 

The Demon football team capped off a great 
weekend with a 26-7 clobbering of Abilene Christian 
in Turpin Stadium. 

Another party is scheduled down the street from 
Malone Stadium in Monroe this weekend. Then 
comes Demon Dynamite weekend number two on 
October 5-6, when the University celebrates its 
1 00th birthday and the Demons meet Southwest 
Texas State, the Gulf Star pre-season favorites. 

The key to making these events (and Northwestern 
as a whole) successful is participation. When a lot of 
people turn out for an event, everyone has a good 
time. The opposite is also true. 

Come support the Demons in Monroe this 
weekend, and again next weekend for Homecoming. 
Who knows? You might just surprise yourself and 
have a good time. 



John Ramsey 



Editor 




S--50 



1984 Universal Press Syndicate 




ENTERING 
TQWNVILLE 

A GENERIC 
I COMMUNITY 




Letter to the Editor 

Dear Editor: 

The University Debate Program would like to issue an in- 
vitation to all interested students to attend an introductory 
meeting on Thursday at 12:30 p.m., in Fine Arts 127, to 
acquaint you with the opportunities you would be able to enjoy 
and benefit from by participating in the debate program. In the 
debate program, you may take part in as many activities as you 
desire. You may participate with a partner and travel to debate 
tournaments throughout the United States; or, if you prefer, you 
may help with the direction of speech tournaments which we 
sponsor at our universtiy. In either case, you will be able to 
acquire many of the communication skills which will be an asset 
to you in your education and in your profession. 

College graduates have often indicated that they wished they 
had acquired more communication skills during their college 
training. Intercollegiate debate can be an excellent training 
ground in which to develop these skills. 

Naturally, there are more advantages to debate, although 
these are the most important advantages. You would also enjoy 
the travel experiences visiting other university campuses, and 
the opportunities to associate socially with other students in- 
terested in the same communication objectives as yourself. 

At the meeting on Thursday, I will tell you more about the 
debate progam and acquaint you with the national debate topic 
for this year. If you are not able to attend this meeting, you may 
find me in my office any day, Room 107, Fine Arts Building. I 
hope to see you soon at the meeting or in my office. 

Dr. DeAnn McCorkle 



Advisor Speaks to Student Body 



With great anticipation, I eagerly take this fisrt opportunity to 
communicate with the NSU community through this open forum 
the Current Sauce. 

The Current Sauce is a collective body. As a group we want to 
enliven the NSU campus with factual, informative, personable, 
appealing insights. We will strive to make the printed words 
accurate and timely. We will work to analyze and report the 
conflicts, concerns, and well-being of our community. 

You are the ombudsman of our activities. Our prosperous 
growth is dependent on the feedback that we receive from 
readers. As an adviser, I will certainly provide constant con- 
structive criticism. However, the student-run, student-financed 
Current Sauce yearns for student viewpoints in determining and 
setting obtainable objectives. We want your constructive 



criticism. 

From my viewpoint, it is enticing to see Current Sauce staff 
members scurrying to catch up on neglected responsibilities, or 
getting a jump ahead on upcoming duties. I am pleased to see 
the activity and to provide positive prodding. 

As a teacher, the increased enrollment in the freshman class 
provides a great resource for me to work with in the coming 
years to meld the journalism curriculum into providing a potential 
resource pool of personnel to actively and knowledgeably work 
with in production student publications. It is important to me that 
we, the staff of the Current Sauce, do all that we can to let you 
know we want your support and we will work to keep our 
publication improving in a direction that coincides with the best 
interests of the student body. Peter Minder 



Current 
Sauce 
Staff 

USPS 140-660 



John Ramsey 
Editor 

Lisa Williams 
Managing Editor 

Stacy Scroggins 
Business Manager 

Lucy LeBlanc 
Darlene Winslow 
Advertising 

Kim Nolde 
Sports Editor 

Robin J. Gunter 
News Editor 

Bubba Soileau 
Entertainment 

Scott Cox 
Bryan Williams 
Gena Williams 

News Staff 

Russel Bienvenu 
Circulation Manager 

Kevin Hopkins 
Don Pearce 
Darlene Winslow 
Shawn Wyble 
Photographers 

Peter Minder 
Adviser 

Current Sauce is 
published weekly by 
students of Northwestern 
State University of 
Louisiana. It is student- 
run and financed, and is 
not associated with any of 
the University's colleges 
or t. oartments. Staff 
members are selected by 
the Editor, with the ap- 
proval of the Student 
Media Board. 

Editorial and business 
offices are located at 
225A Kyser Hall. Office 
hours are 1-4 p.rn- 
Tuesday through Friday- 
The telephone number i* 
(318)357-5456. 

All correspondence 
should be brought by the 
office or mailed to BoX 
5306, NSU. Natchitoches. 
LA 71497. Deadline foT 
both advertising and copy 
is 1 p.m. on the Thursday 
preceding Tuesday 
publication. J 



October 2, 1984 1 
Vol. 73, No. 7 



NEWS 
BRIEFS 



RIVERCITY TO TAKE 
OLD-FASHIONED 
PHOTOS 

Rivercity Photographers, 
sponsored by the SAB, will 
be in the Union Ballroom 
Tuesday from 1 1 a.m. until 
3 p.m. Any full-time student 
presenting his current ID 
may have his old-fashioned 
photograph taken for $1 . 

PRSSA SCHEDULES 
FIRST MEETING 

The NSU chapter of the 
Public Relations Student 
Society of America (PR- 
SSA) will be holding a 
meeting Thursday, in Kyser 
213 at 3 p.m. All com- 
munication majors are 
welcome. 

UNION STATION 
DEDICATED 

The grand opening and 
formal dedication of Union 
was held on Monday. 

Special entertainment for 
Union Station's grand 
opening and ribbon-cutting 
ceremonies included Chip 
Franklin, an award-winning 
songwriter who ri<*s" per- 
formed with such acts as 
Jackson Browne and Dan 
Fogelberg. 

NOON ALTERNATIVE 
FEATURES NUTRITION 

This weeks Thursday 
Noon Alternative will 
feature Mrs. Migna 
Weatherington from the 
Country Pantry sharing the 
importance of nutrition. 
Help is also needed to work 
on an outstanding Float 
entry for the parade. Call or 
come by the Wesley (352- 
2888). Movie night is 
Thursday at 7 p.m. 

SEVENTEEN COMPLETE 
R.O.T.C. CAMP 

Seventeen ROTC cadets 
n f v e successfully com- 
peted the U.S. Army's 
^enior ROTC Advanced 
^mmer Camp at Fort 
Riley, ks. 

Completing the six-week 
'raining program were Pat 
wudreaux, Corris Boyd, 
William K. Doane, Kenneth 
|, 0r d, Mark Freshley, Cecil 
jersey, Patrick Quenga, 
"eginaid L. Horton, Joseph 
Keating, William Keller, 
" an| el Kratz, Lemuel 
^arshall Jr., John O'Shee, 
ue nnis Pitt, Eric D. 



Swe 



Thomas 
'riplett. 



eney, 



George E. 
and Robert B. 



Link letter To Speak At Convocation 



iTelevision and radio personality Art Linkletter. 
will be the guest speaker for the Centennial 
Convocation at 10 a.m. Friday in the A. A. 
Fredericks Center auditorium. 

A capacity crowd of over 1 ,300 people from 
throughout Louisiana and across the nation is 
expected. The convocation is open to the 
public, and is one of the numerous events 
scheduled this week in celebration of the 
University's centennial. 

Linkletter has been in radio and television for 
over 45 years, and performed in two of the 
longest-running shows in broadcasting history, 
House Party, which aired for 25 years, and 
People Are Funny, which was a ratings favorite 
for 1 9 years. 

He also authored "Kids Say the Darndest 



Things," a book which led the non-fiction list in 
sales for two years and is currently 1 4th on tbe 
list of all non-fiction books published in the 
United States. 

Homecoming will be observed Saturday, 1 00 
years to the day of Northwestern's official 
chartering in 1 884 by the legislature. 

In addition to the keynote address by 
Linkletter, the Convocation will feature remarks 
by officials from the University, the city of 
Natchitoches, the Alumni Association, and 
Louisiana's Board of Regents and Board of 
Trustees. Both boards will meet while at NSU. 

The dedication of the Centennial Plaque will 
be done by Dr. Arnold Kilpatrick, president 
emeritus. Cathy Ernst, a freshman at Nor- 
thwestern, will provide "A Look Forward." 




Art Linkletter 



Current Sauce 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 

NATCHITOCHES, LA 



Celebration Of A Century, 1884-1984 




Arthur To Reign 
Over Homecoming 



Susan Arthur 
1984 Homecoming Queen 



Susan Arthur, will reign this 
weekend as queen of NSU's 
Centennial celebration and 
100th anniversary 
Homecoming. 

As the Centennial 
Homecoming Queen, Arthur 
will be spotlighted Saturday, 
Oct. 6, during the 
Homecoming Parade at 10 
a.m. in Natchitoches and 
through the campus, at the 
Centennial Luncheon at 
1 1 :45 a.m. in the Union 
Ballroom, at half time of the 
football game between 
Northwestern and Southwest 
Texas at 2 p.m. in Turpin 
Stadium and at the Centennial 



Elections Set For Wednesday 



Elections will be held again Wednesday, with 
four class senator seats, nine positions on the 
State Fair Court, and Mr. and Miss NSU up for 
grabs. 

Originally, all four classes were scheduled to 
have runoffs, but an error in calculation of a 
majority was made by the SGA Election Board. 
Instead of runoffs in the sophomore and senior 
classes, two candidates in each class were 
elected. 

Johnny Cox and Jeff Eversull will serve as 
sophomore senators, while Brunetta Anthony 
and Donna Jo Kelly were elected by the 
seniors. 

In the freshman race, four candidates are 
fighting for the two open seats. Dave Decuir, 
Donna Lewis, Bryan Williams, and Charlotte 
Zumwat are the candidates. 

Four juniors are also in the running for class 
senator. They are Tommy Moore, Frank 
Morris, Greg Shoalmire, and Paula Simmons. 

Students will be able to vote for nine can- 



didates for the State Fair Court, which will be 
presented at the State Fair Classic vs. 
Louisiana Tech in two weeks. 

Nominated for the court are Brunetta An- 
thony, Stacy BaumgardneY, Rita Davis, Christi 
Dickey, LaJoyce Gaulden, Kecia Guillory, 
Marsha Kay McLamore, Heidi Myles, Kim 
Nolde, Stephanie Norred, Carla Roberts, 
Michaela Sampite, Sharon Sampite, Amy 
Spicer, Lea Vining, Lisa Williams, and Su Su 
Williamson. 

Mr. NSU candidates, nominated by various 
groups, organizations, and residence halls, are 
Russel Bienvenu, Ron Cook, Timothy Jacobs, 
Mike Miguez, Jon Robbins, and John Sacker. 

Miss NSU nominees are Darlene Brown, 
Janice Duggan, Cindy Ernst, Brenda Foster^ 
Eileen Haynes, Carla Roberts, Sharon Sampite, 
and Laurie Weaver. 

Elections will be held Wednesday from 
a.m. to 7 p.m., according to Dane Broussard 
commissioner of elections. 



8 



at 9 p.m. in Prather Coliseum. 

Arthur is the daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Raymond Arthur. Her 
father is the outgoing 
president of the NSU Alumni 
Association, a position he has 
held for six years. 

At Northwestern, Arthur is 
secretary of Sigma Sigma 
Sigma Sorority, a third-year 

'Celebration of a 

Century' 
see pages 7-10 

member of the NSU En- 
tertainers top 40 music group, 
in her second year as a Kappa 
Sigma Fraternity "Starduster" 
and is a batgirl for the Demon 
baseball team. 

The Centennial 
Homecoming Queen, who is 
attending the University on a 
full academic scholarship, was 
State Fair Queen in 1 983 and 
a member of that court in 
1982. 

Arthur's other activities ^. 
Northwestern include 
memberships in Alpha Lambda 
Delta, Sigma Delta Chi, PR- 
SSA and the SGA's Student 
Supreme Court. 

Eight coeds also were 
elected to serve as members 
of the Centennial 
Homecoming Court. They are 
Susan Combest, Cindy Er- 
nest, Theresa Guillory, Eileen 
Haynes, Melissa Hightower, 
Yevette Jordan, Carmel 
Preyan, and Amy Whitford. 



~z 

2 CURRENT SAUCE 
Oct. 2, 1984 



NGWS 

News 

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Vol. 73, No. 7 




Ronnie's sidekick 

T.H. Bell, secretary of education for President Ronald 
Reagan, will be the keynote speaker for Saturday's Cen- 
tennial Luncheon in the Union Ballroom. 



Students aware of 
many kinds of dance 



More and more people ai 
becoming aware of all types ot 
dance through Fine Arts 104, 
Aerobics, and Jazz. 

There are over 300 people 
enrolled in Aerobics this 
semester. Along with Mrs. 
Vicki Parrish's sections, Lisa 
Breazeale and Paula Webb 
help to satisfy the demand. 

"Aerobics is not considered 
dance, but it gets students 
interested in the dance 
classes we offer," said Mrs. 
Parrish. 

Mrs Parrish also teaches 
over 60 students in her jazz 
and danceline classes. 

Mrs. Colleen Lancaster 
takes over with tap, country 
and western, ballroom, and 
other types of dance. 

Karen and Craig Nazor 
teach Ballet and Modern 
dance which are less popular, 
but in their eyes more im- 
portant. 

"Ballet and particularly 
modern style to the dance 
world is like classical style to 
the music world. Jazz is more 
popular like rock music," 
commented Craig Nazor. 

Their students learn 
choreography, rhythmic 



Keynote Speaker 

U.S. Secretary of Education to speak at luncheon 



T.H. Bell, U.S. Secretary of 
Education, will be the keynote 
speaker for the Centennial 
Luncheon on Saturday. 

The luncheon, which is one 
of the highlights of NSU's 
100th anniversary 
Homecoming, is scheduled for 
1 1 :45 a.m. in the Union 
Ballroom. 

Tickets for the Centennial 
Luncheon are $7 for adults 
and $3 for children. They may 
be purchased in advance at 
the Office of External Affairs in 
the A.A. Fredericks Center or 
reserved by calling 357- 
4414. 

In addition to the keynote 
address by Bell, other 
highlights of the Centennial 
Luncheon will include the 
election and installation of 
officers and members of the 
Northwestern Alumni 
Association and NSU 
Foundation boards of 
directors, and the presen- 
tation of plaques to several 
individuals who have made 
outstanding contributions to 
the University's Centennial 
celebration since it formally 
began in January. 



Bell, who was sworn in as 
U.S. Secretary of Education at 
the White House in January of 
1981, has been recognized 
nationally for working diligently 
toward the goal of achieving 
excellence and quality in 
education for all Americans. 

For his efforts, Bell has been 
awarded 1 1 honorary doc- 
torates, three special citations 
from three different 
Secretaries of the Department 
of Health, Education and 
Welfare, the Distinguished 
Service Award from the 
Council of Chief State School 
Officers, and several other 
honors and awards. 

Bell earned his Bachelor of 
Arts degree from the 
University of Idaho in 1954 
and the Dectorate in 
Educational Administration 
from the University of Utah in 
1961. 

The U.S. Secretary in the 
current Reagan administration 
began his career in education 
as a teacher of chemistry, 
physics and athletics in Idaho 
in 1946. 

Bell's career includes 
serving as a school 



superintendent in Idaho, 
Wyoming and Utah, and also 
seven years as the Utah State 
Superintendent of Public 
Instruction. 

In 1970, he was appointed 
as the U.S. Office d 
Education's deputy com- 
missioner for school system, 
He also served for six month* 
as acting U.S. Commissioner 
of Education. 

Bell was appointed in 1 971 
as superintendent of the 
Granite School District in Salt: 
Lake City, the largest school] 
system in Utah, before] 
returning to Washington, in 
1974 to serve as U.S. 
Commissioner of Education. I 
Cabinet post of U.S. 
Secretary of Education after 
the presidential elections in 
1 980, he was serving as the; 
commissioner of higher' 
education and chief executive 
officer for the Utah State 
Board of Regents. 



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The Nazors feel that ballet 
and modern style is not yet 
understood in the United 
States, and dance as a serious 
art form is very new. 

"The first major U.S. dance 
company started around the 
late I920's or early 30 s, 
which is late compared with 
the European countries. A lot 
of education is needed here," 
said Karen Nazor. 

At the end of each semester 
the division of dance puts on a 
performance in the A.A. 
Fredricks Center. Also this 
semester the modern dance 
class will perform with the 
NSU Concert Choir. 

The dance division will soon 
offer both a B.A. and a 
masters in dance. 



Oops! We Goofed! 

In last week's Current Sauce 
campus directory, the College 
of Business and Applied 
Sciences' phone number and 
location were incorrectly 
listed. The correct phone 
number is 5606, while the 
office is located in Home 
Economics Bldg . 101. 

j .coy <»H o ■JO'Jtl&i V'li.l}£. 




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Styles And 
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fNews 

CURRENT SAUCE 

News 0ct 2 1984 



Vol. 73, No. 7 



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By Lisa Williams 

Managing Editor 

An "upsurge of educational 
importance" is the current 
trend in the world of education 
today, said popular television 
and radio star Art Linkletter in 
a telephone interview last 
Thursday. Linkletter, who has 
starred for 45 years in show 
business, will speak at the 
Centennial Convocation Friday 
at 10 a.m. in the A. A. 
Fredericks Auditorium. 

When asked what he 
thought it took for a university 
to be prosperous for 100 
years, Linkletter laughed, "A 
great endowment. In- 
terestingly enough, there are a 
number of colleges and 
universities that seem to be 
celebrating their centennial 
anniversaries. That indicates 
an upsurge of educational 
importance. Anybody that has 
been around that long must be 



doing something right." 

According to him, many of 
the problems in education 
today are caused by too many 
colleges and universities. 
"Over the next ten years," he 
predicted, "we will see the 
bigger (universities) getting 
bigger and the smaller having 
trouble." The smaller colleges 
and universities will have a 
tough ten years because of a 
downcurve in the number of 
college age people. "Then the 
curve will go up again." 

"Liberal arts programs are 
suffering. An A.D. in the 
History of Pharoh doesn't 
mean much today when you 
go looking for a job. I studied 
to be an English professor and 
minored in psychology. I am a 
long way from that today." 

"It is important for education 
to be required. It's like a 
gymnast who works on the 
parallel bars--he stills needs 



muscles, still needs to be in 
condition. College trains the 
mind." 

Most of his popularity came 
from television and radio; but 
Linkletter is displeased with 
television today. "Television is 
such a copycat medium, but 
we can't criticize T.V. for 
being what it is. It is an ad- 
vertising medium, not an 
educational medium. Its 
purpose is to reach people 
and sell toothpaste." 

"The worst thing is that 
television is a marvelous 
babysitter," he continued. 
"Parents set their children in 
front of the television for 6 1 /* 
hours per day of non- 
participatory, non-relationshio, 
non-imaginative babysitting. At 
least radio requires ycu to 
think. Parents abdicate their 
responsibility to their 
children." 

Linkletter has worked for the 



eta! 
at* 

jC. 

228. 

?fl 



jr ; 

Tender Ribeye teamed with 
golden fried shrimp, complete 
with cocktail sauce, baked potato, 
hot breads, and all you can eat from 
our fabulous Freshtastik's®Food Bar. 



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reg. 
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past 1 6 years in the c usade 
against drug abuse. 'I per- 
sonally feel the most effective 
teaching tool in the United 
States today is the Ute Beer 
commercials-they open door 
after door to alcohciism. Our 
children are beinc; educated 
that the only way to be happy 
is to be a little smashed." 

Dynamite 
Activities 
Scheduled 

Demon Dynamite activities 
for the homecoming week 
begin on Tuesday with a 
"Demon Dynamite Hunt" at 
the Student Body from 9:30- 
12:30. Clues will be given, 
and a prize of $200 is offered. 

On Tuesday, a Turpin 
Stadium "Blast" kicks off at 9 
p.m. with a disc jockey, beer, 
and music by the NSU En- 
tertainers. 

Friday begins with the 
second Attitude Adjustment in 
the Union Station at 4:30, 
followed by a pep rally at 6:00 
and a street dance in front of 
the Union at 7:00. 

The Centennial 
Homecoming parade kicks off 
at the Cola-Cola plant on 
Highway 1 at 10 a.m. 
Saturday. 

At 2:00, the Demon football 
team tackles highly-regarded 
Southwest Texas, the favorite 
for the GSC title. The Cen- 
tennial Ball in Prather Coliseum 
climaxes the weekend. 
Students will be admitted with 
ID, and dress is semiformal. 

Due to the afternoon starting 
time of the game, "TNT" will 
begin at 7 a.m. with a pancake 
cookoff at Prather. There will 
also be an NSU Birthday Cake 
contest. 

Faculty pictures 
set for Oct. 9-1 1 

Faculty pictures for the 
1 985 Potpourri will be taken 
by Don Sepulvado in Keyser 
Hall 113 on October 9-11 
from 9:30-12:30 or 1:30- 
4:00. 

"Faculty should make an 
extra effort to have their photo 
made this year, or to up-date 
your old photos," said Peter 
Minder, adviser. "We would 
love to have as close to 1 00 
percent participation as 
'possible in this , Centennial 

Faculty Section Of the year 

booK." 



Linkletter Expresses Views 



Greek 
Briefs 

Theta Chi 

Theta Chi had its semi- 
annual service project at 
the Lion's Crippled Children 
Camp in Leesville, on 
September 7-9. 

The after-the-ACU-game 
party, was a success 
thanks to Sigma Tau 
Gamma's combined effort, 
said Jon Mouser, 
secretary. 



Phi Mu 



Phi Mu sorority has 
pledged three more ladies, 
which brings the pledge 
class total to 27, according 
to Ro Fiorentino, public 
relations chairman. 

New pledges are Liz 
Barrero, Jerri Korenek, and 
Lisa Williams. 

Pledge class officers are 
Lisa Lawson, president; 
Cathy Ernst, vice- 
president; Shannon 
Bennet, secretary -treasu- 
rer; Mel Bice, Panhellenic 
representative; and Doogie 
McNulty, parliamentarian. 

Kappa Sigma 

Kappa Sigma's fall pledge 
class has chosen officers, 
according to Jimmy Chilton, 
pledge class president. 

Besides Chilton, other 
officers in the 2 1 -man 
pledge class include Dan 
Medlin, vice-president; 
Steve Horton, secretary; 
Greg Jolley, treasurer; and 
Nick Day and John Whiting, 
guards. 

Tri-Sigma 

Pledge officers for the fall 
have been elected: Patti 
Smiley, president; Chrissey 
Bailey, secretary; and Gena 
Kay Williams, panhellenic 
delegate. 

The house is now in the 
process of being 
remodeled. Carpet has 
arrived and will be installed 
this week. 

Kappa Alpha Order 
hosted an exchange on 
September 12. A large 
bouquet of roses were sent 
to the house the following 
day from the KA's. 

The teddy bear is the 
new Ideal symbol adopted 
^ by Tri-Sigma. 



CURRENT SAUCE 
Oct. 2,1984 
Vol. 73, No. 7 



New? 
News 




Mo 



\ A/ft 



if*- 



At 



You can call me Vic 

"Vic," short for Victory, has been selected as the name 
for the Demon mascot. Ray Carney, director of external 
affairs, won a trip for two to the State Fair Classic for sub- 
mitting the prize-winning name. 

KNWD Back On Air 
With New Antenna 



KNWD-FM is back on the air 
for the first time since placing 
both a new antenna and 
transmitter on top of Turpin 
Stadium earlier in the 
semester. 

This new system will in- 
crease KNWD's broadcast 
range. 

"We have become a 
community-minded radio 
station," said Randall Adock, 
general manager. "We play 
records for Natchitoches as 
well as NSU. In fact, the entire 
parish can pick us up now," he 
added. 

Adcock became general 
manager last spring, and is an 
electronics major. 

"We're constantly buying 
new equipment, and in a 
month or two we'll have a 
remote transmitter so we can 
do shows from all over the 
campus or anywhere within a 
five-mile radius," said Adcock. 

KNWD began in 1 974 as an 
AM station, and switched to 
FM in 1977. Currently, the 
station airs from noon to 
midnight with thirty disc 
jockeys, and a full-time 
executive staff. 



Each DJ has a three-hour 
show every week, and picks 
his own music, as long as it is 
within the station format. 

"I really like being a disc 
jockey," said Shawn Falgoust. 
"I can do my own thing and 
express myself," she said. 

KNWD's executive staff 
consists of Adcock; Paul Rino, 
program director; and Ferrell 
Sonnier, music director. 

Like most stations, KNWD 
broadcasts interviews, 
concerts, nationally syn- 
dicated shows, etc., but they 
also play many records that 
are just released and are not 
yet popular. 

According to Adcock, both 
major and independent record 
labels send records to college 
campuses. In return, a play list 
is sent to these companies. 
The more a record is played, 
the more future releases a 
station will get. 

KNWD is looking for disc 
jockeys, said Adcock. No 
previous experience is 
necessary, and all inquiries 
should be mailed to NSU Box 
3038 or made by telephone at 

057 36©3. 



Ray Carney chooses winning name 



'Vic' chosen as mascot's nam 



Demon Dynamite blasted off 
to a successful debut before 
the Abilene Christian game, 
according to Nan Holmes, 
manager of internal operations 
for the athletic department. 
The weekend's events which 
were capped off by an NSU 
victory, also included the 
naming of the Demon mascot. 

Ray Carney, director of 
external affairs, emerged from 
among 300 entrants to pin the 
name of "Vic," short for 
Victory, on the Demon. 
Carney wins a weekend for 
two at next months State Fair 
Classic. Holmes sand that the 
name "is positive and 
something that we can use for 
all sports. Most of the entrants 
were from area residents so 
the interest in Natchitoches is 



building." 

The interest certainly 
reached a peak on Saturday 
afternoon as approximately 
1 ,000 tailgators drank and 
danced to the sounds of the 
NSU Entertainers and the rock 
group Southpaw. Holmes was 
pleased with the turnout at all 
of the weekend's events. 
"Attendance at Friday night's 
attitude adjustment and- pep 
rally was excellent. The rain on 
Saturday morning wiped out 



our intramural events, but 
have to say that the oven 
response was tremendous 
said Holmes. 

Holmes looks for increase! 
attendance at the Denw 
Dynamite festivities H 
Homecoming weekend, whiq 
will get underway on Frm 
with a street dance in front: 
the Union and include anoth 
tailgate in Turpin par 
Saturday morning before I 
game. 



Celebration o/ a Century 

1884-1984 



U.S.News & World Report presents 

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I 



R EVERYONE 
ICS READY FOR A 






biections 

Elections 




Freshman 
Senator 



Pick two 



Dave Decuir 




I 




Irlebration of 
Century, 

84-1984 

mm 






I 



tiections 
Elections 



CURRENT SAUCE 
Oct. 2,1984 
Vol. 73, No. 7 



TTl 
11 



Miss NSU 



Darlene Brown 



Cindy Ernst 



Mr. NSU 




Janice Duggan 



Brenda Foster 



Russel Bienvenu 




Michael Miguez 



Junior 
Senator 




Greg Shoalmire 



Ron Cook 



fkww'* 1 1 
Jon Robbins 



Tommy Moore 



Paula Simmons 



Timothy Jacobs 




John Sacker 





Frank Morris 

Polls open 
from 
8 a.m.-7 p.m. 
Wednesday 

Union Lobby 

ID Required 



I 



TZ 

12 

122. 



CURRENT SAUCE 
Oct. 2, 1 984 
Vol. 73, No. 7 



News 
News 



Governor Edwards To 
Highlight Ceremonies 



Gov. Edwin Edwards will be 
in Natchitoches Thursday, to 
participate in the official 
opening ceremonies for 
Northwestern State 
University's Centennial 
weekend celebration and the 
formal dedication of Louisiana 
School. 

The opening ceremonies, to 
be highlighted by Edwards' 
unveiling of a commemorative 
Centennial plaque, and 
dedication program will begin 
at 4 p.m. in the east parking lot 
of the old Natchitoches High 
School, now the classroom, 
laboratory and administrative 
facilities for the Louisiana 
School. 

The master of ceremonies 
for the event will be Stan 
Powell, deputy director of 
Louisiana School and a 
member of the Alumni 
Association board of direc- 
tors. 

Other participants will be Dr. 
Joseph J. Orze, president; Dr. 
TP. Southerland, vice 
president of academic affairs; 
Dr. Robert Alost, director of 
Louisiana School; Rep. Jimmy 
Long, Sen. Don Kelly, Joe 
Sampite, mayor; Tod Klotz- 
bach, SGA president; and 
Lenny Richoux, Louisiana 
School student council 
president. 

The opening ceremonies for 
Northwestern's formal 
Centennial celebration will 
begin three days of numerous 



programs and activities 
focusing on 1 00th anniversary 
Homecoming scheduled for 
Saturday the actual date of the 
founding of the university in 
1884. 

Also scheduled Thursday is 
the "Stadium Blast" program 
at 6 p.m. in Turpin Stadium, an 
event featuring the top 40 
music of the NSU En- 
tertainers. 

Friday's Centennial 
Homecoming activities include 
a reunion of former and retired 
student affairs staff members, 
the Centennial Convocation, 
Alumni-Student Golf Tour- 
nament, 1 934 class reunion 
and the annual country dinner. 

Highlighting the Centennial 
Homecoming Day program on 
Saturday will be a parade at 
10 a.m., the NSU-Southwest 
Texas football game at 2 p.m. 
in Turpin Stadium and the 
Centennial Ball at 9 p.m. in 
Prather Coliseum. 




Student Ambassadors 



Thursday at 3:30 pm 



Country DJ 

The B. Hillman Bailey Broadcasting Scholarship for the fall 
semester has been awarded to Bubba Soileau (right), senior 
broadcasting major from Opelousas. From left are Ray 
Carney, director of external affairs and Bailey, Chairman of 
the board of the Natchitoches Broadcasting Company. 



Soileau 
Receives 
Award 

Bubba Soileau has been 
awarded the $300 B. Hillman 
Bailey Broadcasting 
Scholarship for the fall 
semester. 

A senior broadcasting major, 
Soileau is a 1 981 graduate of 
Amy Bradford Ware High 
School. 

At Northwestern, he is a 
member of Kappa Sigma 
Fraternity, entertainment 
editor of the Current Sauce, 
student newspaper and 
member of the Student 
Ambassadors student 
recruiting team. He served 
over the summer as a 
counselor for the Inside View 
orientation. 

Soileau, who is interested in 
the disc jockey, production 
and sales aspects of 
broadcasting, is serving an 
internship this fall at KNOC- 
KDBH under the supervision 
of George Cook, the stations' 
operation manager. 




fbports 

Sports 



CURRENT SAUCE 
Oct. 2,1984 
Vol. 73, No. 7 



T3\ 

13 



NLU Who? 



NSU shocks Indians for first- ever win in Malone, 27-10 



Northeast entered Satur- 
day's contest with NSU in 
Monroe a 10-point favorite, 
but the Demons had other 
ideas, silencing the crowd of 
1 8.553 with a convincing 27- 
1 upset win. 

It was the second straight 
year that a Demon squad has 
upset a top-five NLU team. 
Last year, Northwestern 
shocked fifth-ranked Nor- 
theast, 13-9, and kept the 
Indians from gaining an NCAA 
playoff berth. Likewise, NLU 
was ranked number five going 
in to Saturday's game. 

Northwestern improved to 
2-2 on the year, while NLU 
slipped to 3-1 . 

An Northeast fumble on the 
NSU 31 early in the first 
quarter started things rolling 
for the Demons. After three 
unsuccessful attempts at 
yardage, punter Mike Crow 
dropped back on fourth down. 
Instead of kicking the ball, he 
passed it to Anthony Gibson, 
who raced down the sidelines 
to the NLU 37. A personal 
foul penalty against the indians 
brought the ball to the 22. 
Four plays later a Benny 
Brouillette field goal gave NSU 
a 3-0 lead. 

Northeast recovered the 



lead with 27 seconds left in 
the first quarter with a 70-yard 
drive. Indian Jimmy Harris 
scored on an 11 -yard 
scamper, and the Indians were 
up, 7-3. 

Northwestern roared right 
back with quarterback Wayne 
Van's first play of the second 
quarter. Van hit Odessa 
Turner at midfield, and Odessa 
was untouched as he raced to 
the end zone, completing a 
71 -yard TD strike. Brouillette 
made it 10-7 NSU. The 
Demons would never trail 
again. 

On the ensuing kickoff, 
Indian star Buggs Lewis was 
nailed by Keith Childress. 
Demon teammate Todd 
Squires recovered on the NLU 
27, and the NSU offense was 
again in business. Van's 1 1 - 
yard pitch to Roy Fontenot, 
combined with another PAT by 
Brouillette, gave the visitors a 
17-7 lead. 

By this time, only the small 
purple-clad groups of people 
dotting Malone Stadium could 
be heard. 

Northeast cut the lead with a 
10-play, 58-yard drive to set 
up Scott Martin's 29-yard field 
goal, closing the margin to 1 7- 
10. This ended first half 



Scoreboard 



LSU 23, Southern California 3 

The Tiger defense came alive in Los Angeles to keep LSU 
unbeaten in four games. USC dropped to 2-1 with the loss. 

LA Tech 1 7, North Texas State 1 2 

The Dogs picked up the second win in five games. NTSU lost 
its second straight Southland Conference game. 

Southwest Texas 39, Central Florida 1 3 

The Bobcats, NSU's opponent this week, raised their record 
to 3-1 by beating CFU (doesn't everybody?) 

Stephen F. Austin 37, Abilene Christian 21 

Gulf Star-foe SFA is now 4-1 after clobbering Abilene 
Christian, who fell to 1 -3 on the season. 

Southeastern 28, Western Kentucky 

The Lions won the first game in four outings in a battle bet- 
ween winless squads played in Hammond. 

Mississippi 19, Tulane 14 

Ole Miss dogged Tech last week, and called on another 
Louisiana opponent for another win this week. 

Grambling 42, Prairie View 

Eddie Robinson's Tigers had little, if any, problem disposing of 
PVU. 

Memphis State 23, Southern Mississippi 13 

USM lost another game this week, dropping them to 1 -3 on 
the year. The Eagles host NSU in five weeks. 



scoring. 

The third quarter saw little 
action, as the defenses came 
alive. Brouillette kicked a 43- 
yarder for the Demons near 
the end of the third to put 
Northwestern on top, 20-1 0. 

Early in the final quarter, a 
fumble by NLU quarterback 
Bubby Brister set the Demon 
offense up at midfield. Van 
pitched a 28-yarder to 
freshman John Stephens 
brought NSU to the Indian 1 6. 
Van cruised into the end zone 
two plays later. Another 
Brouillette PAT followed, and 
the Demons ended scoring, 
27-10. 

Northwestern's fifth-ranked 
defense made NLU cough up 
the ball six times, three on 
fumbles and three on in- 
terceptions, two of them made 
by All-American Michael 
Richardson. 

NLU picked up 24 first 
downs to Northwestern's 1 4. 
The Indians also outdistanced 
NSU on total yardage by a 
373-349 count. 

Unfortunately for Northeast, 
the Indians also led in tur- 
novers, 6-1 . 



Wayne Van 
Earns GSC 
Honors 

Wayne Van, quarterback, 
has been named as GSC 
Offensive Player of the Week. 
After two bad starts (losses to 
McNeese and Angelo State) 
and sitting out the ACU game 
with a shoulder injury. Van 
went home to Monroe to lead 
the Demons to a 27-1 upset 
of fifth-ranked Northeast. 

For the night, Van com- 
pleted 8 of 1 4 passes for 1 90 
yards, with two touchdowns 
and just one interception. The 
scoring passes covered 71 
and 16 yards, and Van ran 9 
yards for NSU's last points of 
the evening. 

Van did not start the game, 
but the 6-2, 203-pound junior 
came in near the end of the 
first quarter. From then on, 
Demon Dynamite exploded. 




hive plus five equals... 

No, Demon fullback Frank Graham isn't doing simple 
addition, (except to Northwestern's side of the score board) 
but he's about to catch a Wayne Van pass in the second 
quarter of the NLU game in Monroe. 



Demon Profiles 



RICKEY AINSWORTH 

Rickey Ainsworth, a 
senior from Tallulah, was 
named Most Valuable 
Offensive Player for the 
Demons last year. Con- 
sistency has been the 
trademark for Ainsworth, 
NSU's starting center. 

Thus far in 1984, he has 
shown both great effort and 
consistency while helping 
to lead the Demons to two 
consecutive wins. 

In high school, Ainsworth 
earned four varsity letters 
and was listed as North 
Louisiana Blue Chip 
Prospect after his senior 
season. 



ELLIOT DAWSON 

Elliot Dawson, 
sophomore from Hallsville, 
TX, is a starting running 
back for the NSU offense. 

Dawson ranks sixth in the 
Gulf Star with 214 yards 
rushing. In spite of only 
playing in five games last 
season, he was Nor- 
thwestern's leading rusher. 
He lettered last season, his 
first at NSU. 

During his prep career at 
Hallsville High, Dawson was 
named All-East Texas and 
All-State. 

He is the youngest of 1 
children, and is a health and 
physical education major at 
Northwestern. 



Southwest Texas State (3-1 ) at Northwestern (2-2) 



Mascot: Demons 
Enrollment: 6,100 
Colors: Purple, white, and orange 
Location: Natchitoches, LA 
Founded: 1884 
Conference: Gulf Star 
Affiliation: NCAA Div. I-AA 
1983 record: 4-7 




Mascot: Bobcats 
Enrollment: 18,400 
Colors: Maroon and Gold 
Location: San Marcos, TX 
Founded: 1903 
Conference: Gulf Star 
Affiliation: NCAA Div. I-AA 
1983 record: 9-2 



Demons Face Three NCAA Participants In 84 



Three games against NCAA 
tournament participants from a 
year ago, a new conference 
schedule and appearances in 
two tournaments within the 
state highlight the men's 
basketball schedule for this 
season. 

The Demons will open the 
season on the road against 
Southwest Conference op- 
ponents Texas and Southern 
Methodist. While Texas is 
expecting a strong team this 
year, SMU will be one of the 
top teams in the nation. The 
opener at Texas is scheduled 
for Nov. 29. 

The SMU Mustangs return 
all five starters from a year ago 
after losing in the NCAA 
tournament by a single point to 
eventual champion 
Georgetown. The Mustangs 
also feature center Jon 
Koncak, one of two Olympians 
the Demons will face during 
the season. SMU was 25-8 a 
year ago. 



After those opening two 
games the Demons will play in 
the Northeast Pacemaker 
Classic for the second straight 
year, meeting the host Indians 
in the first round. Other teams 
in the tournament include 
Centenary and Southern. 

From there it's a trip to 
Lafayette for the USL Bud- 
weiser Bayou Classic, hosted 
by the Ragin Cajuns, who 
advanced to the NIT Final Four 
last season. Tournament 
pairings have not yet been 
announced while the other 
teams in the tournament in- 
clude Southeastern and 
Drexel. 

The Demons will open the 
home season on Sunday, 
December 16, with an af- 
ternoon contest against 
Chicago State, a new team on 
the Demon slate. Louisiana 
Tech, another NCAA team a 
year ago, will visit Prather 



Coliseum 
evening. 



the following 



Along with SMU and LA 
Tech, the third NCAA par- 
ticipant from a year ago on the 
Demon schedule in Oklahoma. 
The Demons will visit Norman 
on January 12. Last season 
the Sooners, behind the 
leadership of Olympian 
Wayman Tisdale, posted a 28- 
5 record. 

The 1 0-game conference 
schedule includes home and 
home dates with all five GSC 
schools. Other teams on the 
Demon schedule include 
Southern Centenary and 
Arkansas-Little Rock, as the 
Demons will meet three teams 
on a home and home basis. 

The road dates with Texas, 
Southern Methodist and 
Oklahoma are one game 
contracts for just one season, 
as is the home contest with 
Chicago State. 

There's no doubt that this is 




Please Score A Touchdown! 

Coach Sam Goodwin appears to be begging to his offensive line during Northwestern 's 
big win over Northeast last Saturday. He's probably congratulating them, however, as the 
Demons led 20-10 at this point. Pictured with Goodwin is Rob Fabrizio, who started the 

NLU game at quarterback. " 

.\rtt uoy vAtw v'.f.M ledrflOffl rr>>;-) <;i3"? » — — 



a very demanding schedule, 
especially early in ' the 
season," said Wayne Yates, 
head coach "Texas will be 
strong and SMU will be ranked 
in the top five in the nation, as 
will Oklahoma." 

"But this will be a great 
chance for our young players 
to pick up experience against 



the best competition," added 
Yates. "We feel that after the 
strong opening portion of the 
year that we will be ready to 
make a successful debut in 
the conference race." 

The Demons return four 
lettermen from the 1983-84 
team that posted a 6-22 
overall record. 




fopur us 

Sports 

Qnnrtc 



CURRENT SAUCE 
Oct. 2,1984 
Vol. 73, No. 7 



15 

JLE. 



Lady Demons Looking To Win Again 



A bid for a sixth straight 
winning season and the first 
year of competing for a 
conference championship are 
challenges the Lady Demon 
basketball team will face 
during the 1984-85 season 
as Coach Pat Pierson has 
announced the schedule for 
this coming season. 



The Lady Demons wil face a 
27-game schedule while 
trying to improve on the 15-11 
mark of a year ago. Included in 
those 27 games are 10 
games within the Gulf Star 
Conference, two tournament 
appearances and home-and- 
home dates with some of the 
best competition to be found 



in the South. 

Northwestern State will 
open the season by hosting 
the Lady Demon Christmas 
Classic, a four team tour- 
nament that will be played in 
Prather Coliseum on Nov. 29- 
30 as part of the activities of 
the Christmas Festival 
weekend. The Lady Demons 




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will meet USL in the first round 
of the tourney while LSU and 
Southern Mississippi will also 
meet. The two winners and 
two losers will meet on the 
following night. 

The other tournament on the 
schedule is the Lady Pack 
Classic at the University of 
Nevada-Reno on January 4-5. 
The Lady Demons have not 
lost a game in Reno in either of 
the past two years. 

The Gulf Star Conference 
schedule, the first conference 
race ever for the Lady 
Demons, features 10 games, 
including home-and-home 
dates with Nicholls State, 
Southeastern LA, Sam 
Houston State, Southwest 
Texas State and Stephen F. 
Austin. 

Following the opening 
tournament the Lady Demons 
will later play road games at 
LSU and USL while home-and- 



home games will be played 
against McNeese, Northeast, 
Grambling, Alcorn State and 
Delta State. Lamar will also 
pay a visit to Natchitoches 
during the season. 

"We are excited about 
hosting our own tournament 
this year and of course our trip 
to Reno has been a highlight 
the past two seasons," said 
Pierson of the upcoming 
schedule. "Everyone is ex- 
cited about a conference 
championship and our non- 
conference schedule is ex- 
tremely difficult. Northeast and 
LSU are two of the best teams 
in the nation and the other 
schools we play in this area 
are strong year in and year 
out." 

The Lady Demons, who will 
not have a senior on the squad 
in 1984-85, return three 
starters and eight let- 
terwinners from the 1 983-84 
team. 




Eugene Christmas 







'Smiley 9 : 

Have you ever paid attention 
to players who are hurt during 
a football game? 

That man in white who 
always seems to be there at 
the right time is Nor- 
thwestern's own Eugene 
Christmas, athletic trainer for 
the Demons. One look at Mr. 
Christmas will tell you why he 
is often called "Smiley." 

Christmas received both his 
bachelor's degree and his 
master's degree from Nor- 
thwestern. He has been the 
head athletic trainer since 
July, 1964, and has earned 
the respect of football players 
and other athletes, past and 
present. Not only does he love 
NSU but he loves each and 
every team member. Many 



A true asset to the 
NSU community 

residents of Natchitoches and 
Northwestern students feel 
privileged to have someone 
like Mr. Christmas as an asset 
to this community and the 
University. 

In 1976, Christmas was 
named "Man of the Year" in 
Natchitoches Parish. In 1981 
he was honored on the final 
night of the season when NSU 
defeated rival Northeast 41-9, 
by having it declared "Eugene 
Christmas Day." During 
ceremonies at the contest, 
Christmas was also inducted 
into the Northwestern 
Graduate Club Hall of Fame. 

If you are ever at the 
Fieldhouse stop by and meet 
Mr. Christmas, his smile will 
make your day. 



T5" 

1-^ CURRENT SAUCE . 
fi Oct. 2, 1984 
Vol. 73, No. 7 

ll_G 

Centennial Deserves 
Our Support 

In honor of Northwestern's 1 00 years comes word 
number four from the Demon Dictionary: 

Centennial - observance of a 100th birthday. At 
NSU, a year-long celebration which culminates 
this weekend. 

For the last few years, the NSU community has 
eagerly awaited the centennial celebration-a 
celebration that will put all problems aside and reflect 
on the past century. 

That celebration is now. This weekend, thousands 
of alumni and visitors are expected in Natchitoches 
for the festivities, and there will be plenty to do. 

The highlight of the weekend should be the 
Centennial Ball in the Coliseum on Saturday night. 
Organizers of the event are promising a first-class 
extravaganza. It should be good. 

Combine that with the football game. How 'bout 
them Demons! From the way NSU played in Monroe 
against a top-five NLU squad, look out Southwest 
Texas! Should the Demons beat the Bobcats this 
weekend, Northwestern will be the favorite to win the 
first-ever Gulf Star championship. 

School spirit aside, and back to the centennial. 

Friday morning's convocation should also be good. 
Art Linkletter is an excellent speaker, and the nature 
of this event will make it even more exciting. 

All of that, plus the TNT/Demon Dynamite activities 
and the increased school spirit that promotion has 
brought with it, should make for one great 
homecoming weekend. 

NSU students should make it a point to be on 
campus this weekend. This is something your 
children will like to hear. It may sound silly now, but 
so do most things when they're happening; history 
makes them priceless. I wonder how many 
Louisianans in 1 884 thought a small teachers school 
in Natchitoches would later become a major 
University with tens of thousands of alumni? 
Probably very few... 

With an increased main campus enrollment, more 
school spirit, and excellent academic programs, 
Northwestern is on the right track for the next 
hundred years. But for now... 

Happy Birthday, Northwestern! 
John Ramsey 

Editor 



viewpoint 
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Letter to the Editor 

Dear Editor 

The fall contest deadline for NSU's Literary arts magazine, 
Argus, has been set for November 1 0, 1 984. This date will be 
the cut-off point for those literary pieces that are to be con- 
sidered for the magazine's fall literary competition. 

These works include poetry, prose, essays, and short stories. 
Each entry should be turned in with a cover card (available at the 
Argus office, Kyser 316A) attached. Deadlines for the Art and 
Photograph contests will be announced at a later date. 

All NSU students, regardless of major, minor, race, creed, 
meal ticket plan, etc., are invited and encouraged to submit their 
works. Argus is a magazine for and by the student body. 

If you are interested in becoming a member of the Argus staff 
feel free to attend staff meetings to be announced in the Current 
Sauce or contact Leslie Gregory, either at the magazine office 
or at 357-0377, after 6:30 p.m. 

Leslie Gregory 
Editor 



elebration of a Century 

1884-1984 



Dorm Life 
Interesting 
For All 



Dorm life can be fun, hectic, and hilarious for 
the people who live there. But what is it like for 
the other residents? 

A typical scenario might be: 

Rosa Roach, a long-time resident of West 
Varnado Hall, gets up every night at 7:00 to 
take her normal stroll down the hall, inspecting 
each room as she goes. Once in the popular 
Varnado lobby, she promptly makes her 
presence known with a waltz through a card 
game in progress. The card game suddenly 
ends. 

On to the kitchen to be among friends, to say 
the least. Kitchen raids are Rosa's favorite part 
of dorm life. 

After an hour of partying and prank playing, 
which includes invading pizza parties, flying at 
passers-by. and popping in and out of purses, 
Rosa and friends procede to have a Fiesta on 



the porch. 

When Varnado quiets down, Rosa gets 
together with her comrades to explore another 
part of the dorm. 

Of course, all roaches, from the newborn to 
the old and creaky, participate in these ac- 
tivities. 

The night is spent scurrying about, until the first 
residents wake for that dreaded 8:00 class. 
Then its back to bed for Rosa and company. 

With all the telephones, slamming doors, and 
noisy pipes. Rosa now finds it too noisy to 
sleep, she still enjoys Varnado, however, as 
do all her friends. Since little effort is made to 
remove Rosa, she'll probably be around the 
dorm long after we're all gone. And just think, 
Rosa didn't have to pay a dorm rental increase 
this year, either... 

by Robin Gunter 




John Ramsey 
Editor 

Lisa Williams 
Managing Editor 

Stacy Scroggins 
Business Manager 

Lucy LeBlanc 
Darlene Winslow 
Advertising 

Kim Nolde 
Sports Editor 

Robin J. Gunter 
News Editor 

Bubba Soileau 
Entertainment 

Scott Cox 
Bryan Williams 
Gena Williams 
News Staff 

Russel Bienvenu 
Circulation Manager 

Kevin Hopkins 
Don Pearce 
Darlene Winslow 
Shawn Wyble 
Photographers 

Peter Minder 
Adviser 

Current Sauce is 
published weekly by 
students of Northwestern 
State University of 
Louisiana. It is student- 
run and financed, and is 
not associated with any of 
the University's colleges 
or departments. Staff 
members are selected by 
the Editor, with the ap- 
proval of the Student 
Media Board. 

Editorial and business 
offices are located at 
225A Kyser Hall. Office 
hours are 1-4 p.m. 
Tuesday through Friday. 
The telephone number is 
(318) 357-5456. 

All correspondence 
should be brought by the 
office or mailed to Box 
5306, NSU, Natchitoches, 
LA 71497. Deadline for 
both advertising and copy 
is 1 p.m. on the Thursday 
preceding Tuesday 
publication. 

Current Sauce is en- 
tered as second class 
mail in Natchitoches, LA. 
USPS number 140-660. 




Oct. 8,1984 
Vol. 73, No. 8 



Current Sauce 



NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY 

NATCHITOCHES, LA 



Celebration Of A Century, 1884-1984 




Bell: American Education 
Headed for 'Renaissance' 



Centennial Speaker 

T.H. Bell, secretary of education, spoke at Saturday's 
Centennial Luncheon. Bell said that after years of decline, 
the American education system is looking up. 



America's education system 
is now on the right track after 
declining for many years, and 
is headed for a "renaissance," 
said T.H. Bell, secretary of 
education, at Saturday's 
Centennial Luncheon. 

However, Bell did not paint 
an entirely rosy picture of 
education in the United 
States. 

"The American teaching 
profession is in great difficulty 
at this time," Bell said. "We 
need to be able to attract the 
brightest and most able 
students, and we're not doing 
it." 

"We can't attract the top 
talent if we pay the bottom 
salaries," he said. 

Bell said he favors a stricter, 
more structured environment, 
with more required subjects 



and less electives and school 
time for activities. He favors a 
merit pay system and in- 
creased salaries, which he 
said should come from the 
states - not the federal 
government. 

The Louisiana Legislature 
can levy the same taxes we 
can. Why let the dollar take a 
round trip to Washington and 
come back. You know how 
much we shave it for before it 
gets back here. So I'd like to 
see it done on the state level." 

Between now and 1 990, 
Bell said, the nation will need 
about 1 million new teachers 
due to retirements and other 
factors. 

Last year, Bell's National 
Commission on Excellence in 
Education released the 
controversial "A Nation at 



Risk" report on the sad state 
of American education. 

Since then, Bell said with a 
smile, "48 states have 
drastically raised their 
graduation standards." 

He added that scores on 
this year's college entrance 
examinations were up for the 
first time in 20 years. And the 
scores on the SAT for those 
declared to be majoring in 
education went up 1 1 points. 

Bell said President Reagan 
has pushed for the back-to- 
basics education. He added 
that he took a break from 
campaigning for "the boss" to 
speak at the NSU luncheon. 

Reagan is committed to both 
student aid despite "criticisms 
to the contrary." He said that 

See "Bell" 
on page 2 



Mr., Miss NSU Runoffs Set for Wednesday 



Elections for Mr. and Miss 
NSU will be held Wednesday 
from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. in the 
Union lobby. 

Russell Bienvenu and Ron 
Cook are finalists for Mr. NSU, 
while Miss NSU candidates 
are Darlene Brown and Cindy 
Ernst. 



Results from last week's 
election are: 

Mr. NSU - Cook, 185; 
Bienvenu, 1 59; Jon Robbins, 
93; Mike Miguez, 69; John 
Sacker, 53; and Tim Jacobs, 
36. 

Miss NSU - Brown, 186; 



'Cuckoo's Nest' 
Begins Friday 



The play One Flew Over the 
Cuckoo's Nest by Dale 
Wasserman, based on the 
novel by Ken Kesey, will be 
presented at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 
1 2, 13, 15, and 16 in the A. A. 
Fredericks Center Auditorium. 

A later movie version One 
Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest 
won Jack Nicholson the Oscar 
f °r best actor after critics 
acclaimed his performance as 
McMurphy, a prisoner who 
'nes to avoid work farm details 
& y getting himself admitted to 
a state mental hospital, where 
|je succeeds in bringing out 
* n e humane qualities of the 
insane. 

Starring in the principal roles 
| r e Britt Solano as McMurphy, 
Robert Guy as Chief Bromden, 



and Dr. Gail Lewis as Nurse 
Ratched. 

Appearing in other roles will 
be Tony Smith as Dale Har- 
ding, Trevor Dean as Billy 
Bibbit, Keith Woods as 
Scanlon, Jack Dowdell as 
Cheswick, Levern McLemore 
as Martini, and San Allen as 
Candy Starr. 

Also others in the cast are 
Jerome Cox as Aide Warren, 
Johnny Cox as Aide Williams, 
Melanie Lea as Nurse Flynn, 
Scott Nicholson as Ellis, Steve 
Tolivar as Ruckly, Ronald 
Turner as Fredricks, Bob 
Burkhead as Sefelt, Stephen 
Speights as Dr. Spivery, Dr. 
Bill Bryant as Col. Matterson, 
Debbie Gray as Sandra, and 
Herman Brown as Turkle. 



Ernst, 95; Sharon Sampite," 
85; Laurie Weaver, 78; Janice 
Duggan, 67; Carla Roberts, 
43; Eileen Haynes, 37; and 
Brenda Foster, 30. 

Runffs for freshman and 
junior class senators were 
held along with Mr. and Miss 
elections. Results for 
freshman class are: 

"Brother Dave" Decuir, 
110; Charlotte Zumwalt, 98; 
Bryan K. Williams, 74; and 
Donna Lewis, 65. Decuir and 
Zumwalt were eleceted. 

The junior class voted: 

Paula Simmons, 45; Tommy 
Moore, 39; Frank Morris and 
Greg Shoalmire, 36 each. 
Simmons and Moore will take 
office. 

Northwestem's State Fair 
court was also elected. 
Eighteen ladies vied for the 
nine positions. 

Marsha Kay McLarmore was 
voted as Queen by the 
student body. The court 
consists of Brunetta Anthony, 
Rita Davis, Christy Dickey, 
LaJoyce Gaulden, Kecia 
Guillory, Carla Roberts, 
Michaela Sampite, and Sharon 
Sampite. 

The Queen and her court 
will be presented at the State 
Fair Classic vs. Louisiana Tech 
in Shreveport next Saturday. 




Russet Bienvenu 



Ron Cook 




Darlene Brown 



Cindy Ernst 



2 



CURRENT SAUCE 
Oct. 9, 1 984 
Vol. 73, No. 8 



News 
News 



M 



NEWS 
BRIEFS 



KAPPA ALPHA 
PLEDGES FOUR 

New pledges to Kappa 
Alpha Order are Dwight 
Bordelon, John Burge, Tod 
Klotzbach and Craig 
Poleman. 

According to Jim Martin, 
corresponding secretary, 
pledge class officers are 
David Bennet, president; 
Landon Mathis, vice- 
president; and Eric 
Madson, treasurer. 

Kendall Acosta was 
recently initiated. 

TRI-SIGMA 
HAS EXCHANGE 

Northwestern 's baseball 
players hosted an ex- 
change with Sigma Sigma 
Sigma on Sept. 26, said 
Mignona Cote, public 
relations chairman. 

Susan Arthur was 
crowned Homecoming 
Queen on Saturday. Other 
Tri-Sigmas that were on the 
court were Theresa 
Guillory, Eileen Haynes and 
Yevette Jordan. 

Donna Jo Kelly and 
Charlotte Zumwalt are 
recently-elected SGA 
senators. 

COMEDIAN RETURNS 
WEDNESDAY 

Comedian Steve Moore 
will return to Northwestern 
Wednesday for a per- 
formance in Union Station, 
beginning at 5 p.m. Full- 
time NSU students will be 
admitted free with their ID 
cards to this SAB- 
sponsored event. 

DELTA SIGMA THETA 
HOLDS RUSH PARTY 

Delta Sigma Theta 
sorority held its fall 1984 
rush party on August 29th. 
According to Marva Moxey, 
public relations chairman, 
they have had window 
washes and dances. 
Recently, they participated 
in a Pan-Hellenic stomp 
show in Sabine parking lot. 

Susan Combest and 
Carmel Preyan were on the 
Homecoming Court. 
Brunetta Anthony was 
elected to serve on the 
State Fair Court. 



Yearbook Pictures 
Continue Tonight 



Organization pictures for the 
1 985 Potpourri will continue 
to be taken tonight and 
tomorrow night, according to 
Jan Chatelain, organizations 
editor. 

Tuesday's schedule calls for 
SAM, 6:20; Beta Gamma Psi, 
6:30; Le Cercle Francais. 
6:40; IEEE, 6:50 NAIT, 7:00; 
Purple Jackets, 7:10; Blue 
Key, 7:20; Alpha Eta Rho, 
7:30; Phi Alpha Theta, 7:40; 

Sigma K 
Holds 
Party 

The members of Sigma 
Kappa would like to thanK 
everyone who has supported 
them during the semester by 
attending fundraisers at the 
Student Body and stopping at 
Maggio's during the window 
washes, according to Kathy 
Jenney, public relations 
chairman. 

These fundraising activities 
made it possible for them to 
hold their Dream Man Party on 
Sept. 18, at the Student 
Body. Each member invited 
three "men of her dreams," 
and the beau receiving the 
most invitations was kinged 
Sigma Kappa's Dream Man. 
Honors went to Greg 
Shoalmire. 

A Heart Sis party was held 
on Sept. 30, at which time the 
pledges received their 
signature books from their Big 
Sisters. 

Gregory 
To Edit 
Argus 

Leslie Gregory has been 
selected as editor of Argus, 
Northwestern's student 
literary arts magazine. 

Gregory was selected by 
the Student Media Board over 
two other candidates. 

Gregory's contributions to 
past editions of Argus include 
both her role as a contributor 
in 1 983, and a member of the 
editorial staff in 1 984. 

She would like to see 
several changes in the award- 
winning magazine, among 
them more input by art and 
music students. 



Delta Psi Kappa, 7:50; 
NACUS, 8:00; SLAE, 8:10; 
Student Ambassadors, 8:20; 
FWCC, 8:30; Geological 
Society, 8:40; and DPMA, 
8:50. 

The order for Wednesday is 
Pentecostal Fellowship, 6:20; 
Alpha Kappa Delta, 6:25; 
Periaktoi, 6:30; Black 
Knights, 6:40; Orienteering, 
6:50; Phi Kappa Phi, 7:00; 
Phi Eta Sigma, 7:10; FCS, 
7:20; FCA, 7:30; American 
Chemical Society, 7:40; 
NCAS, 7:50; Home 
Economics Club, 8:00; 
Wesley Foundation , 8:10; 
Holy Cross, 8:20; Alpha 
Lambda Delta, 8:30; Kappa 
Omicron Phi, 8:35; Alpha Mu 
Gamma, 8:40; lota Lambda 
Sigma, 8:45; and NSU 
Images, 8:50. 

On Thursday from 3-5 p.m. 
photographers will shoot 
Greek students who missed 
last week's pictures. The $1 
fee has been waived, and all 
students who paid the fee last 
week will have it reimbursed, 
according to Peter Minder, 
Potpourri adviser. 




Celebrating 100 Years 

University president Dr. Joseph Orze presents Governor 
Edwin Edwards with a Centennial paperweight from Tif- 
fany's of New York. Edwards spoke at the dedication of the 
Louisiana School last week. 



Bell 



continued from 
page one 

Reagan will preside over the 
largest education budget in 
federal government history 
this year. 

American schools should 
have a merit system for 
teachers, he said. "Teaching 
is nbw a dead-end job. We 



pay them by looking at a table 
of figures." 

He said that the Reagan 
administration would like to 
see a "master teacher" 
position created. This position 
would be the equivalent to a 
university professor. We 
would recognize those who do 
a good job." 



mal* 




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Lewis* 

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Jolene Anders, Inc. 
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Music to the 
Michelob Drinker's Ear. 

The sound of a 
Michelob being opened 
may escape the attention 

of most beer drinkers. 
But it does not go unsung 
by Michelob drinkers. 
They know that 
uncapping a cold Michelob 
is just the beginning of a 
very smooth and mellow experience. 
Just as surely as they know. . . 

Some things 
speak for themselves 



BEtmft 8USCH mC ' £' lOUa MO • SINCt 1896 



I 



Features 



4 

A. 



CURRENT SAUCE 
Oct. 9, 1 984 
Vol. 73, No. 8 



niti i 




r 





Sfeve Martin's Latest 
Is Another Great Film 



Steve Martin and Lily Tomlin play the same 
role in "All of Me." Well. ...almost. 

As Roger Cobb, Martin is an attorney who'd 
rather be a jazz musician. On his 38th birthday, 
he makes a vow to himself - to quit moonlighting 
with an unpaid jazz band, marry the boss' 
daughter, stop having fun and straighten out his 
life. 

At the same time, Edwina Cutwater is trying 
to straighten out her death. Portrayed by Lily 
Tomlin, she's a rich eccentric invalid, nearing 
the end of her bleak existance, who believes 
that money can buy anything, even mortality! 

Edwina hires a Far Eastern mystic to transfer 
her soul into the body of her stablehand's 



daughter. By leaving her fortune to this girl, 
Edwina can return from the grave and live a 
little. One problem. ..It doesn't work out that 
way. 

When Roger is assigned to revise Edwina's 
will, he's caught in the spiritual crossfire. The 
plan goofs and the late Edwina takes up 
residence in Roger's body instead. 

"All of Me" is very entertaining even though 
Steve Martin lacks the stupidity seen in his 
other motion pictures. Martin is however a fine 
comedian but places more emphasis on his role 
as an actor. PG rated from universal, this is one 
Steve Martin movie not to pass up. 

Bubba Soileau 



Louisiana Downs Trip Offered 



Die Laughing 

Steve Martin and Lily Tomlin star as Roger Cobb and 
Edwina Cutwater, whose lives become hilariously entangled 
when Edwina accidentally ends up sharing half of Roger's 
body. 



A trip to the horse races at 
Louisiana Downs in Bossier 
being sponsored 
Oct. 20, by the 
of Continuing 
and Community 



City is 
Saturday, 
Division 
Education 
Services. 



The $30 per person fee for 
the trip includes roundtrip 
transportation by the 
Trailways bus system, 
grandstand tickets to 
Louisiana Downs, and in- 
surance. 



Trip participants will depart 
from Caspari Hall at 1 1 a.m., 
arriving at Louisiana Downs at 
12:30 p.m. Post time for the 
first race is 1 p.m. , and the last 
race of the day is scheduled at 
6 p.m. 



Linkletter Calls for Rebirth of America 



Sixteen years ago, radio and 
TV personality Art Linkletter's 
daughter died experimenting 
with LSD. Today, he con- 
tinues to crusade for a rebirth 
of America. 

Linkletter was the guest 
speaker for the University's 
Centennial Convocation on 
Friday. 

He said that not only does 
drug use play a major role in 
the lives of many Americans, 
but the nation faces other 
problems - urban crime, 
divorce, and pornography. 

"It's a kind of unwinding of a 
whole civilization right before 
our eyes," he said. 

Linkletter added that he likes 
visiting small universities and 
small towns because the 
people represent a basic 
goodness. "This will be 
important in rebuilding the 
country," he said. 

He was born in Canada, and 



is the adopted son of a Baptist 
minister. He began his 
broadcasting career on radio, 
and his first big break came 
when he was granted an in- 
terview with President Franklin 
D. Roosevelt. 

The president was tied up, 
however, leaving Linkletter to 
ad lib. To fill time, he handed 
the microphone to a nearby 
woman and asked her opinion, 
and thus created the first 
"man-on-the street" interview. 

This "real people" approach 



continued on television, where 
Linkletter starred in "House 



On drug use, crime, 
pornography, etc. • "It's a 
kind of unwinding of a whole 
civilization..." 

•Art Linkletter 



Party" and "People are 
Funny." He is also the author 
of the highly-successful "Kids 
Say the Darndest Things." 
Also at the convocation, Joe 



Sampite, mayor of Nat- 
chitoches; Dr. Joseph Orze, 
president; and Cathy Ernst, an 
NSU freshman, also spoke. 

The Centennial Plaque, 
which has been placed across 
from Natchitoches Hall on a 
small brick stand donated by 



IFC, was presented at 
convocation. 



the 



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6 



CURRENT SAUCE 
Oct. 9,1984 
Vol. 73, No. 8 



bports 1 

Sports 



Southwest Texas falls at Demon homecoming 



The Empire Doesn't Strike Back; NSU Wins 



For Saturday's homecoming 
contest, Northwestern took 
the role of the rebels in "Star 
Wars" and thoroughly 
destroyed Southwest Texas 
State--the team touted to be 
the Gulf Star's "Empire." 

Southwest, winner of the 
NCAA Division II national titles 
in both 1981 and 1982, 
entered the NSU game as a 
jlight underdog thanks to 
Northwestern's convincing 
wins over Abilene Christian 
and Northeast. 

The final score of 28-7 lifted 
eyebrows in the stadium, and 
probably at stadiums around 
the conference. Nor- 
thwestern wasn't supposed to 
beat Southwest Texas. After 
all, very few teams ever beat 
the Bobcats. 

Northwestern started the 
game with a drive to the 
Bobcat 17, but the SWT 
defense forced NSU to at- 
tempt a field goal. Benny 
Brouilette's attempt was wide 
left. 

The next time the Demon 
offense touched the ball, 
things happened. 

First, fullback John 
Stephens scampered for 1 7 
yards to the Bobcat 35. Next, 
quarterback Wayne Van hit 
David Groman for a 30-yard 
crossing pattern. On just the 
third play of the 52-yard drive, 
tailback Elliott Dawson flipped 
into the end zone on a five- 
yard run. The kick by 
Brouilette was good. 

Southwest tied the game in 
the second quarter with an 8- 
play, 7 2 -yard drive, with 
tailback Rene Gonzalez 
slamming his way in from the 
one. The 'Cats added the 
extra point to make it a 7-7 
game. 

Four plays later, the 
numbers were moving again 
on the Demon side of the 
scoreboard. 

Van lofted a short screen 
pass to Stephens, who 
received key blocks from 
Rickey Ainsworth and Hal 
Harlan. Stephens cruised 51 
yards for the touchdown, 
giving the Demons a 14-7 
half time lead. 

Southwest Texas gave the 
game away early in the third 
quarter when Tank Berry 
recovered a Bobcat fumble at 
the Southwest 15. Dawson 
ran all three plays necessary 
for the touchdown, going in 
from three yards out. 
Brouillette again added the 
points, giving NSU a com- 
manding 21-7 lead over the 



slightly stunned visitors from 
San Marcos. 

Also in the third period, 
Mother Nature played tricks 
with the 1 0,300 fans in Turpin 
Stadium. Threatening clouds 
hovered overhead much of the 
game, and the rain poured 
midway through the period. 
The crowd, and the 
homecoming court sitting on 
the field near the student side, 
quickly ran for cover, 
crowding the under-side of 
Turpin's east side. 

As if the rain wasn't enough 
for Southwest Texas, a 
Freddy Smith interception put 
the Demons in business again 
midway through the fourth 
period. After driving from the 
SWT 41 to the 5, Van rolled 
the five yards for the TD. 
Brouillette again came in for 
the kick, and gave Nor- 
thwestern its final 28-7 margin 
of victory. 

Southwest never seriously 
threatened in the second half, 
and the 'Cats, who had been 
averaging over 400 yards per 
game, held Southwest to 104 
total yards in the second half, 
and just 271 yards for the 
evening. Northwestern 
amassed 399 yards total 
offense. 

NSU turned the ball over 
twice, while Southwest let it 
go three times. Demon 
quarterbacks completed 1 2 of 
20 passes, while the Bobcat 
signal callers completed just 9 
of 26 against Northwestern's 
nationally-ranked defense. 

For the Demons, Dawson 
picked up 95 yards on 17 
carries, while Chris Chenier 
added 85 yards on 1 5 rushes. 

Punter Mike Crow kept the 
Bobcats deep in their own 
territory with his thundering 
kicks. Rarely did Southwest 
get a punt outside their own 
10. 

Both teams went to 3-2 on 
the season. Southwest Texas 
State has lost both games on 
artificial turf; the Bobcats fell 
48-14 to Texas-Arlington two 
weeks ago. All three con- 
vincing Southwest Texas wins 
have come on natural sur- 
faces. 

In winning their third straight 
game, the Demons thrust 
themselves into the role of 
favorites for the Gulf Star 
championship. Along with this 
week's opponent, Nicholls 
State, the Demons are 1-0 in 
the conference. All other GSC 
teams have at least one 
conference loss. 




I Don't Want It 

NSU quarterback Wayne Van passes the ball to Chris Chenier during Saturday af- 
ternoon's 28-7 homecoming win over Southwest Texas State. Chenier rushed for nearly 
1 00 yards during the contest. NSU next faces Nicholls State on Thursday. 




Nicholls State (3-3) at Northwestern (3-2) 



Mascot: Demons 
Enrollment: 6,178 
Colors: Purple, white, and orange 
Location: Natchitoches, LA 
Founded: 1884 
Conference: Gulf Star 
Affiliation: NCAADiv. I-AA 
1983 record: 4-7 





Thursday night, 7 p.m., Turpin Stadium 



Mascot: Colonels 
Enrollment: 7,445 
Colors: Red and gray 
Location: Thibodaux, LA 
Founded: 1948 
Conference: Gulf Star 
Affiliation: NCAA Div. I-AA 
1983 record: 5-6 



Deann Cook dominates swimming 



Several IM Events Held 



Several major Intramural 
events have been held in the 
past three weeks, according 
toTootie Cary, director. 

The Swim Meet, coed 
softball, horseshoes, golf and 
punt, pass, and kick have all 
been held recently. 

The coed softball tour- 
nament with Kappa Sigma-Phi 
Mu beating the Kingpins- 
Sigma Kappa for the second 
time to win the championship. 
Kappa Sig-Phi Mu won the 
final game, 1 2-2, after earlier 
beating their opponents, 16- 
8. En route to the title, they 
also downed Blind Boys, 1 5- 
14, and Sigma Tau Gamma 
and Girls, 8-5. 

Kingpins-Sigma Kappa took 
second by beating KA-Tri-Sig, 
23-2, TKE No. 2, 22-2 and 



Sig Tau, 12-5. The Sig Tau 
and Girls team finished third. 

In the punt, pass, and kick 
competition team scores, 
Odyssey, Sigma Kappa, and 
Tri-Sigma No. 2 took first, 
second, and third. Men's 
winners were Yang No. 1 , 
Kappa Sigma No. 1 , and 
Sigma Tau Gamma No. 1 , first 
through third, respectively. 

Individually, the longest punt 
and kick in the women's 
category belonged to Julie 
Browning of Odyssey. Tootie 
Cary, also of Odyssey, had 
the longest pass. For the men, 
Gene Strogen of the Steelers 
has the longest punt, while 
fellow Steeler Joe James,; 
pass was tops. John Cun- 
ningham of Kappa Sigma had 
the best kick. 



Come to the Races! 




fun for all 



\ 



RACE 
NITE 

Thoroughbred racing 
on film 



State Fair Downs 
S.A.B. Lagniappe Committee 
S.U. Ballroom 
Tuesday, Octobe 1 6 at 7:30 p.m 

© 1975 Game Films. Inc., dpcinn*i. Ohio 



In the swim meet, Tri-Sigma 
won top honors for the 
women, while TKE won for the 
men. The Budmen and Kappa 
Sigma rounded out the mens' 
top three, while independent 
Deann Cook single-handedly 
won second place team 
points, and Louisiana Ladies 
finished third. 

In men's horseshoes 
singles, Bobby Askew of Yang 
took first, while Mike Sewell of 
TKE took second. TKE's Jeff 
Hartline and Lynn Lindsey of 
Kappa Sigma tied for third. 

In doubles, Askew and Joe 
Bienvenu won for Yang, Jeff 
Fonda and John Frost took 
second for Sig Tau; and again 
a Kappa Sig-TKE third-place 
tie: this time between Sigs 
Thomas Hardee-James Maxey 
and TKE's Jeff Hartline-Ward 
Yates. 

Women's singles saw 
Deann Cook take first, 
Louisiana Ladies' Theresa 
Manry at second, and another 
third place tie, this one bet- 
ween Stacy Brown of Phi Mu 
and Donna Jo Kelly of Sigma 
Sigma Sigma. 

In doubles, Manry and Cook 
won first, Pam Gardner and 
Charlotte Zumwalt of Tri-Sig 
took second; and to go 4-for- 
4, a third place tie occured 
between Donna Box-Angela 
Lasyone of Phi Mu and Leah 
Mills-Jodi Boudean of Sigma 
Kappa. 

Finally, in IM golf, Kappa 
Sigma's Randy Bonnette and 
TKE's Roy Roach tied with a 
37. The tie will be broken on 
Tuesday. Yang's Frankie Silva 
and Bill Bankston of KA tied for 
third. Both had scores of 40. 

In women's competition, 
Camille Hawthorne of 
Odyssey won with a 4 1 . One 
stroke behind was Sigma 
Kappa Laura Vincent, and 
Angela Lasyone of Phi Mu was 
five back at 47. 

FOR SALE 

Society for the Ad- 
vancement of Management, 
(SAM), has a Christmas 
Festival Booth for sale. Very 
reasonable price. Please call 
Mark at 352-331 9. 




Goin' Nowhere 

This Southwest Texas running back finds how tough the 
nationally-ranked Demon defense is during the Gulf Star 
battle between the Bobcats and NSU. 

TV contract cancelled; 
Thursday game still on 

The television contract between the Gulf Star Conference and 
the College Sports Network of Baton Rouge is over, according 
to Dave Waples, commissioner of the conference. 

Waples said Saturday that the network has failed to fulfill its 
obligations and the terms of the contract. CSN had agreed to 
televise 1 GSC games live, with one on tape delay. 

Five weeks into the contract, CSN has only shown two games 
live and did not even show up for Thursday's game between 
Southeastern and Sam Houston, said Waples. 

So far, only the LA Tech-Southeastern and Sam Houston- 
Stephen F. Austin games were shown live. Film crews shot the 
Sam Houston-Nicholls game but did not telecast it because of 
the CSN's failure to pay necessary satellite costs, Waples said. 

Since the deal is over, schools may move their Thursday 
games back to Saturday if they so desire. 

Tynes Hildebrand, athletic director, said that this week's 
contest with Nicholls State will remain on Thursday. "They 
(Nicholls) have already made travel arrangements, and it 
wouldn't be right to make Nicholls change them now." 

He said that the Sam Houston State game now scheduled for 
Thursday, Oct. 25, in Turpin Stadium, will "probably be moved 
back. Because of the TV contract, we switched dates with 
Natchitoches Central High for use of the stadium. We'll move it 
to Saturday if the high school can accomodate." 

A clause in the contract states that for every game scheduled 
to be shown live but not, CSN owes the Gulf Star $10,000. 
Therefore, the Gulf Star is owed $30,000, but the conference 
doesn't anticipate payment, Waples said. 

Suing the network for breach of contract is a possibility, said 
Hildebrand, but the decision will have to come from the 
presidents of the six member universities. 



I 



- ^Hl II II I ^ 



8 

Q 



CURRENT SAUCE 
Oct. 9, 1984 
Vol. 73, No. 8 



We've Still 
Got Problems 

The Demon Dictionary's word number five is 
something I know a little about: 

Current Sauce - the official student newspaper 
of Northwestern State University. Mainly used to 
line bird cages, provide cover from rain, or be 
rolled up to hit the dog. Sometimes, it is used 
for reading material. 

Actually, it's not that bad. 

Current Sauce has come a long way from last year, 
when readers were suggesting that the paper "be put 
to sleep as part of the centennial activities." We've 
improved both content and layout, but it seems 
whenever one problem is corrected, there are two 
more ready to take its place. 

The Sauce is still desperately short of staff 
members. Right now, about four or five people make 
up the writing end of the staff. We can't survive with 
numbers like that. To be a viable college newspaper, 
we need at least 10-12 staff writers. Maybe you 
worked on your high school paper, do well in English, 
or just enjoy creative writing. If so, we need you on 
the staff. Come by the office, Kyser 225A, today ! 

As always, organizations must turn in their own 
news briefs to the Sauce. This is nothing new, but 
you would think it's some new rule. A leader for 
group A complains of biased coverage for group B. 
Needless to say, group A, to this date, still has not 
turned in a single article. 

There's one in every crowd. 

Of course, money enters into everything. Each 
month, we get our computerized statement from the 
Comptroller's office. I still haven't mastered reading 
this maze of numbers. I think we're doing okay, 
however. Let's hope it's not one of these "a negative 
is good, but a positive is bad" situations. 

Despite the problems, we're moving ahead. We've 
had four good issues so far this fall. And we have 
more stuff planned. More features (both local and 
national), more cartoons, better pictures, and in- 
novative layout is on the way. 

Like Orson Welles' wine, the Current Sauce will 
take a little time to get to the point it should be. But if 
we waited to "sell no paper before its time," we may 
be here a while! 
John Ramsey 

Editor 




r> NORTHWESTERN xr 
Celebration of a centljri 

1884-1984 
>< 




Letter to the Editor 

Dear Editor 

State Fair Week begins Monday, and this year's activities 
promise to be the best ever. A schedule of events is listed 
below: 

Monday, October 15 

State Fair shirts on sale 
6:00 - NSU Bed Races - in front of Union, call 357-5286 to sign 
up. Only 2 per organization. 

8:00 - Air Band - Union ballroom, call 357-5693 to sign up. 

1 1 :00 - Midnight Breakfast - at Iberville Dining Hall - Meal ticket 

or cash 



Tuesday, October 1 6 

All-day Scavenger Hunt 
up in SGA office. 

7:30 - State Fair Downs - in Union ballroom 
casino games, etc. 
1 0:00 - NSU Mixer at the Student Body - free admission. 



minimum of 1 people to a team - sign 
horse races, 



Wednesday, October 17 

2:00-5:00 - Tailgate party on the west side of Turpin Stadium. 
3:30 - Rapelling contest - on the west side of the stadium - call 
357-5286 to sign up. 

7:00 - NSU vs. Tech - SGA football game - Ruston (Tech 
practice field) 

Thursday, October 1 8 

State Fair T-Shirt Day 
5:00 - State Fair Supper - at Iberville with Entertainers. 
6:00 - Bulldog Roast, pep rally, bonfire - in front of Iberville. 

Friday, October 1 9 

6:00 - pep rally in Shreveport at LeBossier' parking lot. 

Saturday, October 20 
1 :00 - Rally in the Alley - Shreve Square. 
6:30 - Presentation of the State Fair Court 
Stadium. 

7:00 - NSU vs. Tech - The only game that matters! 
dependence Stadium. 

Hope you enjoy the week. It has been planned for you - the 
students of Northwestern. If there any questions call 357- 
4501 or 357-5286. 

Sharon Sampite 
State Fair Chairman 



Independence 



In- 



Current 
Sauce 
Staff 



John Ramsey 
Editor 

Lisa Williams 
Managing Editor 

Stacy Scroggins 
Business Manager 

Lucy LeBlanc 
Dariene Winslow 
Advertising 

Kim Nolde 
Sports Editor 

Robin J. Gunter 
News Editor 

Scott Cox 
Gena Williams 
News Staff 

Russel Bienvenu 
Circulation 

Bryan Williams 
Layout 

Kevin Hopkins 
Photographers 

Peter Minder 
Adviser 

Current Sauce is 
published weekly by 
students of Northwestern 
State University of 
Louisiana. It is student- 
run and financed, and is 
not associated with any cf 
the University's colleges 
or departments. Staff 
members are selected by 
the Editor, with the ap- 
proval of the Student 
Media Board. 

Editorial and business 
offices are located 
Kyser Hall 225A. Office 
hours are 1-4 p-" 1 
Tuesday through Friday- 
The telephone number is 
(318) 357-5456. 

All correspondence 
should be brought by the 
office or mailed to P-0 
Box 5306, NSU, Nat 
chitoches, LA 71497. 
Deadline for both a 
vertising and copy is 
p.m. on the Thursday 
preceding Tuesday 
publication. The sub" 
scription rate is $6.00 p e ' 
semester. 

Current Sauce is 
tered as second clas s 
mail in Natchitoches, LA> 
USPS number 140-660. 




Oct. 16, 1984 
Vol. 73, No. 9 



Current Sauce 



ORTHWESTERN TATE NIVERSITY 

NATCHITOCHES, LA 



Celebration Of A Century, 18841984 



Despite Democratic Dominance 



Reagan downs Mondale In Sauce Poll 



A Current Sauce survey 
shows that if the national 
presidential election were held 
today on the Northwestern 
campus, the Reagan/Bush 
ticket would be carried back to 




the White House in a landslide. 

Fifty-seven percent of the 
132 students and staff 
members questioned plan to 
vote for "Reagan. The ticket of 
Mondale/Ferraro picked up 1 4 
percent, while 28 percent 
were still undecided. One 
percent said they would vote 
for another candidate. 

An overwhelming majority - 
92 percent - said that they 
thought Reagan would win the 



Ever have one 

of those days? 

John Paul Timberlake, a 
Tau Kappa Epsilon pledge, 
'Inds that things aren't 
going his way during NSU's 
rain-soaked game with 
Nicholls State on Thursday. 
TKE's football letters are, 
well, floating off the field- 



election. Only seven percent 
thought Mondale/Ferraro will 
win in two weeks. Again, the 
remaining one percent thought 
another candidate would win. 

Despite the Reagan/Bush 
survey victory, the Republican 
Party is still second at Nor- 
thwestern to the Democrats. 
The Demoncratic Party is the 
preference of 43 percent of 
the poll respondents, while the 
G.O.P. is favored by 25 
percent. A large 31 percent 
group claims to be in- 
dependent. 



Seventy percent said that 
they are currently registered 
to vote in the election, yet a 
much larger 89 percent said 
that they would register to 
vote. Registration for the 
November 6 election closed 
Friday. 

President Reagan also 
received passing marks for his 
performance as president. 
Nineteen percent thought 
Reagan deserved an "A", 
while 33 percent gave him a 
B. A "C" grade was given by 
38% of those surveyed, and 



eight percent gave the 
president a "D." Two percent 
gave the chief executive a 
failing grade. 

Most students were not 
particularly impressed with 
either candidate during last 
week's debate. Just 17 
percent felt that the debate 
had changed their opinions of 
either candidate. Twenty-five 
percent were undecided as to 
the effect of the debate on 
their opinion, while a majority - 
58 percent - remain un- 
changed in their feelings 



toward either ticket. 

Mondale is said to have won 
the debate by most national 
politcal experts, but Reagan 
and Mondale were almost 
dead-even at NSU. Reagan 
was declared the winner by 
27 percent of the respon- 
dents, while 29 percent said 



Q: Are you currently registered to vote? 

A: Yes, 92; No, 40 

Q: Do you plan to vote in the 1 984 election? 

A: Yes, 11 8; No., 14 

Q: What is your political party preference? 

A: Democratic, 57; Republican, 34; Independent, 40 

Q: How would you grade Ronald Reagan's performance as president? 

A: A, 25; B, 44; C, 51; D, 1 1; F, 3 

Q: Did the debate last week change your opinions of either candidate? 

A: Yes, 19; No, 66; Undecided, 29 

Q: In your opinion, who won the debate? 

A: Reagan, 34; Mondale, 36; Neither, 54 

Q: Which of the following should be made the major issue of the campaign? 

A: Religion, 1; Deficit, 41; Tax Increases, 13; Defense, 40; Nuclear Arms race, 40;other, 1 

:Q: Whom do you plan to vote for in the election? 

A: Reagan, 75; Mondale, 1 8; Undecided, 38 

Q: What candidate, in your opinion, will win the 1 984 election? 

A: Reagan, 122; Mondale, 9; Other, 1 




Mondale won. Forty-four 
percent said neither won. 

As for the main issue of the 
campaign, it's a three way 
race between defense, the 
deficit, and the nuclear arms 
race. Each issue represented 
30 percent of the total. Tax 
increases accounted for nine 
percent, while one percent 
thought religion was the major 
issue of the 1 984 campaign. 




Demons Enter Fair 
With No. 7 Ranking 

Not only does Northwestern enter this weekend's State Fair 
Classic in the unusual role of favorite, but the Demons also have 
something even more unusual - an NCAA IAA national Top 1 
ranking. 

The Football News weekly magazine has NSU pegged at 
number seven after the 1 9-0 Demon shutout of Nicholls State 
on Thursday night. Last week, the Demons were not ranked 
among the Top 20. 

In addition, the heralded Demon defense is ranked number 
one in the nation in scoring defense, allowing 8.5 points per 
game. 

As of press time, the AP and UPI IAA polls had not been 
released. 

The Demons have now won four straight games, three of 
which were against Top 20 teams - Abilene Christian, Nor- 
theast, and Southwest Texas. Of Northwestern's four wins, 
none has been closer than a 1 7-point margin. 

In addition, the nationally-respected Bob Harmon Forecast is 
picking the Demons as two-point winners against Louisiana 
Tech. Harmon predicts the final will be Northwestern 22, Tech 
20. NSU's archrivals from Ruston have won twelve of the past 
thirteen meetings. 



2 

o 



News 
News 



CURRENT SAUCE 
Oct. 16, 1984 
Vol. 73, No. 9 



M 



NEWS 
BRIEFS 



FWCC SCHEDULES 
MEETING 

The Forestry and Wildlife 
Conservation Club will meet 
Thursday in Biology 
Building 108. 

FWCC is devoted to the 
preservation, study and 
restoration of wildlife and 
their habitants. The meeting 
will begin at 5 p.m. and 
topics concerning forestry, 
wildlife and conservation 
projects will be discussed. 

For more information call 
Jerry Bolton at 357-1233, 
Ellen Dollar at 352-5813, 
or talk with Dr. Allen in 
Biology. 



THETA CHI INITIATES 
FOUR AS DAUGHTERS 

Last Wednesday Theta 
Chi initiated Cindy bor- 
delon, Do gie McNulty, 
Gay Scott, and Lisa 
Williams as the fraternity's 
Daughters of the Crossed 
Swords according to 
secretary Jon Mouser. 

They had a punk rock 
exchange with Sigma 
Kappa n September 25, 
he said. 

Theta Chi's next com- 
munity service project will 
be during the weekend of 
November 2-4 

ZETA PHI BETA 
ELECTS OFFICERS 

Zeta Phi Beta has elected 
the following as 1984-85 
officers: 

Dwanda Smith, president; 
Tami Lilly, vice-president; 
LaJoyce Gaulden, 
secretary-treasurer; Dwa- 
nda Smith, dean of 
pledges; Myrtis Douglas, 
dean of probate; and Myrtis 
Douglas, reporter. 

New pledges are Amy 
Smith from Gloster and 
Vicki Barnette from 
Shreveport. 

LaJoyce Gaulden is on 
the State Fair Court. 



McLamore 
Reigns As 
SF Queen 

Marsha Kay McLamore will 
serve this week as NSU's 
1984 State Fair Queen. 

As the queen, she will reign 
over a full week of activities on 
campus which will lead to the 
49th annual State Fair Classic 
and 72nd football games 
between Northwestern and 
Louisiana Tech at 7 p.m. 
Saturday in Shreveport's 
Independence Stadium. 

McLamore and the eight 
members of her court, along 
with the queen and court from 
Tech, will be formally 
presented Saturday during the 
pre-game ceremonies at 6:30 
p.m. 

McLamore performs with 
the Cane River Belles dance 
line and is a member of Phi Mu 
Sorority and the Kappa Alpha 
Rose Court. This fall, she 
served on the Centennial 
Homecoming Committee. 

Members of the State Fair 
Court are Brunetta Anthony, 
Rita Davis, Christie Dickey, 
Le Joyce Gaulden, Kecia 
Guillory, Carla Roberts, 
Michaela Sampite, and Sharon 
Sampite. 

Cont. Ed 
Sponsoring 

Classes 

The Division of Continuing 
Education and Community 
Services is sponsoring seven 
courses that begin between 
Oct. 22 and Nov. 3. 

These courses are designed 
for adults and older youth. 
They are non-credit and have 
no admission requirements. 
Students, faculty and staff are 
urged to cal the Continuing 
Education office (357-4579) 
to preregister for First Aid (no 
charge), Systematic Training 
for Effective Parenting, 
Watercolors, Self Hypnosis for 
Personal Effectiveness, 
Antiques and Central 
Louisiana, Creative 
Photography and Smocking 
Christmas Ornaments. 



Is it true you can buy jeeps 
for $44 through the U.S. 
government? Get the facts 
today! Call 1-312-742- 
1 142 Ext. 9543. 




Symphony Launches 
Membership Drive 



Marsha Kay McLamore, 
1984 State Fair Queen, will 
be presented at 6:30 on 
Saturday in Shreveport's 
Independence Stadium. 



The Natchitoches-Northw- 
estern Symphony Society has 
launched its membership drive 
for the 1984-85 season, 
according to membership 
chairman Lola Dunahoe. 

The season features or- 
chestra in its program on 
Friday, Nov. 30, in A. A. 
Fredericks Center Auditorium 
and Friday, March 1 , in the 
Concert-Recital Hall. 

The highlight of the season 
will be a beautifully-staged 
production of Lerner and 
Loewe's Broadway musical 
"Camelof on Thursday, 



Pom Pon Auditions Set 



For the spring semester 
Northwestern will award eight 
$250 scholarships to 
students who are selected to 
serve on the Basketball 
Cheerleading Pom Pom 
squad. Ons scholarship will 
also be awarded to a "Mic 
Man," according to Danny 
Seymour, the pom pom squad 
advisor. 

Students eligible to apply if 
they are enrolled at NSU for 
the 1984 - 85 school year, 
have a C average, and have 
dance experience and a 
charming personality, he said. 



Applications, which must be 
returned on or before October 
24, can be obtained from the 
Placement Office or the 
Department of Health and 
Physical Education. 

Tryouts are scheduled for 
3:30 p.m. on Friday, October 
26, in the P.E. Majors 
Building. Tryouts will consist 
of a skills demonstration 
evaluated by qualified judges 
and a personal interview 
conducted by a student- 
faculty team. Applicants will 
perform a routine learned at 
the tryouts. 



Friday and Saturday, April 25- 
27. The Departments of Music 
and Theatre-Media Art, the 
Artist Series and the Louisiana 
School are co-sponsoring the 
musical in the A. A. Fredericks 
Center Auditorium. 

Season membership 
categories and their rates are 
individual, $15; family, $30; 
sponsor, $50; patron, $150, 
and benefactor, $250. 

All events this season are in 
the A. A. Fredericks Center. 
Tickets for each attration will 
also be available on an in- 
dividual-event basis. 

Coloratura soprano Diane 
McNaron-Collins, who joined 
Northwestern 's vocal music 
faculty this fall, will be the 
guest soloist for the 
November 30 concert at 8 
p.m. This is the annual concert 
presented on the eve of the 
Natchitoches Christmas 
Festival. 

The March concert at 8 p.m. 
will be a chamber music 
program featuring oboeist 
Tony Smith of the instrumental 
music faculty as the guest 
soloist. 

The three April per- 
formances of "Camelot" will 
feature a nationally-known 
stage or television actor in the 
leading role. 



University Pharmacy 



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Timex Watches 20% Off 
Planters Snacks 



Elam Stokes RPH 





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100 for $4.89 



•Community Bulletin Board • 



University Pharmacy 

926 College Avenue 
352-9740 



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GRADUATE 

to the rich, smooth taste of MichelokLight. 



4 

A 



CURRENT SAUCE 
Oct. 16, 1984 
Vol. 73, No. 9 



"Features 

Features 



College eating habits are always interesting 



by Kathy Jenney 

Contributor 

Excerpt from a weekly 
phone call from daughter at 
college: 

"Are you eating well?" 

"Yes, Mom." 

"Are you sure?" 

"Of course I'm sure, Mom. 
Would I lie to you?" 

"Yes." 

"Well, that's besides the 
point. Would you like a list of 
everything I have consumed 
over the last week?" 

"Now, don't be smart. I'm 
just worried about you." 

Surprisingly, parents need 
not be when their children go 
away to school and live off 
campus. A large majority of 
them eat as well, if not better, 
then they did while at home. 

"I really taught myself to 
cook. Both of my parents 
worked, so if I was hungry, I 
was the one who had to do 
something about it," said 
Terri, a junior primary 
education major from For- 
dyce, Arkansas. 

"I was raised with a plate of 
meat and vegetables set down 
in front of me; maybe a sweet 
for dessert, or ice cream, but 
no junk food . Mama would slap 
us silly if she caught us with 
our 'hand in the cookie jar,' so 
to speak," she continued. 
Terri shares an apartment with 



Kathy, a sophomore business 
major from upstate New York. 

"When Kathy cooks, you 
can bet it's a date with 'Chef 
Boyardee.' My roommate 
makes stale bread and water 



much work it all is. It's easier 
to open up a can of raviolis." 

Terri frowned. "I guess it 
(eating habits) kind of rubbed 
off on me, because unless I 
have meat and some type of 




look good," Terri said. 

"My grandmother never let 
me near the kitchen," Kathy 
responded. "She had this 
paranoia that I was going to 
burn down the house. Then 
when I came down here, I 
lived with my aunt for a year. 
Well, she treated me like one 
of her own, and that included 
feeding me. I never had to 
think about what I was eating. 
But when I moved out on my 
own, I couldn't believe how 



vegetable to go with it, I feel 
as if I haven't eaten well. How 
she can eat that stuff in a can, 
I'll never know." 

"I know, I know, 'it's full of 
preservatives and it'll give you 
cancer," Kathy argued. "But 
what doesn't cause cancer 
nowadays? At least we know 
Burger King will never go out 
of business as long as I'm in 
Natchitoches." 



Mothers Will Always Worry 



by Craig Scott 

Contributor 

Mothers will worry, preach 
and cook, but the college 
student will ultimately form his 
own eating habits, good or 
bad. 

Living at home sometimes 
has a direct relation to the 
balanced diet of a college 
student. Says Jerry, a 
freshman living at home, "I 
usually eat three meals a day 
and snack some after school. 
There is always something to 
eat at home. And Mom has 
always believed in good old 
nutritious food." Lisa, who is 
also a freshman living at home 
eats "whatever Mom cooks. 
The last couple of days we've 
had the basic stuff, ham- 
burgers, hot dogs, meat loaf." 

It seems obvious, at least for 
these two students, that when 
Mom is around, so are the 
meals! However, some 
students who live in dor- 
mitories have also established 
fairly good eating habitsl'wheri 



the food is made available. 

Jill, a sophomore from New 
Orleans, eats breakfast, lunch 
and supper. "I have a meal 
ticket, and it's there, so why 
not? The dining hall sometimes 
has good food. I guess it's 
nutritious," says Jill. Don, a 
freshman from Shreveport, 
enjoys the dining hall, but 
often feels the need to 
supplement that with Wendy's 
or Mr. Gatti's. "I just 
sometimes feel that I don't get 
enough to eat," says Don, 
"and I certainly eat more than 
three meals a day!" 

While it is apparent that 
some students living at home 
and in the dorms do get the 
proper amount and types of 
food, on the other hand many 
do not. Debbie, a senior living 
with her parents and sisters, 
often goes without eating 
breakfast or lunch. "I simply 
don't have time," she says. "I 
go from school strftght to 
work and when I get home 



like eating. I will pick up a 
hamburger, so I don't starve or 
anything." 

And then there are those 
who don't live at home and 
don't live in the dormitories. 
Linda, who has her own 
apartment off campus, has 
three Tabs in her refrigerator. 
"I try to get a salad at Wendy's 
and I eat popcorn and Red 
Hots at the theater where I 
work. And I do go eat with my 
parents sometimes. I really 
don't feel like I get proper 
nutrition, but it helps me keep 
my weight down!" 

So some college students 
really have a problem. Many 
are not getting the proper 
amount of red meats and 
vitamins. And they say they 
can live without Mom? 

Proper nutritions is 
something many people learn 
late in life and college is a 
good time to get into the habit 
of giving yoW body the fuel it 
needs. 



Byron, on the other hand, a 
senior business administration 
major from Lake Charles, 
Louisiana, knows the values of 
good cooking. His kitchen 
shelves epitomize the ail- 
American pantry-everything 
from f rench cut string beans to 
a spare can of hot cocoa mix. 
And his freezer is well 
stocked, too. Chicken parts 
and ground beef, carefully 
wrapped for individual ser- 
vings, line the shelves of his 
frost-free Frigidaire. 

"The apartment might not 
be the cleanest, but I'll never 
starve," he smiled. 

He prides himself in knowing 
how to make his own roux 
without burning it, but 
stresses that he's not too 
proud. "I'll accept any 
homecooked food. If I can't 
eat it now I'll freeze it." 

When questioned about 
Kathy 's eating habits, he 



responded, "Sure, everybody 
goes oh food binges-pizza 
from Domino's, a 3/4 pound 
bag of M & M's, a frosty from 
Wendy's; but sooner or later 
you get sick of that garbage, 
and actually want something 
nutritious." 

If Kathy rooms with Terri 
long enough, she may be 
gourmet cook by the time she 
completes college. As for 
now, she cooks the meals on 
her designated days. 

"When I'm supposed 
cook, I try to prepare 
balanced mealThe closest I've 
come is hamburgers an< 
f rench fries." (Kathy is quick 
to note that she peeled and 
sliced the potatoes herself). 

"Kathy does try; I'll grant her 
that much. I think she needsa 
lot more practice at it, but 
she's on the right track. After 
all, I'm still alive," Terri sighed. 



■ sWrn^ir>S§§G f ?da!ir fJdrVti fefc -Ar^r ^ ^ 



5TUDE© 



NSU Mixer/Find the Bulldog j 

Free Admission! 



Wednesday 



$1.00 Tom Collins 
Wreck Tech party pack giveaway 

Thursday 





'A HOWLING EXPERIENCE' 



Crazy Drink Specials 
Trivial Pursuit 
Bathroom Boogie 
Cheer Contest 
Prize Giveaways 



INfcJWS 

News 



CURRENT SAUCE 
Oct. 16,1984 
Vol. 73, No. 9 



"ST 

5 



Environmentalist To 
Perform Next Week 



Environmental songwriter 
and singer, Bill Oliver, will 
appear in concert Tuesday, 
October, October 23, at 8 
p.m. in Union Station. Oliver's 
performance is being 
sponsored by Periaktoi, a 
campus organization for 
students majoring in 
sociology, social work or law 
enforcement. 

Raised in Missouri, 
Arkansas, Texas, and Penn- 
sylvania, Oliver began learning 
guitar and writing songs in 
grade school, and he played in 
rock bands during junior and 
senior high. Bill went to the 
University of Texas at 
Arlington from 1966-1968, 
working as a TV camera 
operator in Dallas. During this 
time he switched to acoustic 
guitar and harmonica, per- 
forming solo and in small folk 
groups. 



The next two years were 
spent in the U.S. Army with a 
trip to South Vietnam. Oliver 
formed a small folk group and 
made official and unofficial 
playing trips to villages, bases, 
hospital ships and USO clubs. 

Between 1970 and 1974, 
lived in Seattle, Phoenix, 
Cincinatti and rural Maryland, 
doing lots of cross-country 
hitch-hiking and driving. His 
songs reflect his impressions 
of western mountains and 
deserts, Puget Sound and the 
Ohio River Valley and 
Chesapeake Bay. 

Since 1974, Austin has 
been his home base. His 
interest in environmental and 
social causes has emerged 
through his music, producing 
material for specific and 
general issues, as well as 
personal ballads. 




Environmentalist 

Environmental singer Bill Oliver will perform next Tuesday 
in Union Station and in various classes on campus. 



State Fair has always been big 



Saturday night's football 
game will mark the 49th year 
that Northwestern's football 
team has met that of Louisiana 
Tech in the State Fair Classic 
game. 

In the years when the an- 
nual games were just 
beginning, State Fair Game 
day was a much-awaited event 
by Northwestern students. 
"We were free, at least for 
one day of the year," said 
NSU alumnae Lucille Hen 



dricks, who entered Nor- 
thwestern in the fall of 1926. 
Students were treated at 
school just as if they were at 
home, so we were always 
excited for the State Fair game 
so we could be free to do as 
we pleased." 

They were free to a certain 
extent, though. "We always 
had to have permission from 
our parents to go to 
Shreveport. We had to have 



Williams, who also enterea 
school here in the fall of 1 926 
and later became Lucille 
Hendrick's roommate. 

At that time, students would 
get up very early on the 
morning of the game and meet 
a train that would be going to 
Shreveport. "The train would 
be parked fairly near the 
fairgrounds and then we 
walked to the fair," Mrs. 
Williams said. 

'You always dressed up. It 



aiumriaw Lucme men- written letters," said Ora "You always dressed up V 
^★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★^ 

* Bustin' 



* 
* 
* 

* 

* 

* 

* 
* 



Makes Us 
Feel Good! 




State Fair Tickets: 

$5.00 -2 Per ID 
NSU Fieldhouse 
Sale Ends Noon Oct. 1 9th 

University Employees 
$5.00-2 Per Person 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 

* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



was THE day . You had to have 
a new outfit-gloves, hat, the 
works-and a huge pom pom 
chrysanthemum," reminisced 
Mrs. Hendricks 

Walking around the 
fairground was a tiresome 
time, the alumni both agreed. 
"We'd go to the grandstand in 
the afternoon just sc that we 
could sit down for a tit. If we 
had money, we woula try to 
win cupie dolls, but mos k ly we 
just walked around and looked 
at the exhibits," Mrs. Williams 
said. 

After the games the 
students were allowed to se? 
the .fireworks display and ther 
it was time to meet the train at 
10:30 p.m. where there 
would be a sort of roll call to 
make sure the students were 
back on the train. 

"We'd get back to Nat- 
chtioches at about 1 : 30 in the 
morning and of course we 
would have to go to church the 
next day, sleepy eyes or not," 
said Mrs. Hendricks. 

"We were always tired, but 
we had ourselves a time; It 
was fun, fun." 



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MORE 
BRIEFS 



PROFESSOR SPEAKING 
TODAY IN BIRMINGHAM 

Dr. Arlene Airhart is 
speaking today at a panel 
discussion of medical 
ethics at the third Southern 
Biomedial Engineering 
Conference in Birmingham. 

Airhart, an associate 
professor of nursing, has 
previously addressed 
nursing groups on ethical 
issues at the regional and 
state levels. 

The medical ethics panel, 
comprised of health care 
professionals from 
throughout the United 
States, will focus on the 
balance of the rights of 
patients, personal values, 
and moral issues with the 
technological capabilities 
available through the use of 
modern biomedial 
equipment. 



SAMPITE ADDRESSES 
S.A.M. MEETING 

Natchitoches mayor Joe 
Sampite was the keynote 
speaker at the Society for 
the Advancement of 
Management's first meeting 
this semester. 

At the Sept. 27 meeting, 
Sampite spoke about "five 
essentials of management 
that have helped him in the 
past and present," said 
Craig Hoosier, vice- 
president of promotion. 
"He explained the value of 
making plans and setting 
priorities. I especially liked 
his philosophy about 
remembering 'we' instead 
of "I" when working 
together." 

Hoosier said that SAM 
will be having many more 
speakers like Sampite at 
future meetings. According 
to him, there are ap- 
proximately 30 members of 
the organization. 

Officers are Ed Milem, 
president; Mark Birch, 
Craig Hoosier, and Tom 
Goss, vice-presidents; 
Lyndra Bethea, secretary; 
and Karen Richardson, 
treasurer. 

The next meeting will be 
Oct. 25 in Union 240. 



o 
6 



CURRENT SAUCE 
Oct. 16, 1984 
Vol. 73, No. 9 



i-eaiures 
Features 



'Cuckoo's Nest' Ends Five-day Run Tonight 



Tuesday night marks the 
final performance of the well- 
known play One Flew Over the 
Cuckoo's Nest, by Dale 
Wasserman, based on the 
novel by Ken Kesery. The 
setting is a state mental 
hospital in the Pacific Nor- 
thwest. 

Performing the leading 
caracters of the play are Britt 
Solano as the hardheartd 
McMurphy, Robert Guy as the 
mute Chief Bromden, and Dr. 
Gail Lewis as a very complex 
Nurse Patched. 

Solano, a second semester 
sophomore from Riverview, 
Fla., stars as McMurphy. He is 
a Theatre Arts major and used 
to model professionally. Past 
roles include Pap in Huck and 
Jim, and Mortemer in Arsenic 
and Old Lace. He has also 
starred in several high school 
plays. 

Solano feels his role as 
McMurphy is a challenging 
role. He admitted, "This is a 
difficult role for me because of 
the split level of personality. 



McMurphy goes through a lot 
of emotional changes." Solano 
characterizes McMurphy as a 
very strong person who is 
hard on the outside, but soft 
on the inside. He explained, 
"There is a lot of hustling and 
conning going on, but he has 
guts. He tries to bring more life 
into these people." 

One of the many lives' 
touched by McMurphy is 
Chief Bromide, played by 
Robert Guy, From Anacoco, 
Guy is a transfer student from 
L.S.U. He is in charge of the 
costume dept. at the A. A. 
Fredericks Center. He also 
works on the Potpourri 
yearbook. He has toured the 
Shakespeare Company of 
Baton Rouge. Robert was a 
theatre staff member. 

Chief Bromide, the oldest 
patient in the ward, has lost his 
Indian heritage and its mute. 
Through McMurphy, he sees 
his father, and begins to 
communicate. 

Guy said his role as Chief 
Bromide is difficult, because 



he has to narrate the play with 
a lower vocal range. Laughing, 
he exclaimed, "It's the first 
time I've had to shut up for an 
hour and a half." 

The head nurse who takes 
all the day-to-day "bull" of the 
patients is Nurse Ratched, 
played by Dr. Gail Lewis, head 
of the Creative and Performing 
Arts at Louisiana School. 
Lewis just moved to Nat- 
chtioches this past August. 

Twenty-five years of her life 
have been spent in acting; she 
has performed in Macbeth, 
Place in the Attic, Wait until 
Dark, and Follies, among 
others. 

Lewis stated, "This is one of 
my most challenging roles. 
Nurse Ratched is a very 
complex person. But, there 
are reasons for the anger and 
humane treatment." She is 
convinced that the nurse is 
genuinely honest in her 
reactions. She also believes 
Ratched demonstrates how 
easy it is to kill the "creative 
spark" in human beings. 




Cuckoo's Nest 

Dr. Spivey, played by Stephen Speights, discusses various 
entries in the log book with Nurse Ftynn, portrayed by 
Melanie Lea, in a scene from One Flew Over the Cuckoo's 
Nest. 




N.S.U. DOG BUSTER SPECIALS 
Free T shirts 

Your name is entered each time you buy a pizza. 
Ten drawings a day. 



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PIZZA 

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WE ATMi NUMBER 1 




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BFtK get 2 Free Cokes. 






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one item Pizza only $4.00. il-H 

Wednesday - Ladies Night- All ladies receive two dollars off any 
/7*"H large Pizza and SI. 00 off any small. 

Thursday night - Write your favorite La Tech Joke and get two free 
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Friday - Mr. Who? Special 

/4th Just tell us you made the switch to Domino's Pizza and get 
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Sunday - Large for the price of a small 6 p.m. - 12 p.m. 



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have the best pizza, employees and company. 

ThankJ Natchitoches for making us #1 in town. 




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News 



CURRENT SAUCE 
Oct. 16, 1984 
Vol. 73, No. 9 



7 

7 

2. 



University plans 
To honor military 



The University is continuing 
its 100 year celebration by 
honoring all military ser- 
vicemen and their families by 
dedicating October 27, as 
Military Day on their main 
campus in Natchitoches. 

Servicemen from all 
branches are invited to attend 
the many activities planned for 
that Saturday afternoon. 
Special events start at 3 p.m. 
with the Demon Dynamite 
Taiigating Party in the 
Coliseum parking lot where 
there will be a live band and 
military displays. At 4 p.m. the 
NSU Rangers will be giving a 



rapelling demonstration off the 
football stadium by the main 
ticket booths. 

The Demons take on Sam 
Houston at 7 p.m. 

For admission, servicemen 
and families need only to show 
their I.D. Cards. Active duty 
service persons are asked to 
wear their Class "B" Uniforms. 
Special features will be the 
ceremonial team from England 
AFB to post the Colors, the 
5th Infantry Division Band, the 
NSU Band, and the ROTC 
Black Knights, a precision drill 
team that will perform at half- 
time. 





Jaws IV 

The cheerleaders created yet another version of "Jaws" at Thursday's rain-soaked 
game in Turpin Stadium. Mark Colomb and Jimmy Chilton, right, are the shark, while 
Scott Repp and the girls are trying to get away. 



In celebration of the annual State Fair Game, Sandefur Shoes is offering 
NSU Students 20% Off the entire shoe inventory! 



LADIES SHOES & BOOTS 



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o 
8 

Q_ 



CURRENT SAUCE 
Oct. 16, 1984 
Vol. 73, No. 9 



News 
News 



Professor writes of Louisiana Baptist pioneer 



History professor Dr. William 
Allen Poe has written a new 
study, Green W. Hartsfield: A 
Biography, 1833-1896, 
which adds considerable 
detail to the religious, social, 
and educational history of 
North Louisiana in the 19th 
Century. 

The 228-page book, in- 
cluding the preface by Wayne 
Flynt of Auburn and a 
biographical note by Poe, was 
published by the NSU Press 
and sells for $22.50 in hard- 
back cover. 

According to Poe, Hartsfield 
journeyed with his parents 
down the Mississippi River 
from Tennessee and up the 
Red River to settle in Caddo 
Parish in 1849. His father did 
not prosper and lost his 1 60- 



acre farm at Spring Ridge in t 
parish sheriff's sale in 1 856. 

During the Civil War, Hart- 
sfield studied for the ministry 
at Mt. Lebanon College in 
Bienville Parish under William 
Carey Crane. His careful 
diary, on which the biography 
draws heavily, gives a 
fascinating account of the all- 
day journey by stagecoach 
from Shreveport to the small 
college town. 

Hartsfield's career spanned 
most of the remaining years of 
the century until his death in 
1896. During this era he was 
an "indefatigable" traveler 
throughout North Louisiana 
and beyond. 

He was one of only three 
Louisianians to attend a 
meeting of the Southern 
Baptist Convention during the 






Author Author 

Dr. William Poe (right) autographs a copy of his new book, 
Green W. Hartsfield: A Biography, 1833-1896, for president 
Dr. Joseph J. Orze. 




entire Civil War years. To 
accomplish this, he left 
Monroe on a railway flat car 
loaded with Confederate 
troops. 

Hartsfield's diaries reflect 
the social life of North 
Louisiana to a degree rarely 
paralleled in other sources. He 
slept and ate in hundreds of 



homes, performed scores of 
weddings and funerals, and 
was held in great esteem by 
rich and poor alike. 

His life was bound up more 
intimately with the Louisiana 
Baptist Convention than 
perhaps that of any other 
person in that century. He 



gatherings by horseback 
wagon, and by the first trains 
which reached the region. He 
had extremely close relations 
with both Keatchie (DeSotcj 
Parish) and Mt. Lebanor 
colleges. The internal disputes 
which weakened both pioneer 
institutions are discussed ir 



journeyed to religious the book. 



Ener 



A Pre-requisite on Every Job Resume. 




What does it take to get 
a good job these days? A good education is a 
necessity. Experience certainly helps. Intel- 
ligence. A willingness to learn. Ambition to 
get to the top. The ability to get along with 
people. And energy, because without energy 
there just wouldn't be any jobs to fill. In order 
to supply that energy, electric companies must 
take advantage of the most up-to-date tech- 
nology, build facilities as efficient as possible 
and make full use of every available energy 
source including nuclear power and coal. 
Energy. You need it to get a job. 



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STATE FAIR WEEK 




NSU Demons Are... 

DOGBUSTERS 




Tuesday, October 1 6 



ALL DAY - Demon Scavenger Hunt 

Each sorority, fraternity, organization, and dormitory floor may compete. Demon run 
around lists must be picked up and signed out between 7:00 and 7:50 am on Tuesday. All 
items located must be boxed, numbered, and in the Ballroom by 8 pm Tuesday night. The 
trivia answers must be listed on a piece of looseleaf college ruled paper with NO scratch 
outs and be completed in ink. The person who signed out the list that morning must sign 
the bottom of the trivia answer list. In case of a tie a sealed envelope containing a trivia 
question will be asked of each team. First to answer wins. In the event of another tie a 
coin will be flipped. Minimum of 10 people to a team. Several organizations or floors may 
merge to form a team. Please turn in a roster to the SGA office on or before Tuesday at 8 
am. 



Wednesday, October 1 7 



SGA Football Game 
Northwestern vs. Louisiana Tech 
7pm - Tech practice field, Ruston 
"SGA Grudge Match" 



State Fair Downs 

7:30 pm - Union Ballroom 

Horse races, casino games, and refreshments 



State Fair Tailgate Party 

On the west side of Turpin Stadium. From 3-5, Earth will be 
playing. There will be a repelling show at 3:30. Beverages 
will be available. Free giveaways. 



NSU Mixer/Find the Bulldog 

At the Student Body Club on the Bypass. Clues will be given each half hour starting at 
10:30. Cash prize for winner. FREE ADMISSION 



D J-Marvin Williams (Jabber Jaws) 
8-1 2 pm 
Union Ballroom 



Thursday, October 18 

State Fair Supper - 5-6 

with entertainment in front of Iberville Dining Hall. 

The Burning of the Bulldog, presentation of court, and pep rally will follow. 



Friday, October 1 9 

Pep Rally - 6 pm 

LeBossier Hotel, Shreveport 

Football team will be introduced, and it will be televised by 
local news stations. If you need directions, call 357-4501 or 
357-5286. 



Saturday, October 20 



Rally in the Alley -1 pm 

In Shreve Square. The presentation of the NSU State Fair Court will be at 1 :00. In the 
square there will be many activities and events all afternoon. 

Presentation of courts - 6:30 
Independence Stadium 

Northwestern State University vs. Louisiana Tech University - 7 pm 
The oldest grudge match In north Louisiana 



Monday, October 22 

No classes all day - after we win! 



STATE FAIR T-SHIRTS 
Long Sleeve 

$8.00 a piece - Limited Supply 



bporis 
Sports 



CURRENT SAUCE 



TU 



1 

JJQl 



Vol. 73, No. 9 



Demons drown Colonel GSC hopes 

Northwestern Wins Battle of NSU's, 19-0 



"This was the best game 
I've seen a team play." 

Coach Sam Goodwin's 
comments said it all following 
Thursday's 19-0 shutout win 
in the battle of the NSU's - 
Northwestern vs. Nicholls. 
With the win, Northwestern 
took sole possession of first 
place in the Gulf Star Con- 
ference. 

It was also the first Demon 
shutout since 1 977. 

"We executed even better 
than we did last week (a 28-7 
win over SW Texas)," said 
Goodwin. "The kicking game 
was excellent, and there's 
little you can say about the 
defense that would really 
explain the job they did out 
there tonight." 

The kickoff was delayed 30 
minutes due to rain. Demon 
offensive production was also 
delayed when the game 
started, but just for two 
possessions. The third time 
around was much better. 

With 2:49 left in the first 
period, Benny Brouillette's 
42-yard field goal put Nor- 
thwestern up, 3-0. The 
Demons set up the field goal 
on runs by Mike Walker and 
Ron Haggerty. 

Nicholls did nothing when 
they got the ball back, and the 
Demons took over to start the 
second period. An eight- 
minute drive that took most of 
the quarter ended with 
Brouillette booting another 
field goal, this one a school- 
record 52 yards. Nor- 
thwestern led, 6-0. 

Brouillette boomed the 
kickoff deep into the endzone, 
and the Colonels started from 
their own 20. Nicholls could 



get nothing against the 
nationally-ranked Nor- 
thwestern defense, and were 
forced to punt. 

The Demons started another 
drive at their own 43. Odessa 
Turner's short run picked up 
seven yards, while fellow back 
Chris Chenier went up the 
middle for 1 5 on the next play. 

On the next play, quar- 
terback Wayne Van hit Turner 
with a pass at the Nicholls 1 5. 
Turner turned on the speed, 
and Northwestern's lead was 
increased to 1 3-0. 

Late in the first half, the 
Colonels drove to the Nor- 
thwestern eight-yard line, 
where Michael Richardson 
stripped Nicholls' Lionel Vital 
of the ball. Northwestern sat 
on it, and went into the 
lockerroom leading fellow 
GSC-leader Nicholls by 1 3. 

An uneventful third quarter 
followed. The only threat by 
the Demons was a Ernest 
Crittenden interception of a 
Keith Menard pass at the 
Colonel 24. However, 
Nicholls intercepted the ball in 
the end zone and ended the 
Demon drive. 

The game's final points 
came in the final period, when 
a Colonel option was 
mishandled. The Demons 
recoved at the Nicholls 10- 
yard line. A procedure penalty 
against the visitors from 
Thibodaux followed, and 
freshman John Stephens 
bulled in for a five-yard TD. 
Brouillette added the extra 
point, giving (our) NSU their 
1 9-0 margin of victory. 




Ouch! 

Defensive Tackle Leon Carr blocks - literally - a Nicholls State punt during Thursday's 
game. Northwestern took over sole possession of first place in the Gulf Star with the win. 




12 



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For All Times 




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Scoreboard 



LSU 34, Vanderbilt 27 

The 4-0-1 Tigers almost let this one get away after leading 
34-6 in the fourth quarter. 

Louisiana Tech 20, Arkansas State 1 

The Techsters strengthened their grip on the Southland 
Conference by downing ASU in Ruston. 

Tulane 35, Southern Mississippi 7 

Let's hope USM plays NSU like they did Tulane: the Eagles 
couldn't get it going. 

Northeast 30, Southeastern 1 5 

NLU recorded its fifth win to just one loss (NSU) by downing 
the 1 -5 Lions in Monroe. 

McNeese State 2$, North Texas State 7 

The 10th-ranked Cowboys are now 5-1 after their thrashing 
of the 1 -6 Eagles in Denton. 




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Northwestern (4-2) at Louisiana Tech (4-3) 



Mascot: Demons 
Enrollment: 6,178 

Colors: Purple, white, and orange 
Location: Natchitoches, LA 
Founded: 1884 
Conference: Gulf Star 
Affiliation: NCAA Div. I-AA 
1983 record: 4-7 




Mascot: Bulldogs 
Enrollment: 11,156 
Colors: Red and blue 
Location: Ruston, LA 
Founded: 1894 
Conference: Southland 
Affiliation: NCAA Div. I-AA 
1983 record: 4-7 



Saturday night, 7 p.m., Independence Stadium, Shreveport 



Cross Country looks for GSC title 



Squad Returns Three 



Cross country coach Leon 
Johnson welcomes back three 
letterwinners from last year's 
squad as the Demons track 
their footprints towards a 
possible Gulf Star conference 
championship in 1 984. To get 
there, the Demon harriers will 




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have to clear a couple of tree 
stumps in the form of Stephen 
F. Austin and Southwest 
Texas State. 

Johnson, now in his third 
year as coach, isn't overly 
enthusiastic about his teams 
endurance work, but expects 
that it will get better as the 
season progresses. "Right 
now, our team is composed of 
a lot of middle distance 
runners. We'll be good in the 
short three and four mile 
races, but the longer 
distances will give us trouble. 
We are training to be com- 
petitive, especially by the 
conference meet (to be held 
Saturday, November 3rd in 
Nacogdoches, Texas)." 

The Demon troops have 
been thinned considerably. 
Ricky Fuller, last years best 
freshman runner and a good 
bet to be 1984's top gun, 
dropped out of school. Junior 
Chris Maggio is the most 
experienced Demon runner 




with two letters under his belt. 
Only other returning let- 
terwinners are sophormores 
Russell Duty and Dean 
Johnson. 

Johnson is not discouraged 
at this point and in fact says 
that he has been "impressed 
by our young runners. They 
are somewhat inexperienced, 
but three or four of them are 
really close together in terms 
of competition. I'm hoping that 
one of them breaks away from 
the pack." 

If someone is to break away, 
they'll have to do it against a 
formidable set of opponents, 
as this year's schedule is 
loaded with some cross 
country heavyweights. "Our 
first three meets are tough, 
and our own invitational 
(October 15) will have Mc- 
Neese, USL and Stephen F. 
Austin participating. As for 
right now we need more 
training time to get prepared 
for the conference meet." 



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Lake Turpin 



Northwestern football players needed galoshes instead of 
cleats during last week's NSU-Nicholls game in Turpin 
Stadium. Three to five inches of water covered some parts of 
the turf. 



Demons Face Two 
Holiday Tourneys 



Northwestern's basketball 
team will compete in two 
holiday tournaments this 
season, and in both cases the 
Demons will be playing in the 
opening game of the tourney. 

Northwestern will play in the 
NLU Pacemaker Classic for 
the second straight year, with 
that event scheduled this year 
for December 5-6 in Monroe. 
The Demons will meet the host 
Indians in the first round on 
Wednesday night at 6:30, 
with a match between Cen- 
tenary and Southern to follow 
at 8:30. 

The first night losers will 
meet at 6:30 in the con- 
solation on Thursday evening, 
while the championship 
contest will be played at 8:30. 

Northwestern later in the 
month will take part in the 



Southwestern Budweiser 
Bayou Classic, that tour- 
nament being held Friday and 
Saturday, December 14-15 in 
Blackham Coliseum in 
Lafayette. ° 

In the first round of that 
tournament the Demons will 
face SLU in a 6:00 contest, 
while Southwestern will host 
Drexel University at 8:15. 
Again the first night losers and 
winners will meet on Saturday 
night. 

Last season the Demons 
participated in just one 
tournament, placing fourth in 
the Pacemaker Classic at 
Northeast. Along with the 
tournament match-ups, the 
Demons will also meet Nor- 
theast, Southern, Centenary 
and Southeastern on a home- 
and-home basis during the 
season. 



TZ 
12 

1 o 



CURRENT SAUCE 
Oct. 16, 1984 
Vol. 73, No. 9 



viewpoint 

Viewpoint 



The Time Is Now 



In honor of this week's (and maybe this year's) 
biggest event comes Demon Dictionary word number 

six: 

State Fair - the social event of the season. 
Highlighted by slightly inebriated Demon fans, 
obnoxious Techsters (dressed in plaid shorts, of 
course), expensive prices, and the only football 
game that matters. 

In the past, State Fair has been a traumatic ex- 
perience for many Demon supporters. For instance, 
Tech would enter the game 5-1, with NSU 2-4. 
Tech's 200-person band could be heard around 
Shreveport, while people sitting next to our band 
couldn't hear them. Their nationally-ranked 
cheerleaders were great, ours were good. The Tech 
side was packed, while ours... 

That all changes this year. 

The Demons enter the Classic with a better record 
than the Bulldogs. It'll be a battle between con- 
ference leaders. And it should be good. 

Our band is up-and-coming. Tech's band will be 
slightly surprised this weekend. 

Our cheerleaders are good, too. Good enough to 
compete with any school in our size range. 

The last part - the packed stands - depends on us. 
This year, make it a point to be at the State Fair game. 
Spirited fans can really be the "12th man" on the 
football team. 

If going to the fair, the following essentials may be 
good to bring along: money (to keep your date 
happy, buy momentos for Junior back home, and pay 
for possible bail), Jack Daniels (for snake bites, of 
course), track shoes (for the hike from your parking 
space to the fair), and of course, more money! 

State Fair Week began yesterday with the bed 
races and air band contest. Activities continue 
throughout the week. Organizers of these events 
have spent a lot of time and money, so get out and 
have some fun this week. 

And needless to say, Demon fans everywhere will 
have fun this weekend. I know that this has been said 
for years, but: 

This is our year! 



by John Ramsey 



Editor 




^ NORTHWESTERN xr 

Celebration of a centuri 



1884-1984 
>.< 




® 




Letter to the Editor 



Dear Editor 

Just wanted to make a couple of observations about this year 
and let you know how proud I am to be a part of Northwestern. 

First, the improvement in your newspaper, and especially the 
increased coverage of the athletic programs has been 
tremendous. I know you have a tough job, and I want to thank 
you for a job well done and wish you continued success. 

I, also, would like to recognize the tremendous impact Bill 
Brent, his staff, and the NSU Band has made on the image of 
Northwestern and on school spirit. I've never witnessed such a 
dramatic turn around in a program. They not only look and 
sound good when they perform, but they are also such en- 
thusiastic supporters of the team. We full they have been in- 
strumental (excuse the pun) in the team's success this year. 

We at Northwestern have a lot going for us right now and I 
hope all of our students, faculty, and staff feel as much a part of 
our football team as we feel a part of you. 

Sam Goodwin 
Head Football Coach 



Classified Ads 
Are Coming! 



Beginning in two weeks, Current Sauce will begin ac- 
cepting classified ads in the following categories: help 
wanted, for sale, services, want to buy, personals, and misc. 

There is no length limit, but all ads must be in good taste. 
The cost is .00 for students and staff. ..you got it.. .they're 
free! 

Just drop them off in the Sauce box at 225A Kyser Hall. Be 
sure to leave a phone number where you can be reached. 

P.S. - please specify how long the ad is to run. There is, 
however, a maximum run of two weeks without a renewal in 
writing. 



Current 
Sauce 
Staff 



John Ramsey 
Editor 

Lisa Williams 
Managing Editor 

Stacy Scroggins 
Business Manager 

Lucy LeBlanc 
Darlene Winslow 
Advertising 

Kim Nolde 
Sports Editor 

Robin J. Gunter 
News Editor 

Scott Cox 
Gena Williams 
News Staff 

Russel Bienvenu 
Circulation 

Bryan Williams 
Layout 

Kevin Hopkins 
Photographers 

Peter Minder 
Adviser 

Current Sauce I* 
published weekly by 
students of Northwestern 
State University of 
Louisiana. It is student- 
run and financed, and is 
not associated with any of 
the University's college 5 
or departments. Staff 
members are selected by 
the Editor, with the ap- 
proval of the Student 
Media Board. 

Editorial and business 
offices are located s' 
Kyser Hall 225A. Office 
hours are 1-4 p." 1 - 
Tuesday through Friday; 
The telephone number is 
(318) 357-5456. 

All correspondent 
should be brought by the 
office or mailed to 
Box 5306, NSU, Nat- 
chitoches, LA 71497 
Deadline for both ad- 
vertising and copy is 1 
p.m. on the Thursday 
preceding Tuesday 
publication. The su* 
scription rate is $6.00 P* 
semester. 

Current Sauce is 
tered as second cla sS 
mail in Natchitoches, 
USPS number 140-660. 



s 

(0 



s 
s 



Caldwell project approved by State 



NORTHWESTERN 
STATE 
UNIVERSITY 

Oct. 23, 1984 
Vol. 73, No. 10 




Midterm 
Break 

Current Sauce will not 
be published next week, 
s "»ce the staff will be 
taking a little much- 
needed rest and recovery. 
The Sauce will return on 
November 6, just in time 
f °r the 1984 presidential 
Action. 



The rebuilding of Caldwell 
Hall and the renovation of the 
elementary lab school 
highlight the state capital 
outlay projects awarded to 
NSU for the 1984-85 fiscal 
year. 

Although the money is 
coming from the insurance 
company and not the state, 
the Caldwell Hall project still 
went through the capital outlay 
process. According to Loran 
Lindsey, the insurance 
company settled for "almost 4 
million dollars." 

When rebuilt, Caldwell will 
be used as an administration 



building. "Students can go to 
all offices in one building," 
said Lindsey. "Financial Aid, 
Admission, counselors - and if 
they're still not happy, they 
can go see the President in 
the same building," he laughs. 
The original doorways left 
standing by the 1 982 fire will 
be used in the new building. 

Caldwell will require some 8- 
10 months planning. Bids for 
architects will go out soon, 
said Lindsey. 

The state also approved the 
renovation of Warren Easton 

lab school, the nursery-grade 
5 school near Chaplin's Lake. 



Easton is one of the oldest 
facilities on campus, and will 
cost $3.4 million for 
renovations. 

"It will be a total renovation," 
said Lindsey, "and we'll begin 
work in early summer." 

Northwestern recently 
awarded the contract for the 
final phase of an ongoing 
electrical distribution 
system. This final phase will 
replace many of the old 
steampipes (some since 
1 939) and street lights. 

"We'll replace all steel street 
lights with the concrete ones, 
like on Sibley Drive," said 
Lindsey. "This will make the 
dark areas of the campus safe, 




To rise from the ashes 

Reconstruction of Caldwell Hall, which was destroyed by fire in 1982, will be rebuilt with 
some $4 million dollars from NSU's insurance company. The blaze that destroyed the 
building is pictured in a file photo. 

Professor Nominated For Award 



Dr. Tommy G. Johnson, 
professor and coordinator of 
Northwestern 's Center for 
Computer Literacy, has been 
nominated for the John Gregg 
Award, the highest award that 
can be given nationally to a 
business educator. 

The award honors a pioneer 
business educator who was 
noted for the establishment of 
the Gregg Shorthand System 
in 1 890. It is co-sponsored by 
the National Business 
Education Association and the 
Gregg Award Committee. 

Johnson is one of ap- 
proximately 30 educators 
from across the nation who is 
being considered for the 
nominees will be honored at 
the NBEA Convention at Las 



Vegas, Nev., in April of 1 985. 

Johnson is being cited for 
his work in establishing the 
Center for Computer Literacy 
at Northwestern. He wrote the 
proposal which was accepted 
by NSU and approved by the 
State Board of Trustees for 
Colleges and Universities. The 
center was established as Act 
152 by the 1984 register 
session of Louisiana 
Legislature. 

Johnson has served as 
NSU's representative to the 
National Association of 
Business Teacher Education 
for 1 8 years. 

Johnson is a past-president 
of both the Louisiana Business 
Education Association and 
Louisiana Vocational 



Association. He served for 
nine years, from 1 973 to 
1982, as a member of the 
Southern Business Education 
Association's executive, 
board. 

In 1 973, he was honored as 
the Young Educator for 
Natchitoches Parish, Business 
Educator for the Year in 
Louisiana and the Vocational 
Educator for the Year in 
Louisiana. 

In 1981, Johnson was 
chosen by the NBEA to serve 
as the national program 
chairman for the association's 
convention in New Orleans, 
and in 1980 and 1982 he 
received meritorious service 
awards from the organization. 



and will make all the lights look 
alike. It'll also be efficient; half 
of our current lights are 
surrounded by tree bran- 
ches." 

The legislature also provided 
for two classroom buildings 
at NSU-Fort Polk. This will 
centralize all classes at one 
location, instead of being 
spread across the base. 

Also, the College of Nursing 
received 1.4 million dollars for 
the purchase of equipment 
for the new Line Avenue 
building in Shreveport. When 
the facility is complete, it will 
replace the ADOS building on 
Kings Highway, which is 
owned by LSU. 

"We'll use this money for 
nursing equipment and 
supplies," commented Lind- 
sey. "We've got to buy stuff 
for a large building; - it has 
some 88,000 square feet of 
space." He added that some 
compute equipment will be 
added, also. The Line Avenue 
campus will be totally func- 
tional by summer. 

Work is already underway 
on an air conditioner 
"chiller" at Iberville Dining 
Hall. The cost of the project is 
$53,000. 

For 1 985-86, Northwestern 
will propose the following 
projects to the Board of 
Regents for approval: 

Repair and construction of 
most campus buildings, 
especially residence halls, to 
meet Fire Marshall's 
requirements. 

Instructional equipment 
consisting of typewriters, 
computers, overhead 
projectors, etc. NSU is 
requesting $1.68 million 
dollars for this project. 

Purchase of a touch-tone 
telephone system for the 
campus at a cost of $1,359 
million. 

Renovation and equipment 
for the Computer Center. The 
Center will eventually move 
from Kyser to the building 
behind the Old Trade School. 

Fixing the air conditioning 
in Kyser Hall. The cost will be 
$351,000. Other projects to 
be requested by NSU, but put 
on a lower priority list or slated 
for later years, are: 
Renovation of the Intramural 
Building, built in 1939. This 
would cost $4. 1 28 million. 
Renovation and air con- 
ditioning of the Business 
Building at a cost of $1 .384 
million. 

A centralized maintenance 
center and warehouse, 

1.522 million dollars. 
An agriculture center 

valued at $2,387 million. 

Renovation of both 
Louisiana and Natchitoches 
dormitories. This project 
would cost $4,014 million if 
approved. 



News 
News 



"Z 
2 



CURRENT SAUCE 
Oct. 23,1984 
Vol.73, No. 10 



M 



NEWS 
BRIEFS 



STUDENT HANDBOOKS 
AVAILABLE 

The 1 984-85 student 
handbooks are now in. 
Students may pick up a 
copy in Union 214, the 
Student Activities Office. 



ALPHA PHI ALPHA 
ELECTS OFFICERS 

Alpha Phi Alpha has 
elected the following as 
1984-85 officers: Danny 
Edwards, president; 
Frederick Prothro, vice- 
president-secretary; Ron 
Cook, treasurer; Kevin 
Greenhouse, dean of 
pledges; Eric Willis, 
parlimentrian; and Eric 
Armstead, chaplain. 

New pledges are Alvin 
Graber Jr., Clifton Walker, 
John Raggio and Felton 
Payton. 



WESLEY ANNOUNCES 
ACTIVITIES 

Activities at the Wesley 
Foundation for this week 
include Sunday evening 
worship at 6 p.m., Wed- 
nesday Bible study at 6 
p.m., and the Thursday 
noon alternative (TNA). 
Cheryl McBride will speak 
on Thursday about sim- 
plistic lifestyles. 

In other Wesley hap- 
penings, director Barbara 
Duke gave birth to her first 
child on Oct. 9. 



KAPPA SIGMA 
INITIATES STARDUSTERS 

Kappa Sigma Fraternity 
held its Starduster initiation 
on Tuesday, according to 
Greg Powell, public 
relations chairman. Initiated 
were Susan Arthur, Stacy 
Brown, Cindy Ernst (dream 
girl), Ro Fiorentino, Rhonda 
Leydecker, Leah Sherman, 
and Amy Whitford. 

Rounding out the 
Stardusters are "old" 
members Mary Camden. 
Angela Lasyone, and 
Connie Leger. 

Ths Sigs held an ex- 
change with Sigma Kappa 
two weeks ago, and one 
with Sigma Sigma Sigma is 
set for Wednesday night. 



Several Companies 
Schedule Interviews 



Several national companies 
and local school boards will be 
on-campus this Week in- 
terviewing graduating 
students, said Danny 
Seymour, director of the 
placement office. 

On Tuesday, U.S. Fidelity 
and Guaranty Company will be 
at Northwestern. This firm is 
looking for accounting, 
business and general studies 
majors. Likewise, Pete, 
Marwick and Mitchell will be 
here on Tuesday, also looking 
for accounting majors. 

In addition, St. Martin Parish 
Schools is seeking all 
education majors. 

On Thursday, the Soil 



Conservation Service will be 
interviewing Agri-business, 
agronomy, forestry and soil 
science majors. The company 
is also looking for non- 
graduating students for 
summer programs. 

Also on Thursday, the 
Caddo Parish School System 
will be interviewing education 
majors. 

On Tuesday, Oct. 30, both 
J.C. Penney and IBM will be 
visiting the NSU campus. 
Penney's is looking for 
business, marketing and 
management students, while 
IBM seeks computer science 
and natural science (math, 
physics and chemistry) 
students. 



Watercolor Exhibit 
Now on display 



A large watercolor exhibition 
entitled "The New Mexico 
Experience" will be on display 
through Nov. 1 in the Hanchey 
Gallery of the A.A. Fredericks 
Center. 

The watercolor paintings 
included in the exhibit were 
created by Art Department 
chairman and professor Dr. 
Bill Bryant and 14 of his 
students who traveled to New 
Mexico last summer and 
painted on location at Tres 
Ritos, Taos, Ghost Ranch and 
Santa Fe. 

"The exhibit is mostly 
watercolors and basically 
landscapes," said Bryant. 
"The areas we visited in New 



Mexico were selected for the 
watercolor workshop because 
they are so different from what 
the students have ex- 
perienced here. The areas 
lend themselves to watercolor 
painting." 

Students whose works are 
being exhibited in "The New 
Mexico Experience" include 
Wanda Burns, Edwin Carter, 
Kathleen Eversull, Audrey 
Hammill, Faye Killen, Betty 
Norman and Kellie Raschal of 
Alexandria; Tommie Cooper, 
Winnfield; Gertrude Jacobs, 
Slagle, and Mina McKaskle, 
Sally Paschall, Tom Roberts 
and Eleanor Wynne, Nat- 
chitoches. 



Officers selected 
for Sociology group 



Periaktoi, a campus 
organization founded for 
undergraduate students who 
are majoring in sociology, 
social work, or law en- 
forcement, recently elected 
the following officers: Renee 
Barton, president; Dexter 
Anderson, vice-president, 
Reginald Horton, secretary- 
treasurer; and Doris Niette, 
sergeant-arms. 

According to Randy 
Hoffpaiur, a member of the 
organization, Periaktoi "not 
only aids students in their 
scholarly pursuits but also is a 
working organization and has 
on several occasions hosted 
community action programs 



sucn as food drives for the 
needy." 

Periaktoi is sponsoring 
musician Bill Oliver, an en- 
vironmental activist and 
songwriter, in Union Station 
on Tuesday, October 23 at 8 
p.m. Hot dogs, soft drinks, 
and beer will be sold at the 
performance. 

Hoffpaiur said the group's 
next meeting will be Monday 
at 1 p.m. in Kyser Hall 333. 



PROFESSIONAL RESUMES 

Two Page Resumes 
. Each An Original . 
▼ 20 For $30.00 ♦ 
357-0727 




Practice Makes Perfect 

Brenda Goldman and Yvette Jordan practice their Cane 
River Belles routine in the Health and P.E. Majors Building. 
The Belles will perform in the last home game this season on 
Saturday. 




RESEARCH PAPERS 



14.789 to choose from — all subjects' 
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News 
News 



CURRENT SAUCE 
Oct. 23,1984 
Vol. 73, No. 10 



v3 

3 



The Future of Education 



DeSoto school head to speak at conference 



DeSoto Parish Superin- 
tendent of Schools Dr. David 
E. Lee of Mansfield will serve 
as a panelist during the 
Saturday morning session of 
"The Future of Education" 
Conference Nov. 9-10 at 
Northwestern. 

Lee will be responding at 1 1 
a.m. in the Fine Arts 



Cards 
Needed 



Several organizations must 
turn in organizational cards' 
immediately or be deleted 
from the roles, said Camille 
Hawthorne, director of 
student activities. 

Cards are needed from 
Alpha Angels, NACUS, Chess 
Club, Chi Alpha, College 
Republicans, DPMA, Delta 
Zeta, FCS, Microbiology- 
Biochemistry, Muslim Student 
Association, NAACP and 
Omega Psi Phi. 

Also, Panhellenic, Pan 
Hellenic, Periaktoi, Phi Delta 
Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Mu 
Alpha Sinfonia, Pi Omega Pi, 
Rho Lambda, Sigma Alpha 
lota, Sigma Tau Delta, Sigma 
Theta Tau, Student Am- 
bassadors, University of Yang, 
University Players and Young 
Democrats of Louisiana. 



Auditorium to formal papers 
presented by nationally- 
assistant superintendent of 
schools and as a visiting 
professor and lecturer for 
several colleges and 
universities. 

He is a member of the 
National Speakers Association 
and has been a featured 
speaker and conducted 
educational seminars in some 
44 states, the Bahama 
Islands, Canada, Nova Scotia 
and Mexico. 

"The Future of Education" 
Conference, which begins 
Friday and Saturday with 
registration at 8 a.m. and the 
first presentation each day at 
9 a.m., is being funded by 
grants from the Louisiana 
State Department of 
Education, the Louisiana 
Committee for the Humanities 
and various NSU 
organizations. The general 
public is invited to attend, and 
there is no admission charge. 

Project co-director Dr. 
Maxine Taylor, professor of 
history and chairman of the 
Department of History, Social 
Sciences and Social Work, 
said the two-day conference 
will bring together prominent 
national and state scholars and 
policy makers to explore a 
variety of issues dealing with 
the entire spectrum of 



education problems currently 
confronting parents and 

acclaimed educator and 
author Dr. John L. Goodlad, 
professor of education at the 
UCLA Graduate School of 
Education and visiting 
professor of education at the 

University of Washington, and 
Dr. Karolyn J. Snyder, 
associate professor of 
education at the University of 
South Florida. 

Other panelists will be 
Goodlad; Dr. Snyder; Ronald 
Gross, director of the In- 
dependent Scholarship 
Project in Great Nick, N.Y., 
and Rep. Jimmy Long of 
Natchitoches, chairman of the 
House Education Committee. 

Lee, who earned his 
doctoral degree in school 
administration from LSU, is the 
author of a book entitled "The 
Motivating Administrator." His 
extensive professional ex- 
perience includes serving as a 
classroom teacher, coach, 
secondary school principal, 

school-age children. 

For further information, call 
357-6187 or 357-6195, or 
write "The Future of 
Education" Conference, 
College of Education and 
Behavioral Sciences, Nor- 
thwestern State University, 
Natchitoches, La. 71497. 



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Who is Mr. and Miss NSU? 




Russel Bienvenu 



Ron Cook 




Darlene Brown 



Find out Saturday at 
the NSU-Sam Houston game 



YOUR FM ALTERNATIVE.. ..91 .7 



& TUESDAY 



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MARY TURNERS OFF THE RECORD 1 hour with 
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News 

News 



4 

A 



CURRENT SAUCE 
Oct. 23,1984 
Vol.73, No. 10 



SU Dean To Speak At NSU Conference 



The future of minorities in 
higher education will be ex- 
plored by Dr. Jewel Limar 
Prestage of Baton Rouge 
when she speaks at "The 
Future of Education" Con- 
ference, which will be con- 
ducted Friday and Saturday, 
Nov. 9-10, at Northwestern. 

Dean of the School of Public 
Policy and Urban Affairs at 
Southern University, Dr. 
Prestage will lecture on blacks 
in American higher education 
at 1 :30 p.m. Friday in the Fine 
Arts Auditorium of the A.A. 
Fredericks Creative and 
Performing Arts Center at 
Northwestern. 

"The Future of Education" 
Conference, which is open to 
the public without admission 
charge, will explore issues of 
K-12 and higher education, 
the role of the humanities in 
education, the computer 
revolution and learning, and 
the challenges and changes 
facing education as en- 
visioned by leading national 
and state authorities in 
education. 

A recent recipient of a 



special award from the 
American Political Science 
Association, Dr. Prestage is 
the first black woman to earn 
the Ph.D. degree in political 
science from the University of 
Iowa and is one of 57 
distinguished state women 
honored in the Women's 
Pavilion at the Louisiana World 
Exposition in New Orleans. 

The well-known scholar and 
eductor firmly believes that 
black are under-represented 
on college and university 
faculties, in graduate 
programs and in graduating 
classes. 

"I want to look at the 
question of access at all those 
levels and to ask what kinds of 
corrective action would yield 
positive results," said 
Prestage, who has presented 
papers on political science in 
black colleges, on black 
women in the legislature, on 
women in higher education 
and on the political 
socialization of blacks. 

In a recent University of 



STUDENJ) 



Wednesday: 

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plus more Trivial Pursuit 




Thursday: 

Kill Those 'Kats! 



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CELEBRATE THE DEMON WIN 
OVER SAM HOUSTON STA TEl 



New Orleans freshman class, 
Dr. Prestage stated, there 
were 1 ,245 black freshmen, 
of whom only 315 survived to 
enter the sophomore year. 
"An attrition rate of more than 
75 percent at an urban 
university shows we have 
some problems," she stated. 
The attrition rate at Southern 



University, where Dr. 
Prestage has taught since 
1956, is "more in line with 
those of other state univer- 
sities." 

Dr. Prestage is serving on a 
national panel studying black 
voting patterns in presidential 
elections. She said the panel 
will produce the first in-depth 



study of the voting behavior of 
blacks. 

In the future the Southern 
University dean would like to 
write a book on the black 
woman in American politics 
and also a study of the 
development of political 
science as an academic 
discipline in black colleges. 



d^d ^ 



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|Nt?WS 

News 



CURRENT SAUCE 
Oct. 23,1984 
Vol.73, No. 10 



T3~ 

5 



Oliver Set To 
Perform Tuesday 



Environmental songwriter 
and singer Bill Oliver will 
appear in concert on Tuesday 
in Union Station at 8 p.m. 

Oliver's performance is 
being sponsored by Periaktoi, 
campus organization for 
students majoring in 
sociology, social work, or law 
enforcement. 

Raised in several states, 
Oliver began learning guitar 
and writing songs in grade 
school. He was a member of 
several rock bands during 
junior and senior high. 

Oliver attended the 
University of Texas at 
Arlington from 1966-68, and 
worked while in school as a TV 
camera operator in Dallas. 
During this time he switched to 
acoustic guitar and harmonica, 
performing solo and in small 
folk groups. 



The next two years were 
spent in the U.S. Army with a 
trip to South Vietnam. Oliver 
fromed a small folk group and 
made both official and 
unofficial playing trips to 
villages, bases, hospital ships, 
and USO clubs. 

Between 1970 and 1974, 
Oliver lived in Seattle, 
Phoenix, Cincinatti and 
Maryland, doing lots of hit- 
chhiking and driving. His 
songs reflect his impressions 
of western mountains and 
deserts, Puget Sound, the 
Ohio River valley and 
Chesapeake Bay. 

Since 1974, Austin has 
been his home base. His 
interest in environmental and 
social causes has emerged 
through his music, producing 
material for specific and 
general issues, as well as 
personal ballads. 




Performing Tonight 



Environmentalist Bill Oliver will perform tonight in Union 
Station. NSU students will be admitted free. 



Pickett Promoting Recreation In Orlando 



Betty Pickett of Nor- 
thwestern will be in Orlando, 
Ra , Oct. 21-24 to promote 
NSU's undergraduate and 
Graduate degree programs in 
jnunicipal. outdoor and 
"terapeutic recreation at the 
Jtoual Congress of the 
National Recreation and Parks 
Assoication. 
Pickett was appointed 
s summer to serve as 
coordinator of recreation and 
*sistant professor for the 
Apartment of Health, 



Physical Education and 
Recreation. 

According to Pickett, 
Northwestern offers Bachelor 
of Science and Mastor of 
Science degrees in 
recreation. The undergraduate 
degree provides con- 
centration in either municipal, 
outdoor or therapeutic 
recreation, and the master's 
degree provides an in- 
terdisciplinary program that 
offers a concentration in 
recreation. 



For the undergraduate, 
municipal recreation is 
designed for students in- 
terested in public and private 
recreation provided by 
municipalities and agencies. 
Outdoor recreation is for 
individuals interested in 
recreational activities which 
occur in a natural environment 
and which relate directly to the 
outdoor environment. 
Therapeutic recreation covers 
the specific use of 
recreational activities in the 



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care, treatment and 
rehabilitation of ill, han- 
dicapped and aged persons in 
a directed program. 

"An adventure-expedition 
progam is offered to provide 
leadership and training op- 
portunities in adventure ac- 
tivities, especially in outdoor 
recreation pursuits," said 
Pickett. 

Technique courses included 
in the adventure-expedition 
program for the undergraduate 
are adventure skills, survival, 
backpacking, hunting and 
hunter safety, cycle touring, 
rock climbing, Whitewater 
boating, winter camping and 
cross-country skiing. 




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SGA SPONSORS 
ROOMMATE TATTLETALES 

Participants in the 
roommate tattletales on 
Monday, Oct. 15, were 
Lisa and Mignona Cote; 
Daniel and Perry Anderson, 
Reatha Cole and Eileen 
Haynes; and Paula Sim- 
mons and Abbie White. 
Cole and Haynes were the 
winners. 

Servers at the midnight 
breakfast were Dr. Orze, 
Dean Bosarge, Archie 
Anderson, Camille 
Hawthorne and Linda 
Nicholas. SGA members 
were served steak and 
champagne after the 
breakfast. 

Tech cruised past the 
NSU SGA in the football 
game in Ruston. Tech 
triumphed, 33-24. A party 
was held after the game. 

FLIGHT TEAM 
TO ATTEND MEET 

NSU's flight team will be 
attending its annual air meet 
from Oct. 31 -Nov. 3, in 
Thibodaux. The event is 
sponsored by Nicholls 
State, while the' Nor- 
thwestern squad is 
sponsored by Alpha Eta 
Rho aviation fraternity. 



DELTA SIGMA THETA 
PLEDGES ELEVEN 

Delta Sigma Theta 
has pledged eleven 
women, according to Marva 
Moxey, public relations 
chairman. 

Pledges are Carolyn 
Burton, Letha Rock, Paula 
Rubin, Debra Maddox, 
Yvette Gerrette, Vickie 
White, Cathy Holmes, Rita 
Ravare, Mitzi Adderly, Zella 
Youngblood and Anita 
Reed. 

Officers of the line are 
Rubin, president; 
Youngblood, vice-preside- 
nt; Rock, secretary; Ad- 
derley, treasurer; and 
Ravare, reporter. 

The pledges have had 
several fund raisers and 
community service projects 
thus far, said Ravare. 



MII>IIMIIUII> l.t.t.H * > 




CURRENT SAUCE 
Oct. 23,1984 
Vol.73, No. 10 



Sports 



Not Again! 

Monsoon season hits Shreveportas Tech edges Northwestern, 5-0 



For the 13th time in 14 
years, "this is our year" didn't 
come to pass in Shreveport's 
Independence Stadium, as the 
Louisiana Tech Bulldogs 
downed NSU, 5-0, in a rain- 
soaked game. 

Both coaches agreed that 
the rain affected play; NSU 
had four turnovers while Tech 
had six. 

A near-capacity crowd of 
35,000 was expected for the 
contest. Because of city-wide 
flooding and the torrential rain 
during parts of the game itself, 
actual attendance was 9,404 
umbrella-toting faithfuls 

Things looked good for 
Northwestern in the first 
quarter when Tech return man 
Lifford Jackson fumbled a 
Mike Crowe punt in the end 
zone. Jackson and a sea of 
purple and white converged 
on the loose ball, but after 
unpiling the players, officials 
ruled Louisiana Tech had 
retained possession. Tech 
had dodged a bullet, one of 
the many times they would do 
so during the evening. 

On the next play, Tech 
quarterback Jordan Stanley 
fumbled the ball, but 
recovered it. On second 
down, Stanley's pass was 
intercepted by Demon Freddy 
Smith, giving Northwestern 
the ball at the Tech 25. 

Four plays later, with the 
ball at the 1 7, NSU elected to 
go for a first down instead of a 
field goal. Fullback John 
Stephens was stopped cold 
by the Bulldog defense. 
Dodged bullet number two. 



In the second quarter, 
Anthony Jackson intercepted 
another Louisiana Tech pass, 
this time at the Bulldog 31 . A 
Wayne Van-to-Roy Fontenot 
combination brought the ball to 
the 1 4 on the next play. 

The Demons killed them- 
selves on the possession with 
two straight illegal procedure 
penalties. On third down, Van 
was sacked for a 15-yard 
loss, taking Northwestern out 
of field goal range. Number 
three. 

At the half, it was still 0-0. 

In the third quarter, the 
games first points were made 
not by the Tech offense, but 
by NSU-for the Bulldogs. 
Center Rodney Fulton's snap 
didn't connect with Crowe's 
hands, and the Demon punter 
had no choice but to swat the 
ball out of the end zone, giving 
Tech a 2-0 lead. 

The 'Dogs dominated the 
fourth quarter of play. This 
domination culminated when 
Techster Jon Paul Laque was 
the only player for both teams 
in the vicinity of a Van pass. 
Laque ran the ball 1 4-yards to 
the Demon 29. 

Four plays later, George 
Benyola's kick sailed 42-yards 
through the uprights, giving 
Louisiana Tech its 5-0 margin 
of victory over the Demons. 

For the game, NSU ac- 
cumulated 130 yards total 
offense to Tech's 168. 
Northwestern had eight first 
downs to the Bulldogs' nine. 

This week, Tech travels to 
Lamar while NSU hosts Sam 
Houston. 



Sam Houston hasn 't 
Been here in awhile 



Northwestern's football 
opponent this week is a team 
the Demons haven't faced 
since 1 958. 

The Sam Houston State 
Bearkats will roll into Turpin 
Stadium on Saturday with a 6- 
1 record. The 'Kats have 
defeated Bishop College, 
Stephen F. Austin, South- 
western Oklahoma, SLU, East 
Texas State, and Lamar. The 
lone Houston loss came at the 
hands of Nicholls State, 24-6, 
in a game at Thibodaux. 

The Bearkats are now 2-1 in 
the conference. 

Sam Houston and Nor- 
thwestern have split the six 
games in the series; each 
team has won three. In 1 929. 



Normal fell to Sam Houston, 
26-6. The following year, 
Coach H. Lee Prather's 
Demons went 7-2, losing only 
to powerhouse Loyola and, 
again, Sam Houston. 

The series continued in 
1937, after Harry "Rags" 
Turpin had taken over as 
Demon mentor. Louisiana 
Normal took a 7-6 win over the 
Bearkats that season. Sam 
Houston got revenge, 1 4-6, in 
1938. 

The final two games of the 
series j belonged to Nor- 
thwestern. The 1942 
Demons bombed Sam 
Houston, 26-7, and sixteen 
years later, Northwestern won 
an 1 8-1 1 contest. 




'Nuff mud to make a pig happy 

NSU tackles the Tech Bulldogs in Saturday's rain-soaked clash at Shreveport's In- 
dependence Field. Tech triumphed, 5-0, over the Demons. Northwestern faces Sam 
Houston State, 6-1 , this weekend. 



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Sam Houston (6-1) at Northwestern (4-3) 



Mascot: Demons 
Enrollment: 6,178 
Colors: Purple, white, and orange 
Location: Natchitoches, LA 
Founded. 1884 
Conference: Gulf Star 
Affiliation: NCAA Div. I-AA 
1983 record: 4-7 




Saturday night, 7 p.m., Turpin Stadium 



Mascot: Bearkats 
Enrollment: 10,400 
Colors: Orange and white 
Location: Huntsville, TX 
Founded: 1879 
Conference: Gulf Star 
Affiliation: NCAA Div. I-AA 
1983 record: 4-7 




Aerobic Dancing 



In years past, if a woman 
enjoyed sweating out a 
physical activity an exercise 
program, or tried to keep in 
shape other than by star- 
vation, she was looked upon 
as being just a little less than 
feminine. 

Now, though, things are 
quite different. The typical 



New Steps for Fitness 



American woman is no longer 
ashamed to exercise, to 
sweat. Keeping physically fit 
means more than counting 
calories. Exercise is more than 
sit-ups and jumping jacks. 

At Northwestern, these 
changing viewpoints towards 
exercise have seen the rise in 
popularity of aerobics dan- 




One of those nights 

Quarterback Wayne Van looks downfield after being 
sacked by Louisiana Tech defenders at the State Fair game. 
Van, and the Demon squad as a whole, had a less than 
"spectechular" game. 



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,e to leave a phone number where 
™ ca " be reached. There is a 
J e Xlrnum r "n of two weeks without a 
so* 6 * 31 in writing, so be sure and 
TO "y how they they are to run. 




USL Wins 
CC Meet 

USL claimed the top four 
spots and recorded just 19 
points in winning the Nor- 
thwestern cross country meet 
held at the Natchitoches 
Country Club here last 
Monday. 

The Demons were led b 
freshman Ronald Wilkins i 
sixth place with a time c 
27:22. Other finishers fc 
NSU included Russell Duty h 
10th place (27:48), Chris 
Maggio in 1 6th place (28:54) 
Dean Johnson in 26th place 
(31 :28) and Philip Anasakous 
in 28th place with a time of 
32:25. 



cing, a new form of training 
that has become a favorite of 
many women in the past five 
years. 

Aerobics dancing combines 
exercise with music in the 
form of easy dance steps. The 
primary purpose of this sort of 
exercise is to "increase 
cardio-vascular endurance," 
says Dr. Colleen Lancaster, 
head of the Dept. of Dance at 
NSU. 

Aerobic dance is meant to 
be a positive approach to 
physical fitness, she says. "In 
aerobics, you gradually work 
up. You enjoy the music, like 
being with each other, and 
before you know it, you have a 
good workout." 

This semester, there are 
four beginner-level and three 
intermediate-level aerobics 
classes being offered. Ap- 
proximately 280 students are 
registered for these classes, 
with about 50 being non-NSU 
students who are 
"aerobicizing " through 
Northwesterns' Continuing 
Education classes. 

Karen Lapeyrouse, senior 
secretarial major, has been 
taking aerobics for over a year 
and vouches that "it really 
gets you in shape." 

Elaina Verret, sophmore 
journalism major, has taken 
classes in aerobics since high 
school. "When I came to NSU, 
I audited one last fall, and this 
past spring I took one for 
credit. It's great exercise. If 
you feel down and burned out 
and then you go to aerobics, it 
really pumps your adrenalin. 
Afterwards, you feel like doing 
something, whereas you'd 
probably have gone to bed 
and not have gotten your daily 
exercise otherwise. And by 
exercising with music, you 
enjoy it more. You don't feel 
like you are working as hard. 

The beginning aerobics 
dance class, listed as Dance 
56, can be taken by NSU 
students to fulfill part of their 
core health/personal fitness 
requirement. Each semester, 
a special coed class is of- 
fered, so males interested in 
aerobics dance can enjoy a 
new way of getting in shape, 
too. 



Stretch, 2, 3, 4 



Freshman Shannon Bennett stretches her muscles during 
a cool-down routine during a coed aerobics class. Students 
may take Dance 56 to fulfill part of the health/p.e. 
requirement. 



Scoreboard 



LSU 36, Kentucky 10 

The 1 0th-ranked Tigers turned it loose in the second half to 
bury the previously unbeaten 'Cats. 

Sam Houston 27, Lamar 11 

The Bearkats raised their record to 6-1 on the year with a big 
win over the Cardinals in Huntsville. 

Texas-Arlington 9, Northeast 7 

NLU lost its second game of the year to the Mavericks in 
Monroe. UTA is now 2-0 in the Southland. 

Nicholls 25, Stephen F. Austin 21 

SFA is now 6-2 overall, with both losses coming in GSC con- 
ference games. Nicholls raised its GSC record to 2-1 . 

Arkansas State 16, McNeese State 16 

The 7th-ranked Cowboys has a bad snap at the end of the 
game, forcing a tie with ASU. McNeese is 5-1 -1 . 

Southern Mississippi 13, Mississippi 10 

The Golden Eagles, 2-5, snapped a four-game losing streak 
by surprising Ole Miss. USM faces NSU in two weeks. 

Southwest Texas 10, Southeastern 7 

The Bobcats won their first GSC game by downing the Lions 
in Hammond. Hapless SLU is now 1 -6 on the season. 



8 

Q 



CURRENT SAUCE 
Oct. 23, 1984 
Vol.73, No. 10 



viewpoihi 
Viewpoint, 



/f 's T/ie 
American Way 

The November 6 election is right around the 
corner, so here comes the seventh word from the 
Demon Dictionary: 

Elections - the process by which the people 
choose leaders. Known for name-calling, 
ridiculous amounts of media coverage, and polls, 
polls, and more polls. 

Elections are some of the funniest moments in 
America. A three-candidate debate often looks like 
Larry, Moe, and Curly discussing Communism vs. 
Capitalism. Nobody knows anything... that makes 
sense. 

For years, mudslinging has been popular. Why 
stick to an issue when you can call your opponent a 
dirty name or somehow slander him? 

"Mr. Mondale, you are the most boring, naive, and 
generally unappealing candidate to ever come 
along." 

"Oh, yeah? Well, at least I'm not so old I need 
Geritol twice daily." 

"Age has nothing to do with it. By the way, what 
are we talking about?" 

"Mr. President, we are talking about our future- 
inflation, the arms race, unemployment." 

"Oh, you mean all the problems I inherited from the 
Democrats." 

And while any debate is going on between can- 
didates, you can be sure there are at least 20 
cameras recording the event for posterity. Geraldine 
Ferraro eating a po-boy with her husband in a New 
York deli will probably get more coverage than many 
world events. 

And the big question-can the president make a 
joke without all three networks blowing it out of 
proportion? 

Finally, each candidate, newspaper, TV station, 
ERA group, and Cub Scout troop has their own 
presidential poll. And they all say something dif- 
ferent. Right now, you can find a poll that says the 
election will be close. You can also find one that says 
it will be a Reagan landslide, and (at least) one for 
everything in between. 

Despite the shortcomings of our system, it's still 
pretty good. And of course, if we changed it, what 
would have to laugh at every four years? 

This is the editor speaking. In five minutes, we will 
proceed to bomb the Louisiana Tech campus. 
by John Ramsey 




Editor 



Letter to the Editor 



Dear Editor 

I found your political survey most interesting. It becomes even 
more interesting, I think, when it is viewed in the light of the 
results of an informal survey taken in the classes I have been 
teaching this semester. According to my inexact figures, less 
than 1 precent of the students I polled (out of approximately 
1 50) saw any part of the first presidential debate. From where 
are these students getting their opinions, anyway? 

Craig Nazor 
Dept. of Theater Arts 



RHUBARB Pie for pesseRJ ?| 
..."WE^SiT" i QUIT!!! ^ 




Food for Thought 

There are only so many ways to serve peanut butter - on 
white bread, on brown bread, with jelly,... After awhile, it is 
still only peanut butter and you can stand only so much. Of 
course peanut butter is a staple for many of us. For one thing, 
if you live in the dorm, you can't cook, but a peanut butter 
sandwich does not require cooking and, therefore, it really is 
handy to have around. 

Lately many dorm residents, namely those with variable 
meal tickets, may have had to resort to peanut butter sand- 
wiches and other food items that require no cooking because 
Union Junction, NSU's Student Union Cafeteria, no longer is 
open on weekends. These hours, or non-hours, have 
naturally caused some discontent among students, 
especially those who do not have their own cars to trek 
across town for weekend meals. 

This semester the price of a Variable A meal ticket has 
increased noticeably, and along with that, the prices of some 
food items served in Union Junction have increased, also. So 
all these rising costs have made NSU students feel a little, 
well, discontented, to say the least. 

There are always two sides of every fence, however. 

Take PFM, for instance. Keeping Union Junction open on 
weekends was hurting them financially. According to Bernie 
Giller, director of Professional Food Management, on most 
weekends last year when UJ was open, PFM did not make 
enough money to even cover labor costs, not to mention food 
costs. There just weren't enough students eating in the union 
on weekends last year to warrant weekend hours this year. 

We purchase variable meal tickets from the University, not 
PFM. Northwestern takes the money and gets their share of 
it, and then passes on PFM's share. Northwestern 's "share" 
covers costs for such things as utilities, facilities use and 
maintenance. As the Consumer Price Index rises, everything 
else does, too. Northwestern isn't an island. Utilities ex- 
penses increase, taxes increase and the prices of lettuce and 
potatoes do, too. And so. these costs and cost increases are 
all reflected in the prices we end up paying. No, it doesn't 
seem fair, but this is the real world - nothing is fair. 

For students unable to drive off campus for weekend 
meals, Iberville Cafeteria is open. Granted, it doesn't seem to 
have as cozy an atmosphere as the Union cafeteria, but 800 
students are eating there this semester.... If you are really 
hungry, you can chow down all you want and still pay only 
one price. 

But if this alternative isn't appealing, I suppose there's 
alwavs peanut butter by Lisa Williams 



Current 
Sauce 
Staff 



John Ramsey 
Editor 

Lisa Williams 
Managing Editor 

Stacy Scroggins 
Business Manager 

Lucy LeBlanc 
Darlene Winslow 
Advertising 

Russel Bienvenu 
Circulation 

Bryan Williams 
Layout 

Robin Gunter 
News 

Kim Nolde 
Sports 

Scott Cox 
Gena Williams 
News Staff 

Warren Tape 
Photographer 

Peter Minder 
Adviser 



Current Sauce is 
published weekly by 
students of Northwestern 
State University of 
Louisiana. It is student- 
run and financed, and is 
not associated with any of 
the University's colleges 
or departments. Staff 
members are selected by 
the Editor, with the ap- 
proval of the Student 
Media Board. 

Editorial and business 
offices are located at 
Kyser Hall 225A. Office 
hours are 1-4 p.m. 
Tuesday through Friday- 
The telephone number is 
(318)357-5456. 

All correspondence is 
welcome, and should be 
brought by the office or 
mailed to P.O. Box 5306, 
NSU, Natchitoches, LA 
71497. Deadline for both 
advertising and copy is 1 
p.m. on the Thursday 
preceding Tuesday 
publication. The sub- 
scription rate is $6.00 p* r 
semester. 

Current Sauce is en- 
tered as second class 
mail in Natchitoches, LA. 
USPS number 140-660. 



urrent Sauce 




Northwestern State University 

of Louisiana 

Natchitoches, LA 

November 6, 1984 
Vol. 73, No. 11 



Russel Bienvenu 
Mr. NSU 




is 
by 
■stern 
of 

ident- 
nd is 
any of 
leges 
Staff 
ed by 
e ap- 
udent 

;iness 
id at 
Office 
p.m. 
iday- 
ber is 

ice is 
ild be 
ice of 
5306, 

LA h 
r both 



Oarlene Brown 
Miss NSU 



Friends Not Treating 
Mr. NSU Differently 

After being selected by fellow students as Mr. NSU this year, 
Russel Bienvenu says that his friends "do not treat me any 
differently than before." 

The 21 -year old business administration major from Nat- 
chitoches spends much of his spare time competing in in- 
tramural sporting events for Kappa Sigma Fraternity. Bienvenu 
says he especially enjoys playing flag football, basketball, and 
softball. 

He has been very active throughout his college career. In 
addition to being a member of Blue Key, Student Ambassadors, 
Young Democrats, and circulation manager for the Current 
Sauce, he is also Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority's "Man of the 
Year," and a former Kappa Sigma vice president. 

After graduation in May, he plans to "go to graduate school, 
maybe law school." 

Brown Claims She 
Deserved Miss NSU 

"When I heard that I had been selected as Miss NSU, the first 
thing that went through my mind was that I deserved it. I knew 
that I could hold my head up high and say that I worked for 
Northwestern," said Darlene Brown, from Oakdale. 

The petite senior majoring in home economics is a member of 
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority. She has served on various Student 
Activities Board committees, and was on the Inside View staff 
for three years. She has also been an NSU cheerleader. 

In her spare time, Brown enjoys entertaining with friends and 
"sharing new ideas." 

After graduation in May, she plans to work with the home 
extension service. 




NSU's Own Clark Kent? 

It's not Superman, or Boy Wonder for that matter. It's 
Scott Repp, who doubles as a Northwestern cheerleader and 
snare drummer in the band. Above, Repp makes a hasty 
clothes change at the NSU-Sam Houston game. Notice the 
"Demons" uniform on underneath the band jacket. 



tudents Returning To Conservativism 



luerie 
National Columnist 
jjNGTON - Once the 
Wie"^' ne wspapers 
ht^l 9e campuses 
■7 Black Panthers and 
Today they 
^jp Kemp and Jeana 

PJ* hero of young 
"lovies was an "anti- 
Dustin Hoffman's 
a(e ch aracter in The 
!. h e dopeheads in 
■Today, it is action 
cn as Indiana Jones, 




is en- 
class 
s, LA. 
60. 



Captain Kirk, or The Karate 
Kid. 

Once the publication that 
represented the youth culture 
was the drug-users magazine 
High Times. Today the 
publications that appeal to our 
nation's youth are those that 
use words like "bit" and 
"byte" and "ROM" - the 
computer magazines. 

Once the most prominent 
young people were those in 
the streets shouting "Ho Chi 
Minh is gonna win" and "One, 
two, three, four, we don't 
want your (deleted) war." But 



according to recent Gallup 
Poll, Ronald Reagan, the 
candidate of traditional 
American values, leads the 
nominee of the party of the Me 
Generation by 33 points 
among voters 29 or younger. 
In fact, the younger the voter, 
the more likely he or she will 
support Reagan. 

If the current trend con- 
tinues, Reagan will be the first 
Republican candidate in half a 
century to do better among 
younger voters than among 
older ones. 

Why the change after all the 



HONDALE VS. REAGAN 
See pages 7-8 




see 
page 16 



THE 
BAND 

Lisa Williams' comments 



years of political scientists 
telling us that people got more 
conservative as they grew 
older? 

Part of it has to do with 
recent history. Despite at- 
tempts by Democrats to blame 
the latest recession on 
Reagan, most young people 
affix the blame to Jimmy 
Carter and the liberal 
Congreses that let govern- 
ment get out of control. 

Just as the image of Herbert 
Hoover, promising prosperity 
"just around the corner" 
shaped the political attitudes 




of a previous generation, the 
image of Carter complaining 
about "malaise" shaped the 
attitude of this one. 

Carter is the Hoover of the 
1980s. Now Carter's vice- 
president, Walter Mondale, is 
running for president. He won 
the Democratic nomination 
narrowly, rarely getting more 
than 40 percent of the vote 
despite having the en- 
dorsement of almost every 
interest group in a party made 
up of interest groups, 
see 'Conservative' 
page seven 



DEMONS DOWN USM, 
FACE SLU SATURDAY 




Nov. 6, 1984 Current Sauce Vol. 73, No. 11 




Far From Home 

NSU is a long way from Africa, 
but Shawn Falgoust likes it 



by Kevin Hopkins 

News Staff 

South Africa. It's literally 
"on the other side of the 
world" from Northwestern. It 
is, however, the home of 
Shawn Falgoust, a first- 
semester freshman at NSU. 

Shawn is a member of the 
Spirit of Northwestern mar- 
ching band and is a disc 
jockey on KNWD. 

"I really loved South Africa. 
The country is beautiful," she 
said. "It's a totally different 
world. You'd just have to see 
it." 

"There are problems in 
South Africa," she continues. 
"Politics and racism are big." 
She really respects American 
politics since everyone can 
play an active role in govern- 
ment. Racism is bad in South 
Africa, and according to 
Shawn, virtually impossible to 
avoid. 

"Although it's bad in the 
U.S., too, it's still not like 
South Africa," she said. 

Economics of the two 
nations are similar. In South 
Africa, clothing is of good 
quality and the prices are 
similar to those in the U.S. 
"Food and wine are cheaper 
over there, and are really 
superb," she commented. 

"American youth need a 
little more experience and 
independence," said Shawn. 
"That way, they'll know how to 
function, and they'll know 
what they want from life when 
they get to college." 

She likes NSU "a lot, but I'm 
not being taught enough." She 
feels that the large class size 



in some courses makes the 
teaching so impersonal. 

Shawn likes dorm life; she 
thinks of it as "home away 
from home!' She also finds 
Northwestern's extracurricular 
activities easy to get involved 
with. Shawn would "break' 
down the cliques" if she 
could. 

Her plans for the future 
include leaving the United 
States after two years and 
finishing her higher education 
at the American College in 
France. After that, she'll let life 
take her from there.... 

Window 
Contest 
Slated 

There will be a window 
painting contest held on 
November 26-30 sponsored 
by SAB. This is an annual 
event held to decorate the 
campus in Christmas spirit. 
Everyone is encouraged to 
enter, said David Silver, public 
relations chairman. A fifty- 
dollar first prize will be 
awarded based on neatness, 
use of color and appeal. There 
will also be a thirty-dollar 
second prize and a twenty- 
dollar third prize awarded. 

Entry forms can be obtained 
in Union 214. You must turn in 
a rough sketch of your 
painting with a ten dollar entry 
fee by Friday, November 
16th. 



The 
to tr 
Curre, 
week, 
put th 
severe 
Williai 
count* 
pre 
dale." 1 



She's Probably Not A Commuter... 

Freshman Shawn Falgoust is the Northwestern student farthest from home this yi 
Shawn lives in South Africa, near Johannesburg. 



SAB TO SPONSOR 
FOOD DRIVE 
NEXT WEEK 

The Hospitality and 
Decorations Committee of 
the Student Activities Board 
will be sponsoring a 
Thanksgiving food drive 
November 12-16 in the 
Union lobby from 1 0-3 p.m. 
All faculty-staff and 
students are challenged to 
bring at least one can of 
food. Trophies will be 
awarded to the individual, 
group/organization, and 
department donating the 
most cans. 

Donations will go to 
needy families in the 
Natchitoches area. 



News Brief 



WILDLIFE MAJOR 
GIVEN SCHOLARSHIP 

Johnny Lee Cross, senior 
wildlife management major, 
has been awarded the 
$200 Soil and Water 
Conservation Scholarship. 



ARTWORK NOV! 
ON EXHIBIT 

Paintings and draw* 
by Heather Ryan Kellej 
Lake Charles are now 
exhibit in the Hancn 
Gallery of the Fredert 
Center. 




WEDNESDAY 

Political Party 

Come celebrate your favorite candidate's victory 
> or forget about his defeat! 



4? Phi Mu HOPE Dance 



Help Phi Mu raise money for Project Hope, 
their national philanthropy. Drink specials all night, 
including draft and Tom Collins - $1.00 



U.S.News & World Report presents 

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Vol. 73, No. 11 CurrentSauce Nov. 6, 1984 



Make Up Your Mind! 

These signs were on taped 
I to the windows of the 
Current Sauce office last 
[week. John Ramsey, editor, 
[put the Reagan/Bush sign up 
I several weeks ago. Lisa 
lliams, managing editor, 
[countered last week with her 
[preference Mon- 
■le/Ferraro. 



Reagan 

1 1 imam nun ' '• ■ m 

Push '84 



this y« 




ef 



NOW 

mil 

i draw* 
in Kellej 
ire no* 
: Hanct 
Fredert 




youth, t* 
next dec* 
are they 
jaredfof^ 

coupon 




^ens College Rings avaOable at: 

UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE 
$25 off college rings 

Nov. 12-16 

ferine. 



Jostens College Rings. 



French Club Remains 
Active Organization 



Did you know that NSU has 
a French Club? Most people 
don't. Le Cercle Francais was 
recognized as a campus 
organization in April of this 
year. Already the French Club 
has participated in numerous 
events (Renaissance Fair, Car 
Washes, Intramurals, 
Homecoming Parade....), and 
has had several parties, one 
was a mixer with the Louisiana 
School French Club. 

The purpose of the French 
Club is to promote the French 
language and culture as well 
as to give individuals in- 
terested in French a chance to 
get together and become 
better friends. 

Officers for the '84-'85 year 



are: president, Jon C. 
Mouser; vice-president, 
Wanda Huhner; secretary, 
Paula Rubin; treasurer, Linda 
Rusli; activities coordinator, 
Sami Wehbe; and public 
relations/spokesman, Hanna 
El-Jor. Dr. Rubino is the 
advisor and Teresa Rubino is 
the mascot. The club 
presently has 1 5 members. 

The French Club meets 
every Monday at 4 p.m. in 
Room 240 of the Student 
Union and they have a French 
Study Night every Thursday at 
4 p.m. in the library. They are 
planning to take a trip to a 
neighboring state to visit 
another French Club next 
semester. 



Pathfinders compete 
At NLU, Houston meets 



The NSU Pathfinders 
Orienteering Team recently 
competed in two meets. The 
Southern Orienteering meet at 
Camp Beauregard, LA, 
sponsored by Northeast 
Louisiana University on Oct. 
20-21, and the Texas State 



FOUND: 1 set of car keys with dorm 
room key attached. To Claim keys come 
by the Computer Center, 4ttvFloor Kyser 
Hall. 

FOR SALE: Pharoh Quail, live dressed. 
Eggs, fresh pickled. Rabbits 318-872 
2476. 

FOR SALE: Registered Tennessee 
walking horses. Stallion, mares, 
gelding, weanling colts. 318-872-2476. 

FOR SALE: Four- Year old Panasonic 
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two speakers. $75. 357-1 1 42. 

FOR SALE: Reg. Appaloosa mare 3 
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Must sell. Will sacrifice. Call Nelda, 
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specifications. 4 

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DRAWN to your 
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CLASSIFIED ADS 
To run your claislflod ad In the 

Current Sauce just drop them off in 
the Sauce box at 225A Kyser Hall. Be 
sure to leave a phone number where 
you can be reached. There is a 
maximum run of two weeks without a 
renewal in writing, so be sure and 
specify how they they are to run. 



Championships in Sam 
Houston National Forest, 
sponsored by the Houston 
Orienteering Club on Oct. 27- 
28. 

At Beauregard, NSU's Red 
team took first place in their 
division. Team members were 
Greg Jolly, Gerry Snelson and 
Joe Keating. NSU's Orange 
Team took 3rd place in their 
division. Team members were 
David Silver, Richard Fenoli, 
Grady Norton and Brian 
Marshall. 

Jolly also placed first in the 
individual competition, with 
Snelson and Keating taking 
individual second place 
finishes. Other members 
competing at Beauregard 
were John Edborg, James 
Frazier, Kevin Greenhouse 
and Harold Kay. 

At the Texas State 
Championships, the Red team 
placed fourth. Team members 
were Joe Keating, Greg Jolly, 
Gerry Snelson and Billy 
Nichols. 

In individual competition, 
Fran Hanks placed first and 
Ann Police placed third. David 
Silver placed third in Male 1 9- 
20 Orange and Richard Fenoli 
placed third in Male 21-23 
Orange. 

Other participants were 
Diana Gratten, Brian Marshall 
and Gerry Spencer. 

Last weekend the Orien- 
teering team competed in the 
1984 National in St. Louis 
Missouri. Details were 
unavailable at press time. 



Nov. 6, 1984 CurrentSauce Vol. 73, No. 11 



News 



Murray Takes Serious 
Role In Newest Movie 




In Love 

Bill Murray, star of Ghostbusters, and Catherine Hicks star 
in The Razor's Edge, now playing at the Parkway Cinema in 
Natchitoches. 



Boosters Plan SLU Trip 

The Demon Booster Club will 
sponsor a bus trip to watch the 
Demons play this Saturday 
against Southeastern' in 
Hammond. 

The bus will depart from the 
Field House on Saturday and 
will return following the 
contest. The bus will leave for 
Hammond at noon on Nov. 1 0. 



Cost for the trip to the 
Southeastern game is $21 per 
person, and includes the cost 
of travel and a game ticket. 

Those wishing to make 
reservations should stop by 
the NSU Field House to make 
reservations. Expenses must 
be paid when reservations are 
made. 



Seniors awarded scholarships 



Three seniors have been 
awarded scholarships totaling 
$1,750 from the Louisiana 
Land and Exploration Com- 
pany Foundation. 

Receiving academic awards 
valued at $700 each were 



Cindy Ernst, zoology and pre- 
med major, and John David 
Brouillette, wildlife 
management major. 

A $350 scholarship was 
presented to Thomas Webster 
Rehmann, a geology major. 



Lasyone's 



is now accepting applications for waitress 
to work during the Natchitoches 
Christmas Festival. Tips plus salary. 



Apply in person Wednesday or Thursday 
between 3-5 p.m. at 622 Second Street. 



Bill Murray. He is considered one of 
America's funniest men after starring roles in 
Caddyshack, Stripes and Ghostbusters. 

In the new Columbia motion picture The 
Razor's Edge, Murray plays a much more 
serious role, although there are brief at- 
tempts at humor. 

Murray stars as Larry Darrell, a man ob- 
sessed with finding some meaning in life 
after witnessing the horrors of World War I. 
He has returned home to a beautiful fiancee 
and is offered a high-paying job with an 
established stock brokerage house. There 
remains, however, a spiritual and 



philisophical voice in his life which wealth 
and security cannot fill. 

The story continues as Darrell leaves post- 
war America for Paris, then on to a 
monastery high in the Tibetan mountains, 
where he seeks spiritual enlightenment. 
Years later, his mind and purpose clear, he 
returns to Paris to confront the people and 
problems still unresolved from his past. 

The Razor's Edge is a good movie, but 
bogs down in certain places midway 
through; therefore, the film, gets a six on a 
one to ten scale. It was nice to see Bill 
Murray do such a good job acting, however. 




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Bill 

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HOMECOMING KING 





BUDWEISER > .KING OF BEERS* .ANHEUSER BUSCH INC »ST LOUIS 



Nov. 6, 1 984 Current Sauce Vol . 73, No. 1 1 



Features 



Unlike last year 



Yearbook Ahead of Schedule 



The 1985 Potpourri is 
coming along great and most 
sections are well ahead of 
their deadlines. 

According to Shirley LeDuff , 
graduate advisor, this edition 
will be very creative and full of 
innovative ideas. The first 1 6 
pages will be focusing on the 
Centennial Celebration and 
the history of NSU. The 
Centennial section will be sold 
as a magazine to anyone who 
is interested. The Potpourri 
will also feature a lot of original 



art work and design by staff 
members, spot coloring 
throughout the book, a section 
about the Worlds Fair, as well 
as the usual features. 

There was a problem with 
photography holding up the 
production of last years 
Potpourri, but according to all 
staff members the 
photographers are doing a 
great job. and there is a real 
team effort going on to make 
this issue really special. 

Peter Minder, advisor, 



related, "The Potpourri is in 
tremendous financial trouble, 
it's just something that has 
accumulated over years.' 
Minder also stated that they 
may ask for a student fees 
increase of $5. He believes 
students will be receptive 
when they see the results of 
this year's effort. 

Any student wishing to be a 
part of the staff may pick up an 
application from the Potpourri 
office at Kyser Hall 227. 



Cane River Belles Work Hard 
But Enjoy It, Say Members 



Twelve of NSU's prettiest 
and best dancers march out 
on the field with the band as 
the crowd hears, "...and 
featuring the NSU Cane River 
Belles!" 

Those girls work very hard 
to put on a good show. 

Besides practicing from 2 - 
4 p.m., learning steps and 
perfecting routines and 
working with the band from 4 - 
6 p.m., the Belles take a 
technique class with Karen 
and Craig Nazor from 1 2:30 - 
2:00p.m. 

"The class really does 
improve our technique. We 
learn to be more graceful 
which helps us connect our 
movements more smoothly. It 
also develops our stamina and 
agility," commented Kecia 
Guillory, second year Belle. 

The Belles now march with 
the band which they say, 
makes them feel more like a 
part of the half time show 
instead of a feature. 

The routines and music have 
become more difficult - the 
steps are more intricate and 
the music is a different style. 

"It's hard work and time 
consuming - you have to be 
disciplined and scarifice alot. 
But we love it and feel that it is 
all worth it," says Amy 
Whitford, captain. 

To become a Cane River 
Belle is no easy task, either. 
First an application has to be 
filled out - then the personal 
interview. Each applicant has 
to have a routine prepared to 
perform plus a routine is 
taught. 

The week before each fall 
semester the new Belles have 
a camp. They practice 
everyday from 8 a.m to 1 2 
p.m. which includes an hour of 
jogging every morning 



When the semester begins 
so does the pressure and 
performing. "Sometimes we 
have to learn things within a 
matter of days and that's when 
the pressure hits, but that's 
when we really pull together 
and help each other," said 
Brenda Goldman, captain. 

This year Cane River Belles 
are Brenda Goldman, 4th 
year; Mary Ann Bishop, 4th 
year; Susan Combest, 4th 
year; Amy Whitford 3rd year; 
Liz Borrero, 2nd year; Kecia 
Guillory, 2nd year; Marsha 
Kay McLamore, 2nd year; 1st 



Argus 
Deadline 
Saturday 



The deadline for the Fall 
Literary Contest for Argus, 
NSU's Literary Arts Magazine 
is Saturday, November 10. All 
submissions in the categories 
of Poetry, Short Story, 
Personal Essay and One-Act 
Plays should be made by that 
date. All students, faculty and 
alumni are eligible to enter the 
magazine's contest and are 
encouraged to do so. 

The entries are to be 
brought to the Argus office at 
Kyser Hall, 31 6A. Each entry 
should have a separate cover 
card attached to it (cover 
cards are available on the 
office door). 

All entries that are submitted 
after the November 1 
deadline will be considered as 
submissions to Argus' spring 
contest, to be judge next 
semester. 



year Belles are Lisa Kane, 
Chrissy Bailey, Janice Wheat, 
Hillary Varet and Yvette 
Jordan. 

Mrs. Parrish is the director 
and mom. "She is always 
friendly and helpful - the best!" 
says Linda Kane. 

The spirit of NSU is also a 
big help to the Belles. They all 
agreed that the band is 
'Awesome, so good!' "the 
band keeps us fired up and 
makes us work harder, their 
enthusiam makes us want to 
perform, commented Marsha 
Kay McLamore. 




feasona 

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pessage 
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Wed S 
ntry in tl 
Young 
linoritie; 
Wpetin 



! 



Gettin' It Together 

Potpourri greek editor Skip Waters and apprentice Celeni * rien c& 
Strickland go over details before being sent to the publisher e y car 
The book, unlike last year's edition, is on schedule. at 

"Wyer 
&neve 
^ mus 

I tan; 

If* Perm 
The 



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Vol. 73, No. 1 1 Current Sauce Nov. 6, 1 984 



ire& 




News 



Conservative 



cont. from p. 1 

He is running as the can- 
jdate of the political 
jstablishment, and, as usual, 
ie most anti-establishment 
yoting group in America is the 
Loung people. 

Mondale's cause among the 
toung is not helped by the fact 
that the Democratic Party 
ipparently no longer con- 
fers young people an im- 
lortant part of its coalition. 

Democratic complaints 
tout Social Security almost 
ever address the concerns 
flung people have about the 
antinued existence of the 
iystem . Many young workers 
tan't expect Social Security to 
nt when they reach 
e'rement age. 



Democrats' opposition to a 
JcflHSonal sub-minimum wage 
3Lp youth sends a clear 
^WJjessage to the young. As in 
Mi Africa, the minimum 
'age is often used in the 
Wed State as a barrier to 
"try in the workforce. 
Young people, especially 
*orities, are prohibited from 
ompeting with more ex- 
tice CeleM fenced workers because 
( publish* *y cannot offer their ser- 
Ke s at a lower cost to the 
"Woyer. Without jobs, they 

* never get the experience 
^ J* must have to qualify for 

J 8 at the minimum wage. 
Fy of them join the ranks of 
permanently unemployed. 
JJ e consistent anti- 
oology bias of the 
*"ocratic Party also 
* nate s young workers, who 

* automation more as an 
™tunity than as a threat, 
"jjfl People realize the 
pfcrats "industrial policy" 

*nat it is: a proposal the 
" ea ucrats in Washington run 
"Economy 



e. 



j ^ vln Q grown up in a nuclear 
1* young people are less 
j? e Ptible to superstitions 
X : n uclear power (such as 

- „ 7 th that a nuclear reactor 

k ***HSik X ( plode >- Many of them 
stand that by providing 
Alternative source of 
„, nuclear power plants 
^ Possible to leave high- 
c °al in the ground, 
HjT* of burning it and 
Htff, the air. Walter 



v*enue 



party consistently 
s the use of nuclear 



m. Resident wants to use 

def s P ace weapons 
e, 6b T ^d this country, 
making nuclear war no 



longer feasible. He has 
proposed a permanent space 
station and has worked to 
make space technology 
available to American industry 
as never before. Compare 
Reagan's attitude with that of 
Mondale, who opposes a 
space-based defense system 
and who, as a U.S. Senator, 
proposed the space shuttle 
project be scrapped. Which 
attitude is closer to that of our 
young people? 

There is other evidence of a 
change in the political 
orientation of young people. 
As shown on the TV program 
20/20, ABC News recently 
conducted a study in which 



groups of people were shown 
old TV news stories and asked 
whether the stories made 
them feel patriotic; good about 
America. 

The news stories covered 
such events as the Korean 
Airlines massacre, the in- 
vasion of Afghanistan, the 
killing of Marines in Beirut and 
the liberation of Grenada. 
Three groups consistently 
rated highest in their feelings 
of patriotism: veterans of 
World War I and II, and Korea; 
Marine recruits; and at the top 
of the list, young people, high 
school students. (At the 
bottom, teachers, peace 
activists, former protestors, 




Fbr Education., 
For America.., 



We'll find out tonight 

The presidential election is today, and by tomorrow, these 
election materials will probably be history. The driver of an 
Isuzu truck (bottom)parked in the Kyser parking lot is ob- 
viously a Reagan fan, while one of the offices in the A.A. 
Fredericks Center displays a Mondale/Ferraro campaign 
sign. 




*m0*m ********* . 





and, in last place, retired 
persons.) 

Society's greatest changes 
occur gradually, with few 
people noticing until after they 
are completed. Today, all 
around us, a new generation is 
returning to the traditional 
values abondoned by many of 
their elders. 

After the 1980 election, 
there were predictions the 
domination of American 
politics by Franklin 
Roosevelt's "New Deal 
coalition" might be coming to 
an end. The shift in political 
preferences of young people 
is the first positive sign that a 
realignment may be coming 



together. There are 29 million 
American 1 8-24; two-thirds of 
their votes may go to Reagan 
on election day. 

If Reagan and his party 
represent the opportunities of 
the future, while Mondale and 
his party try to revive the 
politics of the past, those 
predictions will come true by 
the end of this decade, and, 
as they said in my youth, 
there'll be a whole lotta shakin' 
goin' on. 



Richard Viguerie, a con- 
servative activist, operates 
and directs a marketing ad- 
vertising agency in Virginia. 



Regents Approve 
Admission Standards 



The Board of Regents has 
approved new standards of 
admission for students en- 
tering professional teacher 
education programs at in- 
stitutions of higher education 
in Louisiana, effective in the 
fall of 1 985. 

The new requirements call 
for minimum scores of 644 on 
the general knowledge portion 
of the National Teacher 
Examination (NTE) and 645 
on the communications skills 
section of the NTE. The 
standards, proposed by 
Louisiana's deans of 
education, will apply to all 
state-approved teacher 
education programs in 
Louisiana. 

William Arceneaux, com- 
missioner of higher education, 
said, "Because these are the 
same scores required on 
these sections of the NTE for 
teacher certification in 
Louisiana, the scores are 
manifestly relevant to the real 
world." The board's action, 
Arceneaux explained, was 
part of an ongoing effort by 
the regents to raise standards 
and improve the quality of the 
applicant pool for professional 
programs in teacher 
education. 

Act 836 of the 1 984 regular 
legislative session mandated 
that by the end of 1984, 
Louisiana's deans of 
education, subject to the 
Board of Regents' approval, 
"shall choose an entrance 
examination for admission to 
state-approved teacher 
education programs." 

The regents stipulated that 
in addition to the required 



scores, during August of each 
year, beginning in 1 986, each 
institution offering such 
programs shall submit to the 
board: 1) the numbers of 
applicants who reported 
scores, respectively, on the 
general knowledge and 
communication skills sections 
of the NTE: 2) the distribution 
of scores students achieved, 
on both sections; and 3) the 
number and respective scores 
of provisionally admitted 
students who did not achieve 
minimum cutoff scores on the 
NTE. 

"This year-by-year ac- 
cumulation of data, in concert 
with other information, will 
provide a basis for assessing 
the efficiency of this policy in 
upgrading the quality of our 
teachers," Arceneaux stated. 
"Additionally, this action will 
ensure uniformity of standards 
and enforcement statewide. 
He explained that adoption of 
the new policy rescinds and 
replaces, effective at the end 
of the summer session of 
1 985, the teacher education 
program admission standards 
adopted by the Regents in 
1981, which applied only to 
public institutions. The former 
policy was based on American 
College Test scores, coupled 
with high school grade point 
averages. The new policy 
permits the deans of 
education to admit selected 
students failing to meet the 
acceptable cutoff scores, up 
to a total of 10 percent of 
those who meet the scores 
and are admitted. The former 
policy allowed a similar ex- 
ception. 



Nov. 6, 1984 Current Sauce Vol. 73, No. 11 



8 



The '84 Vote: Shaping America's Fun 




Every four years, a fantastic event takes place in 
America. It's not the Olympic Games or leap year, 
but the election of the most powerful man in the world 
- the president of the United States. 

Tuesday, November 6, 1984 marks the 50th 
presidential election day in the history of the republic. 
The world will find out tonight - will Ronald Reagan 
lead our nation for the next four years, or will 
Walter Mondale score the biggest election upset 
since Truman defeated Dewey in 1 948? 

Election Day 1 984 marks probably the clearest 
choice in some time. On no major issue do both 
primary tickets agree. The main concern of the 
Democrats is foreign policy, or the lack of it, under 
Reagan. The Republicans are focusing more on 
America's economy, which by all indicators, has 
greatly improved since 1 980. 

For the first time, a woman is on the ticket of a 
major party for a nationwide executive position. Will 
Geraldine Ferraro help or harm the Democrats? The 
results will be interesting. 

Not only is Ferraro's gender making news, but the 
personalities of the candidates have also been 
scrutinized during the election. Polls have shown 
that in the eyes of the average American, Ronald 
Reagan is charismatic, witty, and just plain likeable. 
Walter Mondale, on the other hand, is dull and too 
serious. Ironically, many people feel Ferraro comes 
across to the public better than does Vice-President 
Bush. 

The right to vote was extended to certain groups by 
the Constitution. It was extended during the 
Reconstruction years following the Civil War. The 
right was further extended in the 1920's, when 
women were enfranchised. Civil rights legislation of 
the 1 960's insured every American the right to vote. 

Unfortunately, only about half of all registered 
voters actually pull a lever on election day. Simple 
mathematics dictates that about 30 percent of the 
population is making the decisions regarding our 
nation. Thirty percent... 

Today, college students are registered in record 
numbers. Young Americans are in the position to 
keep America on course or change course if 
necessary. The choice, and the vote, is up to you. 




IE 



mm 



Nudu 

"Stai 
prog 
MXi 
Bib 
Incii 
fens . 



Ronald Reagan 




HIGHER EDUCATION 



MONDALE 



Federal stu- 
dent loans, 
grants, other aid* 
Abolish 
Department of 
Education* 



Will 


Cut in 1981. 


strengthen. 




NO 


YES 




Vol. 73, No. 1 1 Current Sauce Nov. 6, 1 984 




HE ISSUES AND PARTY PLATFORMS 



AMNTROL 



Nuch 

"Stat 

prog 

MXi. 

Blb( 

Incn 

fens* 



MONDALE 


REAGAN 


YES 


NO 


NO 


YES 


NO 


YES 


NO 


YES 


3-4% 


7.5% 




THE ECONOMY 



MONDALE 



How to cut 
federal deficits. 



Balanced 
Budget 
Amendment* 
Jobs for youth* 



GHTS 



Tax reform, 
cut military 
spending 
increases 



NO 



Targetted 
training 
programs. 



REAGAN 



Strong 
economic 
recovery for 
increased 
revenue, cut 
spending. 
YES 



Supports 
subminimum 
wage. 




Walter Mondale 



W 



u. 



pinion, 

i 




YES 


NO 


YES 


NO 


NO 


YES 


Calls for 
"verifiable 
measure- 
ments." 
Supported. 

YES 


Opposes 
quotas. 

Signed after 

initial 
opposition. 
NO 




CENTRAL AMERICA 





U.S. Aid 

to Nicaraguan 

rebels* 

U.S. Aid to 

El Salvador* 

"Contadora 

process" for 

negotiated 

settlement* 

U.S. military 

in Central 

America. 

Mining of 

Nicaraguan 

harbors* 



MQNPALE 



NO 



Tie to hurdan 
rights. 
YES 



Remove all 
foreign forces. 

NO 



REAGAN 



YES 

YES 
wavering. 



YES in 
Honduras. 

YES 



I 



Nov. 6, 1 984 Current Sauce Vol. 73, No. 1 1 



10 



Sports 



Roundballers Sixth In GSC Balloting 




But you gotta play defense... 

Junior guard Roy Roach confers with head basketball coach Wayne Yates during one of 
last week's practices. The Demons began preparation for the opening clash with Texas 
as the Gulf Star coaches and sportswriters picked them last in conference. 



Bearkats Bite The Dust, 38-7 



After a one week lapse, 
Northwestern's offense 
returned to mid-season form 
two weeks ago as the Demons 
ran over Sam Houston, 38-7. 

Offensively, quarterback 
Wayne Van had his best game 
of the year, passing for 1 94 
yards and running for an 
additional 53 for a combined 
yardage figure of 247. The 
junior signal-caller also ran for 
one score, a two-yarder, and 
passed for his second longest 
touchdown of the 1 984 
campaign, a 44 yard strike to 
DeShon Jenkins, a former 
NSU basketball player. That 
catch was Jenkins' first of his 
career. 

John Stephens got the 
Demons first touchdown on a 
one-yard drive and later in the 
first quarter dragged much of 
the Sam Houston defense with 
him on a nine-yard TD. He 
ended the night as the 
Demons leading rusher, 
picking up 56 yards in 12 
carriers. Chris Chenier, NSU's 
leading rusher on the season 
with 438 yards to date, 
carried only four times but got 
the most out of his efforts with 
47 yards. Elliott Dawson, 
finally over an ankle injury, 
retained his second position 
on the Northwestern rushing 



charts with 35 yards and a 
touchdown. The four 
touchdowns on the ground 
marked a Demon high for the 
season. 

Odessa Turner returned two 
kicks for 69 yards, coming 
close to breaking both of 
those for touchdowns. Benny 
Brouillette had a good night, 
as the placekicker tallied eight 
points to give him 33 for the 
season. His first two points 
came on a conversion run 
after he took an option pitch 
from holder Rob Fabrizio. The 
senior also converted three of 
three "regular" extra point 
attempts and nailed a 37-yard 
field goal in the second 
quarter. 

For the first time all year, the 
Demon defense did not in- 
tercept a pass. But they still 
lived up to their ranking as l-AA 
leaders in scoring defense, 
and came very close to 
shutting out their second 
opponent of the year. Sam 
Houston managed a touch- 
down on a fourth and one from 
the NSU one with but 2:17 
remaining in the game. 

That six-pointer broke a 
string of 13 consecutive 
quarters that the opposition 
had not been able to crack the 
Northwestern State goal line 



Northwestern's youthful 
basketball team, preparing for 
the 1984-85 season opener 
at the University of Texas, 
didn't get much respect in the 
pre-season balloting within the 
Gulf Star Conference. 

The Demons, coming off a 
6-22 record a year ago, were 
picked to finish last in the six 
team conference. . The 
Demons were picked for the 
basement on 32 of the 38 
ballots, while receiving two 
votes for third place and four 
votes for fifth place. 

Nicholls State, which posted 
a 1 9-7 record a year ago, was 
tabbed as the pre-season 
favorite, followed by Stephen 
F. Austin, Southeastern, Sam 
Houston, Southwest Texas 
and NSU. 

Nicholls State received 26 
first place votes and 214 total 
points, while the Lumberjacks 
have three first place votes 
and 1 64 points. Southeastern 
LA, being guided by first year 
Coach Newton Chelette, 
received eight first place votes 
and 157 total points. 

"Based on what our record 
was last season and that we 
have four lettermen returning I 
didn't think we would be 
picked high," said Coach 
Wayne Yates. "But, if our kids 



survive our early schedule 
with a strong attitude, we can 
cause some problems in the 
league. We have more talent 
than we did a year ago and our 
players don't feel they are a 
last place team. We should 
only get better as the season 
progresses. Even with our 
record last year, we did beat 
Southeastern once and played 
very competitively at Nicholls 
State." 

The pre-season all- 
conference team was also 
released with SLU and Sam 
Houston each placing two 
players on the team and 
Nicholls one player on the five- 
man team. 

Cedric Robinson, a 6-7 
junior center at Nicholls State, 
was the only unanimous 
choice for the team. Others on 
the squad include forwards 
Thelander Tillman (6-8, Sr.) of 
Southeastern Louisiana and 
Bruce Allen (6-6, Jr.) of Sam 
Houston State. The guards are 
BoBo McNair (6-3, Sr.) from 
Southeastern and Regi Harris 
(6-2, Sr.) from Sam Houston 
State. 

Donald Mays, a 6-7 junior 
center from Northwestern, 
was one of 12 players 
nominated for the pre-season 
honor squad. 




Go West, Young Man! 

Coach Sam Goodwin talks It over with quarterback Rob Fabrizio during NSU's 38-7 romp 
over Sam Houston two weeks ago. The Demons solidified their hold on the GSC lead with 
the win. 




I 



GRADUATE 

to the rich, smooth taste of MichelokLight. 




1 



Vol.73, No. 11 CurrentSauce Nov. 6, 1984 
Vol. 73, No. 1 1 Current Sau ce Nov. 6, 1984 



Sports 



13 



Demons shock Southern Miss, 
Can earn GSC title Saturday 



by John Ramsey 

Editor 

HATTIESBURG, Miss. - This 
is a quiet little Mississippi town 
after Saturday's homecoming 
game. 

Both city residents and 
University of Southern 
Mississippi students are still 
smarting from the 22-0 
shellacking given their Golden 
Eagles at homecoming. It was 
the first shutout of a USM 
team since Auburn blitzed the 
Eagles in 1 980. This time, it 
was done by the l-AA Nor- 
thwestern Demons, the 
"powerpuff" team scheduled 
last year for an easy win. 

Northwestern pulled off one 
of the biggest college football 
upsets of the week by 
downing the Eagles, who fell 
to an unusual 2-7 record. 
Earlier, USM had played 



GSC Standings 



NSU 
Nicholls 
SW Texas 
Sam Htn. 
SLU 
SFA 



3-0 

3-1 

2-1 

2-2 

0-3-1 

0-3-1 



the Demons got moving again. 
NSU moved the ball 59 yards 
to the USM 14. The drive 
stalled, but Brouillette added a 
34-yard field goal to give the 
visitors a 1 0-0 margin over the 
stunned Mississippians. 

The lone Southern Miss 
threat came as the half came 
to a close. USM's attempted 
field goal was blocked by 
defensive tackle Tank Berry, 
ending the threat. 

In the third quarter, the 
Demon defense rose to stop 
USM cold on the Eagles' first 
possession. When NSU got 
the ball, Van moved the 
Demons downfield using both 
passes and short runs. Van 
tossed a 1 7-yarder to Ron 
Haggerty to put Northwestern 
on top, 16-0. Brouillette's 
extra point attempt was 
blocked. 

In the fourth quarter, USM 
recovered a Demon fumble in 
Northwestern territory, but 
NSU's number-one ranked 
defense sacked the quar- 
terback twice and forced the 
Eagles to punt. The punter 
bobbled the ball, giving NSU 
the ball way back at the 
Southern Miss 31 . 



competitive games with 
Auburn, Georgia, and 
Mississippi State. The two 
Golden Eagle wins came 
against Louisiana Tech and 
Ole Miss. Ironically, Tech is 
one of three schools to have 
beaten Northwestern this 
year. 

With the win, Northwestern 
moved to 6-3 on the season. 
The Demons are 3-0 in the 
Gulf Star Conference, and can 
clinch the conference 
championship with a victory 
Saturday night against the 2- 
6-1 SLU Lions in Hammond. 

Should the Demons win the 
last two games, chances are 
good that Northwestern will 
earn its first NCAA playoff 
berth in school history. 

A season-high crowd of over 
24,000 disappointed Golden 
Eagle fans was on hand to 
witness the fun. 

After a scoreless first 
quarter, NSU quarterback 
Wayne Van capped off a 78- 
yard drive with a 34-yard pass 
to Odessa Turner. Benny 
Brouillette added the extra 
Point, putting Northwestern 
up, 7-0. 

Midway through the quarter, 



Three minutes later, Van 
found the endzone again. This 
time, he did the honors himself 
on a 2-yard option run. 
Brouillette missed the kick, but 
Northwestern closed scoring, 
22-0. 

The game was the first NSU 
win over a Division I team 
since the 1 977 Demons upset 
Southwestern Louisiana, 20- 
13 

Northwestern picked up 
319 yards total offense, to 
just 1 28 for USM. The Eagles 
picked up only six yards in the 
second half. 

Coach Sam Goodwin 
commented, "We thought we 
could play with them and we 
thought we could win, but we 
did not count on a 22-0 
score." 

"Northwestern played an 
outstanding football game. 
We got down early and were 
hard-pressed to get our 
players rallied." said USM 
boss Jim Carmody. 

With the win, Goodwin is 
now 1 0-1 in his second year 
at Northwestern. 



Scoreboard 



LSU 32, Mississippi 29 

LSU, 6-1-1, came from behind to avoid a second straight 
upset in Tiger Stadium before 77,649 fans. 

Northeast 12, Louisiana Tech 10 

Just like last year - we beat NLU, they beat Tech, and Tech 
beats us. The Indians are now in the drivers seat in the 
Southland. 

Southeastern 30, Southwest Missouri 24 

The Lions upset SMSU to raise their record to 2-6-1 on the 
season. SLU hosts Northwestern this weekend. 

Lamar 20, Nicholls 16 

The Cardinals won only their second game of the year by 
downing the Colonels in Beaumont. 

Texas-Arlington 24, McNeese 2u 

UTA remained in the thick of the Southland race by downing 
the Cowboys. McNeese was eliminated from the conference 
race. 

Southwest Texas 24, Stephen F. Austin 7 

Stephen F. is unbeaten outside the GSC, but the 'Jacks are 0- 
3-1 in conference play. 

USL 42, East Carolina 24 

Southwestern won its fourth straight by downing the Pirates in 

Lafayette . 




I Knew I Should 've Thrown It! 

The Sam Houston defense sacks Rob Fabrizio for a loss at 
the game two weeks ago. It was one of a few bright spots for 
the Bearkats, who were on the short end of a 38-7 score. 



Lady Demons Chosen 
As Gulf Star Favorites 



The Lady Demon basketball 
team has been tabbed as the 
pre-season favorite for the 
first-ever Gulf Star Cham- 
pionship in women's 
basketball. Following the Lady 
Demons in the pre-season 
rankings are Stephen F. 
Austin, Southwest Texas, 
Southeastern, Sam Houston 
and Nicholls. 

The Lady Demons were 
picked for the top spot in the 
league by 21 of the 31 votes 
cast by coaches, school 
publicity personnel and the 
media. Stephen F. Austin 
earned eight first place votes 
while Southwest Texas State 
and Sam Houston State each 
received one vote for the top 



spot. 

Northwestern has put 
together five straight winning 
seasons under Coach Pat 
Pierson and the Lady Demons 
return three starters from the 
team that posted a 15-11 
mark a year ago. 

One of those starters, junior 
guard Lonnie Banks, was also 
named to the six-member pre- 
season all-conference team 
which consists of one player 
from each school. Joining 
Banks on the team are Realia 
Davis of Nicholls, Rene 
Daniels of Southeastern, 
Rosalind Johnson of Stephen 
F. Austin, Linda Meulker of 
Southwest Texas and Connie 
Fillick of Sam Houston. 



Let's Fill 
Strawberry Stadium! 

Join the Caravan to Hammond 
Call the SGA office for details 



- >' v...iM«it»«»<*t«»W»4»**«<*f • •«•*»♦« 



Northwestern (6-3) at Southeastern LA (2-6-1 ) 



Mascot: Demons 
Enrollment: 6,178 
Colors: Purple, white, and orange 
Location: Natchitoches, LA 
Founded: 1884 
Conference: Gulf Star 
Affiliation: NCAADiv. I-AA 
1983 record: 4-7 




vs 




Saturday night - 7 p.m. 
Strawberry Stadium, Hammond 



Mascot: Lions 
Enrollment: 9,000 
Colors: Green and gold 
Location: Hammond, LA 
Founded: 1925 
Conference: Gulf Star 
Affiliation: NCAADiv. I-AA 
1983 record: 6-5 



IM Playoffs Underway, 
TKE, Sigs Undefeated 



Intramural flag football action 
concluded last week, and the 
playoffs began on Monday. 

The mens' independent 
division games of the final 
week included the Mansfield 
Tigers defeating the Red 
Devils, 24-6, and Totally 
Awesome over Blind Boys, 
29-20. 

After the loss, Red Devils 
came back to stifle the 
Budmen, 26-6. The Budmen 
streak of bad luck continued 
later in the week, as they were 
defeated by the Jocks, 1 4-0. 
Blind Boys downed Sudden 
Impact, 12-6, to conclude 
both teams' seasons. 

The Steelers beat the 
Jocks, 20-1 9, on Thursday to 
clinch a playoff berth in the 
Independent Orange division. 
The two teams, along with the 
Mansfield Tigers, finished at 
3-1 . The Jocks an Steelers 
finished first and second, 
respectively. 

Totally Awesome and Yang 
took the two playoff positions 
in Independent Purple. 

In mens' fraternity play, both 
Kappa Sigma and TKE's first 
teams concluded the season 
unbeaten, as the Sigs won the 
purple division and the Tekes 
won the orange. 

Three teams - Phi Beta 
Sigma, Sigma Tau Gamma, 
and Kappa Sigma no. 2 - 
finished in the orange division 
at 2-2. Phi Beta made the 
playoffs as the second place 
squad. In last week's only 
game, TKE downed Sig Tau, 
19-7. 

The remaining orange team, 
KAno. 2, finished at 0-4. 



In the purple division, ar- 
chrivals KA and Kappa Sig, 
both unbeaten, played on 
Thursday. The Sigs, who shut 
out every opponent during the 
regular season, won 14-0. 
Kappa Sig won the fraternity 
division last year, when it 
included all nine teams. 

Last Monday, TKE no. 2 
beat Theta Chi, 7-0, to claim 
third place. Theta Chi and 
Alpha Phi Alpha finished in 
fourth and fifth. 

In the women's division, big 
rivals Tri-Sigma and Phi Mu 
claimed the top two playoff 
berths, although the two 
teams will meet this week to 
determine the champion. 
Third place went to TNT, a 1 5- 
7 winner over Sigma Kappa 
this week. The Kappa's took 
fourth. Also last week, Sigma 
Kappa upset Phi Mu, 13-12, 
and the unbeaten Tri-Sigma's 
downed TNT, 7-0. 

Louisiana Ladies finished at 
1-5, while Odyssey and 
Un Kappa Fifth, last year's 
overall champ, forfeited out. 

In playoff action, three 
games were held on Monday. 
KA met TKE, Yang took on the 
Jocks, and Totally Awesome 
met the defending mens' 
champion Steelers. Details 
were unavailable at press 
time. 

On Tuesday, Kappa Sigma 
meets Phi Beta Sigma at 3:30. 

The womens' first place 
team will meet Sigma Kappa 
on Thursday, and on the same 
day the second place squad 
meets TNT. Both games are 
at 3:30. 



Congratulations 
Russel!!! 

Mr. NSU 1984 



From your Brothers 
AEKDB 




Blind Boys Win One 

Eddy Thomas unloads a pass in last Thurday's IM game between Blind Boys and 
Sudden Impact. Blind Boys won, 1 2-6, but failed to make the playoffs. 



We want you to 
know us better! 



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Think You'll Like What 
You See. 

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Vol . 73, No. 1 1 Current Sauce Nov. 6, 1 984 



Letters 



15 



Current 
Quotes 

What do you think the 
outcome of the 
presidential election 
will be? 





i 



Denise Brown 
Freshman 

Reagan, because Mondale 
is not qualified and he's too 
dull. 




Clay Mayeaux 
Sophomore 

Reagan will win it. 
smarter than Mondale. 



He's 





Ronald Turner 

Freshman 

Reagan will be put back in 
office because there is no 
support of the Democratic 
Party. 



Ellen Dollar 

Junior 

Reagan will win, 
it's sad. 



but I think 



Bill Hussey 

Language Arts Faculty 

It will be a severe disap- 
pointment for those of us who 
continue to affirm the 
traditional values of our culture 
over the current trendy limited 
notions of self-interest. 



Sauce Policies Clarified 



by Peter Minder 

Adviser 

In an effort to clarify the policies and 
objectives of the Current Sauce, I meet 
weekly with Editor John Ramsey to discuss 
the weekly production factors that have 
worked out smoothly and those that have 
not worked out smoothly. 

We have agreed that some mid-semester 
clarifications of Current Sauce objectives 
should be presented to the student body. 

In introductory mass communications 
courses, we learn that some publications are 
satisfied with being "publications of record." 
This means that they will cover the formal 
activities of the community and that they are 
content to report only the overt activities. 
Another term used to describe this type of 
journalism is "denotative journalism" This 
term would imply that the newspaper covers 
events in a reactionary manner to record 
explicit occurrences. This type of news 
coverage is generally non -controversial. 
Main events, well-known to the small 
community through word of mouth com- 
munication are recorded for the written 
record . 

The Current Sauce tries to function as a 
newspaper, not an announcement bureau. 
We accept paid advertising. Paid ad- 
vertisements mean you get to use the forum, 
the Current Sauce, to specifically announce 



what you are interested in seeing conveyed. 

College journalism can be a training 
ground. A time to learn how to improve 
writing skills, a time to see your com- 
positions in print and a time to provide an 
enlightening service to the community are 
key ingredients of collegiate journalism. 

College newspapers generally strive for a 
more sophisticated level of journalism than 
"publications of record." At the beginning of 
this semester the objectives were to im- 
prove the layout, add more interviews, add 
more varied feature stories, and give the 
news stories more depth when the situation 
dictated a closer analysis. 

The role of the editor is pivotal in making 
this progression. He must decipher the 
consequences of his omissions and in- 
clusions of news. In the textbook News 
Reporting and Writing, Melvin Mencher 
states: "Impersonal and objective as some 
journalists would like to make the deter- 
minants of news, journalism clearly is based 
on selection, and choice is a highly personal 
matter. It derives from factors such as the 
reporter's professional background, his or 
her education and the intangible influences 
of family and friends. Even more elusive are 
the decisions that have their origin in the 
arena where ambition and conscience 
battle." 



Senior Supports 
Mondale/Ferraro 



Dear Editor 

Today is election day and I couldn't let it go by without ex- 
pressing my opinion on the candidates and the issues. We are 
all concerned with the issues of this campaign, and as caring 
human beings, I believe the choice is a clear one to make. 

Walter Mondale and the Democratic Party are offering us a 
higher quality of life, and this offering is being made for every 
one of us, not just the corporate leaders or the wealthy. Quality 
of life should not be reserved for upper echelons, but should be 
spread throughout, for all individuals. 

Issues such as education, womens rights, civil rights and 
social services for the elderly, make up a bundle of the concerns 
and it's sad to think that these are being placed to the side for 
one other issue. 

This other issue, the combination of nuclear arms and foreign 
policy, is hard for people to understand. But when we go to the 
polls today, we should keep in mind that that attitude is par- 
ticularly important. The attitude of the present administration has 
been negative and definitely not of a diplomatic frame of mind. 
Peace through strength is idealistic. More realistically, however, 
is peace through friendly relations and peace through open- 
minded negotiations. The Mondale/Ferraro ticket has the 
willingness to discuss peace and nuclear arms reduction. The 
president and his administration have not shown this willingness. 

What we need to remember when we vote, is that people are 
the most important issue of the campaign. The question is, "we 
or me?" 

Renee' Barton 
Senior 

Argus Needs 
Student Help 

Dear Editor 

The time once again is upon us. Argus, NSU's Literary Arts 
magazine, is asking that submissions to its fall contest be made 
now! The deadline for these submissions is November 1 0. 

In the past, students, faculty and alumni works have given 
Argus its reputation as a prize-winning and respected magazine. 
In this our Centennial year at Northwestern, I would hope that 
we could go far beyond what we have in the past. We have the 
talent, the ability and the knowledge. But like anything else, the 
student body must make an effort to contribute. And con- 
tributing to Argus is not a hard task. Therefore, there is no 
reason why even the most apathetic among us should not 
submit his works. 

All you have to do is take your works (poetry, short story, 
personal essay, one-act, etc.) to the Argus office, Kyser Hall 
31 6-A, fill out a cover sheet on each piece you submit, and if no 
one is there to receive it, slide it under the door, or give it to 
Argus advisor, Neill Cameron. And if you have any questions, 
and you are unable to find anyone to answer them (a staff 
member, Mr. Cameron, me) around the office or the Department 
of Languages, you can call me at work (T & Th- 8:00-4:30) at 
352-2612 OR at home after 6:30 at 357-0377. (If I am not 
there, please insist on leaving your name and number and I'll call 
you back... excuse my rude comments you might receive, I 
promise they're not personally aimed at you....) 

Geez Louise, folks... this is your magazine! Your creativity, 
your talents, your ideas are what have made Argus soar in the 
past. I can't help but wonder if one hundred years of progress is 
leading us into a century of apathy now. 

Don't let your magazine down, submit your works to the fall 
contest by its November 1 deadline.. . Argus needs you. 

Leslie Anne Gregory 
Editor, Argus 



Nov. 6, 1984 Current Sauce Vol. 73, No. 11 



16 



Viewpoint 



Do Something 
Worthwhile 



Word number eight from the Demon Dictionary has 
nothing, believe it or not, to do with the Presidential 
election. 

Petition - a (usually worthless) piece of paper 
with a complaint and many signatures, some of 
which are authentic. The purpose of this is to get 
something done, or changed. 

Since I've been at NSU, I've been presented with 
several petitions - six, to be exact. I've refused 
signature on all of them; most were poorly thought 
out and were not followed throuqh. 

Last year, however, students banded together and 
made a petition work. It was during the infamous SGA 
presidential election. Because of the petition, a lot of 
minds were changed. Rules were bended, and Tod 
Klotzbach is now SGA president. 

Currently, a petition to force KNWD to change its 
format is in the works. Like all others, I flatly refused 
to sign it. 

KNWD is a student station, run with money from 
media fees. It has a responsibility to be of the highest 
possible professional quality and to train students in 
broadcasting. The format and music are purely the 
decision of the general manager and program 
director. 

Instead of wasting time on a silly petition so the 
radio station will play Michael Jackson instead of new 
wave of jazz, why not put both the time and effort 
towards real change. 

Right now at Northwestern, female students are 
afraid to be in their dorms at night. Every semester, 
one hears stories about rapes, attempted rapes, or 
intrusions occurring in one of the female dorms. 
Recently, a coed resigned from the University after 
waking up to find a male intruder standing over her 
bed. The same man also surprised another girl in the 
shower. We don't petition for the safety of our 
students, but for what records are being played... 

People always complain about the boring campus. 
Do something about it, then. Why not petition for 
better concerts, or for an election to raise fees for 
better services? I've already heard complaints about 
the Christmas concert (Louise Mandrell). Will 
anybody do anything about it? Probably not. 

Surely students banding together for better 
cafeteria food or more dormitory services or com- 
muter privileges would get results: it has on other 
campuses. These are more worthwhile than trying to 
force an improving radio station to change format. 

It's time to, quite frankly, act our age. As adults, we 
should use SGA to its full potential, so Northwestern 
is more like a University. When everyone, black and 
white, Greek and independent, freshmen and grad 
student, bands together, then something will be 
done. Until then, nothing. Or, does anyone care? 



John Ramsey 



Garfield 

by Jim Davis 



HOW WOULP VOO LIKE VOOB. 
BACON PR6.PAR6P, GARFItLP? 




Editor 



Band shows spirit 

"Did you hear the band this weekend?" my friend said to me. 

"No, I missed the game this weekend, " I replied. (The only 
time I have done so, I would like to add.) "Besides, " I continued, 
"what was so special about them Saturday night?" 

"They sounded great. " 

"I'm sure; they have sounded fantastic all semester. Was this 
the first time that you've heard them?" 

"You missed it," she said. "The band played to our side 
Saturday night. They sounded so fine, and I'm talking loud, too. 
We were almost blown away. I just couldn't believe how good 
they really sounded. " 

It figures. The one time that I miss a home football game is the 
one time that the band plays to our side of the stadium. Oh, well, 
I deserve it, (or didn't deserve it, as the case may be.) 

No matter what direction that the band has played this year, 
they have truly sounded spectacular. The Demon marching 
band has lived up to being "The Spirit of Northwestern." 

Maybe it has to do with their size -- it seems that their number 
has almost doubled since last year. For such positive recruiting 
efforts, band director Bill Brent should be commended. 

The band has been dedicated, certainly. They haven't had the 
most pleasant of weather at times. 

Whatever the unknown success ingredient is, I hope it stays 
with them because it has brought pleasing sights and sounds to 
me and many other Northwestern students. 

As a senior, I only wish that there could be just one more 

home game. I wouldn't miss it. ....... 

Lisa Williams 

Letter to the Editor 

Dear Editor 

Attention!! To all the young Black interested students at 
Northwestern. Believe it or not, we are now confronted with 
making a vital decision today. Therefore, as a concerned citizen 
I take the responsibility of informing you of your duty as a 
citizen. I have taken the incentive of letting you know that maybe 
your parents' future, and even your future, rests at the hand of 
simply casting a vote. 

Many of you are aware of the economic status that we are 
now faced with, but with Ronald Reagan back in office our 
conditions will continue to decline. I could go on and on why we 
as young Black college students need to put our democratic 
vote into use. 

Take time out to emphasize to your parents, neighbors and 

friends the importance of voting on November 6. I challenge 

each of you to become actively involved in your future. 

Therefore, the decision is up to you. _ . . 

Dexter Anderson 




John Ramsey 

Editor 

Lisa Williams 

Managing Editor 

Stacy Scroggins 

Business Manager 

Lucy LeBlanc 
Darlene Winslow 

Advertising 

Russel Bienvenu 

Circulation 

Bryan Williams 

Layout 

Robin Gunter 

News 



Sports 

Scott Cox 
Gena Williams 

News Staff 

Warren Tape 

Photographer 

Peter Minder 

Adviser 



Current Sauce is published 
weekly by students of 
Northwestern State 
University of Louisiana. It is 
student-run and financed, 
and is not associated with 
any of the University's 
colleges or departments. 
Staff members are selected 
by the Editor, who is chosen 
by the Student Media Board. 

Editorial and business 
offices are located at Kyser 
Hall 225A. Office hours are 
1-4:30 p.m. Tuesday through 
Friday. The telephone 
number is (31 8) 357-5456. 

All correspondence is 
welcome, and should be 
brought by the office or 
mailed to P.O. Box 5306, 
NSU, Natchitoches, LA 
71497. Deadline for both 
advertising and copy is 1 
p.m. on the Thursday 
preceding Tuesday 
publication. All contributed 
articles must be signed. 

The mail subscription rate 
is $6.00 per semester. 
O rent Sauce is entered as 
S*. jnd class mail in Nat- 
chitoches, LA. USPS number 
140-660. 



Current Sauce 



Northwestern State University 

of Louisiana 

Natchitoches, LA 



November 13, 1984 
Vol. 73, No. 12 





Mandrell Highlights 
Christmas Festival 



by Stephanie Samuels 

Contributor 

Over the years, the 
Christmas Festival Concert 
has been the climax of Nat- 
chitoches' annual light 
fcelebration. This year is no 
|exception. Headlining the 
ivening's entertainment, will 
popular country music star, 
.ouise Mandrell. The concert 
is slated for 8:30 p.m. on Dec. 
|l in Prather Coliseum. It is 
sponsored by the Student 
Activities Board. 
Mandrell began her musical 
career before she could read. 
In junior high she joined older 
Bister, Barbara's group playing 
bass guitar. Before she was 
sixteen she had played every 
major city in the United States 
»d Canada. She had even 
made appearances in Europe. 
It was on the NBC television 
*now, Barbara Mandrell and 
*e Mandrell Sisters, that 
touise gained national at- 
tention. 

Mandrell brings to the stage 
of the coliseum, a live per- 
,or "iance that has been 
"escribed as, "the very best 



example of a female vocalist 
capturing and using the 
'Nashville Sound' to its best 
advantage. No one is any 
better!" The multi-talented 
entertainer plays a slew of 
instruments including the 
saxophone, country bass and 
the fiddle. 

The opening act for this 
year's concert is Robert York. 
The world famous juggler and 
comedian is a former resident 
of Natchitoches now living in 
Oklahoma City. York is one of 
the college entertainment 
circuit's fastest rising stars. 

Tickets for the concert are 
on sale in the Union through 
Nov. 31. 

Tickets can be purchased 
for $2 with ID. Students must 
present the ID on the night of 
the show or pay $12 for a 
day-of-show ticket. 

Students who do not buy 
their ticket by Nov. 31 , may 
purchase a student ticket the 
day of the concert for $5 with 
their ID. Concert tickets can 
be purchased from 1 a.m. - 3 
p.m. daily in Union 157, near 
the Games Area. 



Move Over, CNN 



Sauce gains DC reporter 



The Current Sauce will join 
' an y major newspapers 

jjund the country next spring 

*" en it gains a correspondent 

"Washington, D.C. 
Actually, it won't be quite 

** same. 

J° h n Ramsey, editor, will be 
J: ln 9 his public relations 
(Jjfchip in the nation's 
jr Pl,al as a staff member of A 
Yo es 'dential Classroom for 
^. Un 9 Americans, an 
' abl >sl<5d program for high 

TP* students. 
'9 n scl oolers attending 
* S| aential Classroom not 
tour the city and 



surrounding area, but meet 
with congressmen and their 
peers from around the world. 
Up to twenty governmental 
seminars, featuring am- 
bassadors, lawmakers, and 
famous personalities, among 
others, highlight the program. 
Each week-long session 
(there are nine) is housed in 
the famous Shoreham Hotel in 
Washington. 

While in D.C, Ramsey will 
write both feature stories and 
news items on Louisiana 
politicians and items of in- 
see"DC" 
on page 6 




A Line for Louise 

Students line up outside the ticket office last week to 
purchase Louise Mandrell concert tickets. Mandrell will 
perform for the Natchitoches Christmas Festival on 
December 1 . 

Faust: Loans Now Easier To Get 



A change in student loan 
programs should make future 
loans easier for students to 
get, according to Terry Faust, 
director of financial aid. 

"This change in student 
loans is the biggest financial 
aid change this year," said 
Faust. "We're using the same 
program used by USL, Tech, 
Northeast and most other 
universities. It will reduce the 
turn-around time of a loan from 
6-8 weeks to just two weeks." 

The change in program is 
NSU's addition of the Higher 
Education Assistance Fund 
(HEAF), of Charleston, W.V. 
This will now be available in 
addition to the Guaranteed 
Student Loan (GSL) program, 
which is used in conjunction 
with local banks. The HEAF 
uses a West Virginia bank. 

"The problem with GSL's is 



that local banks just don't 
support them," said Faust. "In 
Natchitoches, only First Bank 
will lend money to approved 
students. In some places, like 
Leesville, there is no bank that 
participates in the program." 

"This fall, many students 
using the GSL reported waits 
of 6-8 weeks for their money 
to arrive at Northwestern. With 
this new company, we'll cut 
that time by as much as two- 
thirds," commented Faust. 

In addition to the GSL and 
HEAF, both 8 percent interest 
loans, the National Direct 
Student Loan (NDSL) is 
available to eligible students. 

The NDSL is federally-backed 
(5 percent interest), and is 



Demons ranked 

NSU received word on 
Monday that the Demon 
football team is ranked no. 
16 by the NCAA ranking 
committee. 



based on need. Students must 
use the Application for 
Federal Student Aid, the same 
used for Pell Grants, etc., to 
apply for the loan. 

All three loan programs 
require payment beginning no 
more than one year after 
graduation. 

"We're excited about this 
new program," he said. 
"Instead of having to send 
j papers to Baton Rouge for 
approval, they're sent by us 
(NSU financial aid office) 
directly to West Virginia. The 
money will be back much 
faster. It will really help the 
students out." 

"And that's what we're here 
for," said Faust. 

For further information call 
financial aid at 357-5961 . 



STUDENT 
AMBASSADORS 

Thursday 

3:30 
Union 321 





Demons 
Battle 
SFA 

See page 9 



I 



November 1 3, 1 984 CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73, No. 1 2 



News 



Senator Long To Serve as Grand Marshall 



Senator Russell B. Long will 
serve as the Grand Marshal for 
the Natchitoches Christmas 
Festival's main parade at 2 
p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 1 . 

The selection of Long, who 
has served in the Senate since 

Two join 
Music 
Faculty 

This semester the music 
department has had two new 
exciting additions to the piano 
faculty. Doctor Robert Watson 
and Dr. William Davis. 

Watson received his 
doctorate from the University 
of Arizona and has taught at 
Simpson College in San 
Fransico. 

He now enjoys living in 
Natchitohees, where he says, 
"students are more friendly 
and respectful than in 
California - I feel welcomed, it 
is very pleasant here." 

Watson plans to have a 
piano faculty recital to let 
students hear their teachers' 
See "Faculty" on page 4 



1948 and now ranks second 
in seniority among the 100 
senators, was announced 
recently by festival co- 
chairmen Dr. and Mrs. Richard 
Galloway. 
Assistant Majority Leader of 



the Senate from 1 965 through 
1 968, Long served as 
chairman of the Senate 
Finance Committee and of the 
Surface Transportation 
Subcommittee of the Com- 
merce Committee until the 




New Instructors 

Dr. Robert Watson (left) and Dr. William Davis are the two 
newest additions to the music faculty. Both teach piano. 




The Student Government 
Association was called to order bv 
Shawn Wyble at 6 p.m. Seventeen 
senators were present. Those 
members of SGA absent were: Jon 
Mouser, Dave Decuir. Tommy Moore, 
John Sacker (WCC). Lori Peterson 
(ADOS), and Mignona Cote. 
OFFICER REPORTS 
Shawn Wyble (vice president) an- 
nounced that the Constitution would 
not be voted on this semester 
because there is not sufficient time 
left m the semester to have the 
revised Constitution printed in the 
Current Sauce for three consecutive 
weeks. 

Tod Klotzbach (president) warned 
those members of SGA who were 
slacking off on keeping their office 
hours. He announced that SGA would 
participate in a Thanksgiving food 
drive, if everyone was willing to 
participate. As far as the SGA Easter 
trip was concerned, Tod said that the 
committee is responsible for the trip, 
not him and the committee needs to 
elect a chairperson at the next 
meeting which will be held in the SGA 
office prior to the SGA meeting. Paula 
Simmons suggested that if enough 
money is not made, the money which 
is earned should be donated to a 
charity Tod asked for a motion to be 
made in new business concerning us 
(SGA) grading ourselves once a 
month. Those members of SGA with 
the highest "gpa" at the end of the 
school year will receive an award. Tod 
announced that SGA has ap- 
proximately eight thousand dollars left 
in the budget He said that he would 
like to use some for a Christmas party 



and some to upgrade the SGA office. 
DIRECTOR REPORTS 

Sharon Sampite (External Affairs 
Committee) announced that they 
would be assisting the Easter trip 
committee. They would also meet at 5 
p.m on Mondays. 

Shawn Wyble (Internal Affairs 
Committee) asked for senate approval 
of Jodi Werfal as SAB representative. 

Tim Jacobs (SAB representative) 
announced that the Student Activities 
Board was now taking preliminary 
sketches for the Christmas Window 
Contest. The entry fee is ten dollars 
($10.00). 
OLD BUSINESS 

Em Matthews (Traffic and Safety 
Committee) reported that the six 
parking spaces in front of the IET 
Building were to be used by faculty 
members only. The committee is in 
the process of researching how many 
faculty members park in front of 
Williamson Hall. Those parking 
spaces not utilized by faculty 
members will be left for use by the 
students. The committee listened to 
appeals concerning traffic tickets the 
committee also discussed the parking 
spaces located in the Field House 
parking lot. Those parking spaces are 
reserved for faculty and staff only. 

Em Matthews reported that the 
Natchitoches Central FBLA would not 
be able to take time off from school to 
do their project on campus. She 
asked suggestions from SGA during 
new business. 
NEW BUSINESS 

Paula Simmons moved to accept 
Jodi Werfal as the SAB represen- 
tative. Dan Kratz seconded the 



motion. Motion passed. Vote was 
taken by a show of hands. 

Rhonda Leydecker moved to initiate 
grading all members of SGA once a 
month. Beth McMillan seconded. 
Motion passed. 

Tim Jacobs moved to swear in Lisa 
Jan Bryant, Jerome Cox, and Cathy 
Ernst as Supreme Court members. 
Dan Kratz seconded. Motion passed. 
Tod Klotzbach proceeded to swear 
them in. 

Rhonda Leydecker moved to open 
the floor for suggestions on how to 
use the excess money in the SGA 
budget. Tim Jacobs seconded. The 
following suggestions were approved 
by the SGA for office betterment: 
working typewriter, chair/desk for 
outer office, Apple computer, trophy 
case, and updating the Mr. and Miss 
NSU pictures. The following 
suggestions were approved by the 
SGA for a major project (listed in 
decreasing number of votes): 
electronic marquee, cable television 
or satellite television, and student 
discount cards. Tim Jacobs moved 
that if the first suggestion was not 
feasible to attempt accomplishing the 
next in line. Rhonda Leydecker 
seconded. Motion passed. 

Jim Martin moved to open the floor 
for suggestions to give to the Nat- 
chitoches FBLA for their project. Tim 
Jacobs seconded. The following 
suggestions were given (listed in 
decreasing number of votes): campus 
clean-up, campus survey, recruiting 
for NSU, and painting a mural in the 
SGA office. 

Submitted by Cindy Ernst 
Secretary 



Republican Party won a 
majority of the Senate seats in 
1981. 

In a survey of members of 
Congress conducted in 1 982 
by U.S. News and World 
Report, Long's colleagues 
ranked him as the most in- 
fluential and the most per- 
suasive Democrat in the 
Senate. 

Similar 1 982 polls ' con- 
ducted by The Washingtonian 
magazine and the Public 
Broadcasting Systems 
national program, "The 
Lawmakers," ranked Long as 
the "Most Respected 
Senator" and the "Best 
Senate Debater" respectively. 

Senator Robert Dole of 
Kansas, who succeeded Long 
as chairman of the Finance 
Committee, said Long's power 
"derives from his absolute 
command of the field of 
finance." He later said, 



"Russell Long knows mora 
about the tax code than all of 
us combined." 

Among Long's legislative 
achievements are the land 
mark 1 972 and 1 976 federal 
revenue-sharing laws and the 
1975, 1977 and 1978 tax 
cuts. He also pushed for 
adoption of the $1 checkoff 
plan to help finance 
presidential elections and 
lessen the influence of major 
contributors on the govern- 
ment. 

Long is a graduate of the 
LSU Law School and was 
admitted to the Louisiana Bar 
in 1942. He served as 
executive counsel to his 
uncle, Gov. Earl Long, before 
being elected to be Senate. 

Long, a U.S. Navy officer in 
World War II, is the son of the 
late Huey P. Long, who was 
governor of Louisiana and a 
U.S. Senator. 



SRJDENffi 




LIVE! 



Fri. and Sat. 
Admission $3.00 



Vol. 73, No. 1 2 CURRENT SAUCE November 1 3, 1 984 



News 




Students take PFM's 
Van for campus ride 



It's not a 'vette, but... 

Last week, two students stole the PFM van from the Union and took it on a joyride which 
ended in Chaplin's Lake near the farm. Despite the comments on the van's side, the 
students were not members of either of the two fraternities. 



by Lisa Williams 

Managing Editor 

Charges are not being filed 
against two students 
responsible for an incident of 
theft and vandalism which 
climaxed with a vehicle being 
driven into Chaplin's Lake. 

According to University 
Police reports, a van 
belonging to Professional 
Food Management was taken 
without authorization at ap- 
proximately 12:50 a.m. Nov. 
1 . The vehicle was later found 
driven into Chaplin's Lake. 

Two witnesses, graduate 
students Archie Anderson and 
Beth Ann Hendrix, notified 
University Police that they had 
seen the van speeding down 
Sam Sibley Drive and another 



Entertainers Schedule Auditions 



The NSU Entertainers will 
hold open auditions for 
several positions on Wed- 
nesday, Dec. 5 from 3 until 5 , 



p.m. in Russell Hall. Those one rhythm/lead guitarist, and 

spots open for audition include one horn player (saxophone or 

one male lead vocalist, one trumpet preferred.) 

female lead/back-up vocalist, Those students wishing to 



Accessories 

For That Finishing Touch 



Lewis' Has Them All — 

•Fashion Jewelry from carved animal necklaces and chunky "fun" 

jewelry to classic pearls. 
•Belts, Buckles, Sashes, "to tie it all together." 
•Scarves in challis and silky fabrics from bold and dramatic to 

subdued pastels. 

•Shawls, Mufflers, Knit Hats and Scarf Sets — large selection in 

a variety of colors. 
•Round-The-Clock Pantyhose in fashion colors. 

Ideal For Christmas Gifts 



One-Stop Shopping For Accessories — 
Style & Quality & Affordable Prices 



l /3 0ff 



Selected Items Of Early Fall 
Junior And Misses Separates. 



Lewis 9 

the friendly store" 



Jolene Anders, Inc. 
105 Williams Ave. 
Near 

Broadmoor Shopping Center 



audition should come to 
Russell Hall with sheet music 
to a orepared Top 40/Pop 
song. The applicant should be 
ready to sing and/or play lead 
on his selected tune. In ad- 
dition, he should be prepared 
to sing back-up on a song, and 
to participate in a group 
choreographed movement 
exercise. 



Further information and a 
current Entertainers song list 
can be obtained by contacting 
the director, Leigh Wood 
Johnson, at the Office of 
External Affairs, 357-441 4. 



Those students selected 
will be awarded a $500 
scholarship for the spring 
semester. This amount will be 
paid directly to the student in 
monthly increments of $1 25. 

Any students interested in 
the auditions should keep in 
mind the following criteria: 

Student must be enrolled 
during the spring 1 985 
semester as a full time 
student. (Transfer students, 
incoming spring freshman, and 
currently enrolled students 
only are eligible.) 

One must have an overall 
and last semester grade point 
average of 2.0. 

Student must have ability to 
travel with the group at all 
times, i.e. freedom from 
conflicts in scheduling. 



automobile was following 
closely behind. The witnesses 
were able to get a license 
plate number of the car and 
police contacted the owner to 
which it is registered here on 
campus, John Ward Lever. 

Lever, who told University 
Police that he had not been 
driving his car Wednesday 
night, admitted that he had 
loaned his car to the other two 
subjects. 

The students involved in the 
incident, Robert Tripplett and 
Tully Thornton, "were given an 
option of paying for the 
damages or having charges 
pressed against them, said 
Linda Nichols, manager of the 
Union Cafeteria. They both 
have agreed to pay, but we 
don't know the extent of the 
damages."' 

The stolen van was 
retrieved from Chaplin's Lake 
and had "F— Kappa Sigma, 
KA Number 1 " spray painted 
on one side. The two students 
are not members of either 
fraternity. 

The incident "obviously 
showed terrible judgement," 
said Dr. Fred Bosarge, dean of 
students. He went on to say 
that the incident was also 
serious because it could have 
caused physical injury. 

"The student involvement 
will be handled as individual 
voilations of the Code ol 
Conduct," Bosarge com- 
mented. "PFM doesn't intenc 
to press charges if restitutior 
is made." 

One of the subjects ha: 
been suspended indefinitely 
from the University," he said. 



CC Team 
Fourth 



The Cross Country team 
currently ranks fourth in the 
GSC. 

Ronald Wilkins, placing 
18th, was the top NSU 
finisher in the recent Gulf Star 
championship, the con- 
ference's first ever. The meet 
was held on Stephen F. 
Austin's track in 
Nacogdoches, TX. 

Other Demons placing 
Russell Duty, 19; Chris 
Maggio, 2 1; "Philip 
Anousakes, 31; Dean 
Johnson, 36; and Rafael 
Ramirez, 38. 



November 1 3, 1 984 CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73, No. 1 2 



News 



News 
Briefs 



MAGGIO SELECTED 
AS K.A. PRESIDENT 

Chris Maggio has been 
elected the president of the 
KA Chapter for the 1 984-85 
year. Serving with him will be 
Bill Welch, vice-president and 
Darryl Miley, recording 
secretary. 

Currently NSU's Kappa 
Alpha Order has 21 active 
members and 22 pledges. 

TRI-BETA MEETS 
WEDNESDAY 

The Tri-Beta honor biology 
club's next meeting will be 
Wednesday, at 5:15 in 
Biology Building 215. 



continued from page 2 

talent. He enjoys performing, 
but says his favorite thing is 
standing ovations. 

Classical is the form he 
plays best on piano, oboe and 
recorder, but he is open 
minded to other types of 
music. 

Watson feels that all NSU 
students should attend 
student recitals. 

"Alot of people have never 
heard their fellow students 
perform or even been in the 
recital hall or seen and heard 
the pipe organ," he said. 

Dr. William Davis received 
his undergraduate degree 
from Eastern Illinois University 
and his higher degrees from 
the University of Iowa. He also 
taught as assistant professor 
of piano at Queen's College in 



TRI-SIGMA SPONSORS 
HARVEST DANCE 

Sigma Sigma Sigma 
sorority's pledge class 
sponsored the annual Harvest 
Dance Friday, Nov. 9. En- 
tertainment was provided by 
Party Time from Monroe. A 
pre-Harvest Dance bonfire and 
cookout was held at member 
Susan Williamsom's house. 

Tri-Sigma held initiation on 
Nov. 5. Newly initiated 
members are Chrissey Bailey, 
Lisa Elkins, Linda Doll, Kathey 
Jackson, Yvette Jordan, Paula 
Woodall, Paula Loe, Cindy 
McAbee, Krisit Peeples, Patti 
Smiley, Charlotte Zumwalt, 
Paula Ray, Lisa Seeger, 
Tracey Fisher and Gena Kay 
Williams. 

Tri-Sigmas attended a 
"Favorite Hero" exchange 
with Kappa Sigma on Oct. 24 
and a "Favorite Monster" 
exchange with Tau Kappa 
Epsilon on Halloween night. 



Faculty 



Charlotte, N.C. 

Davis wanted to teach at a 
larger university than Queen's, 
that is why he is here now. He 
finds the university, its 
students and faculty helpful 
and friendly, but finds it hard to 
adjust to a small town. 

Davis enjoys performing on 
the piano and violin, but would 
rather practice violin, 
"because it is easier." 

Davis teaches classical 
piano to nearly 20 students. "I 
was trained to teach classical 
music, but I have great 
respect for jazz musicians. In 
my class we play both older 
classical and contemporary 
classical." 

Their main goals are to 
attract new students to the 
campus, and building an even 
stronger and better music 
dept. 



YOUR FNI ALTERNATIVE, 91 .7 KNWD 

EVERY DAY... 

NEWS BUMPS at 1 , 4, 8, & 1 1 p 

EARTH NEWS at 1 30, 5:30, 8:30, & 10:30 
11/13 TUESDAY 

TWO FER TUESDAY • Double plays all day 

MARY TURNERS OFF THE RECORD • Pat Benetar 
, 4:00-5:00 
11/14 WEDNESDAY 

KNWD's ALBUM SHOWCASE ■ 8:00-8:45p 
11(15 THURSDAY 

BOB DYLAN SPECIAL • (indepth interview with music) 
8:00-10:30p 

11(18 SUNDAY 

SUPERSTAR CONCERT • Eddie Money 

8:00-9:30 

DR. DEMENTO (2 hours of hilarious and unusual music) 
1 0:00-1 2:00mid. 

ALSO KEEP USTENING FOR DETAILS ON HOW YOU 

CAN WIN AN INDASH STEREO! 

PLUS MOVIE PASSES GIVEN AWAY REGULARLY! 

TICKETS TO THE RICK SPRINGFIELD/COREY 

HART CONCERT 



Members Michaela Sampite 
and Cindy McAbee were 
selected for Pom Pon Line. 

Mignona Cote, Carla 
Gomez, Donna Jo Kelly, 
Eileen Haynes, Sharon 
Sampite and Stacie Lafitte 
were named to "Who's Who 
Among Students of American 
Colleges and Universities." 

PROFESSORS PRESENT 
PAPERS 

Four professors from the 
College of Nursing presented 



papers at the fourth annual 
nursing research conference 
Friday and Saturday, in Dallas, 
Tex. 

The conference in Dallas 
was sponsored by the 
Southern Council on 
Collegiate Education for 
Nursing and the Texas 
Women's University College 
of Nursing. It will focus on 
nursing research as a 
diagnostic approach in nursing 
education, administration and 
practice. 



A.K.A. INITIATES THREE 

Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority 
has initiated three young 
ladies to their fall '84 pledge 
club. They are as follows: 

Frances E. Beasley, 
president; Monte' M. John- 
son, treasurer; Regina J. 
Travers, secretary. 

The sorority members along 
with their new pledges 
sponsored a window wash last 
Friday to raise funds for future 
activities. 



Ener 



A Pre-requisite on Every Job Resume. 





What does it take to get 
a good job these days? A good education is a 
necessity. Experience certainly helps. Intel- 
ligence. A willingness to learn. Ambition to 
get to the top. The ability to get along with 
people. And energy, because without energy 
there just wouldn't be any jobs to fill. In order 
to supply that energy, electric companies must 
take advantage of the most up-to-date tech- 
nology, build facilities as efficient as possible 
and make full use of every available energy 
source including nuclear power and coal. 
Energy. You need it to get a job. 



LOUISIANA'S INVESTOR-OWNED 
ELECTRIC COMPANIES 

- INVESTING IN YOUR ENERGY FUTURE 



Central Louisiana Electnc Company / Gulf States Utilities Company / Louisiana Power & Light Company 
New Orleans Public Service Inc. / Southwestern Electric Power Company 



GRADUATE 

to the rich, smooth taste of Michelob£Light 




November 1 3, 1 984 CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73, No. 12 




News 



'Scrooge ' Opens In Two Weeks 



Bah Humbug 

Molly Bernard, Stephen Speights, and John Hatley 
practice their roles in the upcoming NSU production of 
"Scrooge." The play will run Dec. 7-8 in the A.A. Fredericks 
Center Auditorium. 

As usual, NSU students will be admitted free with ID. 

Chamber Theatre 
Presentation Set 



Students are invited to 
attend a performance by the 
Chamber Theatre' Company in 
a presentation of The Eye 
Alone - III. 

The Eye Alone - III will be 
presented on Nov. 1 3, 1 4 and 
15 at 7:30 p.m. in Theatre 
West of the A.A. Fredericks 
Center. 

The material will represent a 



disparate cast of authors- 
such as Robert Frost, Nikki 
Giovanni^ James Thurber, 
William * Saroyan, Jamaica 
Kincaid, Margery Williams 
Marianne Moore. 

As usual, student ad- 
mittance is by ID. Non-NSU 
student admission is $2 and 
general admission is $4. 



The second annual 
production of Scrooge, 
adapted from Charles Dickens 
A Christmas Carol will be 
performed on Dec. 7-8 at 
7:30 p.m. With two matinees 
for elementary school children 
on the 7th at 10 a.m. and 1 
p.m. 

The production is com- 
pletely student directed and 
run. There is a cast of about 
50 people from Northwestern, 
LA School and the com- 
munity. 

The story is about Scrooge 
and the changes he needs to 
go through to change from the 
old mean miser to the loving 
man that he once was. 

This musical is light hearted 
and runs for about one hour, 
with songs, dances, jokes and 
a touching story. 

The main character is played 
by Ryan Horton Jr. (second 
year playing this role). Some 
of the other characters are 
Bob Cratchet, played by 
Stephen Speights; Ethel 
Cratchet, Betsy Corley, 
Kathy, Molly Bernard; Tiny 
Tim, John Hatley; Christmas 
Present, Robert Cry; Marley, 
Britt Solano; Christmas Past, 
Elaina Verret, and Christmas 
Future, Scott Cooley. 

The director is Keith Woods, 
senior. Assistant director is 
Melanie Lea, sophomore. The 
choregraphy is by Becky 
Maxey, graduate student. 
Technical director is Michael 



DC 



continued from page 1 

terest to Northwestern 
students. 

Obviously, Ramsey can not 
continue as editor for the 
spring semester. Lisa 
Williams, editor in 1983-84, 
will assume the duties once 
again, pending approval of the 
Student Media Board. 

As always, the Current 
Sauce is in need of staff 
members for next semester. 
Mass Communications credit 
for up to three semester hours 
is available. 

"Anyone who is interested 
should contact me or Mr. 
Minder (advisor) as soon as 
possible," said Williams. "We 
need writers for news, 
features, and sports. Non- 
journalism majors are en- 
couraged to apply, too." 

Current Sauce offices are 
located in Kyser Hall 225A. 
The phone number is 357- 
5456. 



U.S.News & World Report presents 

News.Waves 




News waves? They're the trends of today — in politics, business, youth, the 
economy — that affect what's to come next month, next year, in the next decade. 

News waves in U.S.News: We analyze them every week (before they 
make the headlines elsewhere) to keep you on top of — and prepared for — 
what the future holds in store. 

Subscribe to U S News at half-price. Just fill out and send in the coupon 
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Atkins. 

"Everyone is really backing 
us - the Music, Theatre, Art 
and Dance Department Plus 
the community." says Woods. 

Added Lea, "We still need 
people to help with the set and 



sing in the chorus - guys 
mainly. If anyone is interested 
they can contact the Theatre 
Dept. office or come to a 

rehearsal from 5:30 - 7:30 
Monday through Friday." 



Charity Bowl 1984 

Kappa Sigma vs. TKE 

December 5, 1984 
Turpin Stadium 
Admission $1.00 - all proceeds 
go to charity 



GET INVOLVED THIS SPRING 

TAKE A COURSE IN THE 

LIFETIME SPORTS . HEALTH 
AND FITNESS PROGRAM: 

★ GOLF ★PERSONAL FITNESS 

★ SWIMMING ★ SKIN AND SCUBA 

★ WATER SAFETY *RACQUETBALL 
★TENNIS ★BAIT CASTING 

★ BOWLING ★ WHITEWATER CANOEING 




Any two-hour course from the 
•Lifetime Sports, Health and 
Fitness Program will satisfy 
CORE requirements for health 
and personal fitness. 

Do something challenging — 
Get credit — Have fun doing it!! 

Call: Department of Health, 

I Physical Education, 
and Recreation 
357-5127 forn 



more information. ^ 



3*K 



Vol. 73, No. 1 2 CURRENT SAUCE November 1 3, 1 984 



News 



Band Adds To Northwestern Pride, Spirit 



by Suzie Nevels 

Contributor 

"Hang onto your seats, 
Demon fans, here comes the 
'Spirit of Northwestern' 



marching band!" 

This announcement, familiar 
to all football game spectators, 
says it all. 

This year has been 



tremendous for the marching 
band, which has proved 
capable of braving even 
through stormy weather to 
perform at football games and 



pep rallies. 

The enthusiasm they give 
comes naturally, as one might 
observe at a band rehearsal. In 
fact, enthusiasm is probably 



Monday Night Special 



Draft 
Choice 




Monday Night Football is back! And Mr. Gattis is 
making a good deal even better. Buy any large pizza and 
pitcher of beer, and get your second pitcher FREE! 

With big-screen TV, cold beer and the best pizza in town, you 
can't lose — no matter which team wins. 



Make your draft choice at Mr. Gattis this Monday 

to have a great time. 



Natchitoches 



it's a great way 



123 Hwy. 1 South 
357-1135 



The best pizza in town.fff«^ r / 




what makes it all work. "I like 
the way the band gets fired up 
at the games and to listen to 
the crowd while performing." 
says Kenneth Crocker a 
computer-science major. 

With 150 members, 23 of 
them are Louisiana School 
students, the band has 
doubled since last year, and 
comprises of a variety of 
people. Ken Stephens, a 
psychology major replies, "I 
love being a part of a band that 
is definitely on the move up." 

"It is an addiction and an 
honor to be in a college band 
as good as Northwestern's," 
said Shelley Harvill. 

Not only do hugs abound, 
but someone is always there 
to lend a hand, or a shoulder if 
necessary, words of en- 
couragement are plentiful. 
Members feel like the band is 
one big family. "U'-.e having 
our own sorority and frater- 
nity." states Ka'( • Kinberger, 
aspeech-hearihy mjjor. 

Much o. the excitement 
about a band performance lies 
with the addition of a new 
feature twirler, Cindy McAbee 
of Fort Recovery, Ohio. Not 
only is she nationally 
recognized, but is quite 
dedicated to her twirling, 
which was evident as she 
twirled in the rain, while the 
bands were confined to the 
stadium at the State Fair 
Game. 

The band's entertainment 
quality is rounded out with 
inclusion of the flag corp, six 
glittering majorettes and the 
glamorous Cane River Belles 
dance line. What show would 
be complete without them? 

Bill Brent, Director of Bands, 
remarks that the students from 
all of the areas of the band are 
very cooperative and talented. 
They put in a lot of hard work 
and it always pays off in the 
end. 

Pineville and Shreveport 
were the last to house band 
performances. "The Spirit of 
Northwestern" served as an 
exhibition performance while 
judges tallied scores of high 
school bands. The band 
travels next to Nacogdoches, 
Texas, to root the Demons to 
victory and an undisputed 
GSC championship. 

"It ; 3 a pleasure to be in 
band; there are ups and 
downs but it would be hard for 
me to give it up if I ever had 
to!" remarks Jill Blake, a 
chemistry major. 



HOMECOMING KING 





BUDWEISER ■•KING Of BEERS- -ANHEUSERBUSCH INC -ST LOUIS 



Vol. 73, No. 1 2 CURRENT SAUCE November 1 3, 1 984 




Sports 



Demons Clinch GSC Tie, 
Face SFA This Weekend 



Maybe they were at home 
watching TV. 

Or maybe they were at the 
World's Fair during its last 
weekend, or were just tired of 
watching their team lose. 

Whatever the excuse, 
Southeastern fans were not in 
Hammond's Strawberry 
Stadium for Saturday's clash 
with Northwestern. 

An NSU season-low crowd 
estimated at just 4,000 
watched the Demons open up 
a big lead, let SLU come back, 
then blow it open for good. 

The end result is the fact 
that the Demons clinched a tie 
for the Gulf Star Conference 
championship. Northwestern 
wins the title outright with a 
triumph this weekend against 
rival Stephen F. Austin in 
Nacogdoches, TX. 

After a scoreless first 
quarter, the 7-3 Demons got 



GSC Standings 

Northwestern 4-0 (7-3) 

Nicholls State 3-1 (5-5) 

Southwest Texas 2-2 (7-3) 

Sam Houston 2-2 (7-3) 

Stephen F. Austin 0-3-1(6-3-1) 

Southeastern LA 0-3-1(2-7-1) 

on the scoreboard first. 

An early-second period 
touchdown from Wayne Van 
to Gerard Henry covered 30 
yards, and Benny Brouilette's 
kick gave Northwestern a lead 
't would never again give up, 
7-0. 

The Lion offense was un- 
productive, and just two 
Minutes later the Demons 
were again in business. The 
football was again sent via 
Wayne Van Express - air mail. 
This time, the receiver was 
Odessa Turner, and 34 yards 
ater the Demons were again in 
h e end zone. After the kick, 
N SU led 1 4-0. 

After their team was shut out 
tn e first half, many Lion fans 
exited the stadium at in- 
mission. Too bad, for the 
j IOn s had some offense 
^cked away for the second 

. ^ u t it would have to wait, 
^cause NSU had a few more 
itensive fireworks to show. 
s Fr eshman sensation John 
£ e Phens, moved to tailback 
, the SLU game, scampered 
d yards before being brought 

SLU2 by Kerchal Byrd at the 
^ ne third period's first 



points, a 2-yard run by Ron 
Haggerty, was the next play. 
Brouillette hit another one, and 
the Demons had increased 
their lead to 21-0. 

Southeastern answered on 
their next possession, as 
quarterback Charles Hebert 
came alive. 

Hebert moved SLU 
downfield 67 yards in five 
plays, down to the NSU 8. 
Lion star Jerry Butler, the 
GSC's leading running back, 
brought it to the 3 on the next 
play. He followed it with a run 
to the right that brought him to 
the NSU end zone, cutting the 
NSU margin to 21 -7. 

On the next NSU 
possession, the Lion defense 
played like their offense, and 
forced a short kick by Demon 
punter Mike Crow. 

Southeastern took over at 
the NSU 47, and Hebert again 
went to work, putting the 
Lions over the goalline in just 
four plays. The kick was 
good, and the nation's number 
one scoring defense had just 
given up 14 quick points. 

The Demons, behind Van, 
again engineered a long drive 
to eat time off the clock. They 



stalled in SLU territory, 
however, and settled for a 27- 
yard field goal by Brouillette. 

In the fourth quarter, it was 
all Northwestern. 

The Demon defense 
stopped SLU cold, and Van 
and company took over from 
the NSU 44. 

Six plays later, the Demons 
were on the Lion 31. Van 
pitched to Elliot Dawson on 
the option, and Dawson took it 
from there. Touchdown. The 
extra point was good, and 
NSU increased its margin to 
31-14. Most remaining 
Southeastern fans left, while 
the large purple-clad group 
under the press box was 
loving every minute... 

NSU finished scoring with a 
40-yarder by Brouillette. This 
game the Demons a 34-14 
win. 

Should this year's 

Demons win the GSC title and 
beat SFA for an 8-3 season, 
NSU may receive an NCAA at- 
large playoff berth. Even if 
they don't, they will still have 
NSU's best record since 
1 980, when Northwestern 
finished in the l-AA Top 20 
with an 8-3 mark. 



Scoreboard 



Louisiana Tech 34, Texas-Arlington 

The 'Dogs won their 8th Southland championship in 1 4 years 
by crushing UTA in Ruston. Tech is 7-4, and earned a playoff 
berth with the win. 

LSU 16, Alabama 14 

For the first time since 1 968, the Tigers may be in the Sugar 
Bowl. LSU, 7-1 -1 , is tied with Florida atop the SEC. 

Nicholls 30, Southwest Texas 14 

Should Northwestern lose, Nicholls can still tie the Demons for 
the GSC title. Nicholls is 3-1 in the conference, and plays SLU 
on Saturday. 

North Texas State 1 0, Northeast 3 

In Denton, TX, the Eagles ruined NLU's playoff hopes with an 
upset win that gave Tech the SLC crown. NLU is now 7-3. 

McNeese30, USL17 

An over-capacity crowd of over 23,000 was on hand as the 
Cowboys cruised past rival Southwestern in Lake Charles. 

Southern Mississippi 31, East Carolina 27 

The Eagles rebounded from a loss to NSU to bomb the Pirates 
in Greenville, N.C. 

Pittsburgh 21 , Tulane 1 

Coach Wally English returned to his ole stomping grounds - 
Pitt - but one of his recruits scored two TD's to beat the Wave. 




Butterfingers 

Orlando Thrash bobbles the ball during Saturday's GSC 
clash with Southeastern in Hammond. Thrash held on to the 
football, giving NSU a first down. 

Ladies Place Second 



The recently formed Lady 
Demons received 51 total 
points to finish second behind 
Northeast at the Louisiana 
Tech Lady Techster Cross 
Country Invitational Oct. 26. 

Sandra Mitchell of NLU 
finished the 3.1 mile course in 
19:28 edging out Chris 
Jasek, also of NLU, by only 5 
seconds. Garnering top 
honors for NSU was Margaret 
Gies with a clocking of 22:30 
over the extremely hilly but 
fast Ruston course. Just 
behind Gies was Lori Frances, 



also of NSU. Gies, a graduate 
education major, and Frances 
a second year nursing student 
have finished one and two for 
NSU since the second race of 
the season. 

Other top finishers for NSU 
were Lisa Breazeale at 23:40, 
Sherry Waggoner at 24:18, 
Christine Ford at 26:09 and 
Margaret Hennigan at 26:57. 
Fianl Results: 

1 . Northeast - 1 5 

2. Northwestern - 51 

3. LA Tech - 72 



Gulf Star To Feature 
'Unusual' Basketball 



Basketball competition in the 
Gulf Star Conference this year 
will be unusual, to say the 
least. The league has four 
members in NCAA Division I. 
But not all schools are in the 
same class; Sam Houston and 
Stephen F. Austin remain 
NCAA Division II schools. 

Wayne Yates, head coach, 
suggested a plan which was 
accepted, a plan to alleviate 
problems, since the NCAA 
limits the number of games 
that schools in different 



classes can play each other. 

Yates' plan says that the two 
Division II schools will play two 
confe/ence games - against 
each other and against 
Southwest Texas - that will 
count as a game-and-a-half 
toward their GSC record. 

Nicholls, NSU and SLU will 
play each conference member 
twice. 

This problem will be 
alleviated next season, when 
all six Gulf Star schools will be 
Division I participants. 



Northwestern (7-3) at Stephen F. Austin (6-3-1) 



Mascot: Demons 

Enrollment: 6,178 

Colors: Purple, white, and orange 

Location: Natchitoches, LA 

Founded: 1884 
Conference: Gulf Star 
Affiliation: NCAA Div. I-AA 
1983 record: 4-7 




vs 




Mascot: . Lumberjacks 

Enrollment: 12,522 
Colors: Purple and White 
Location: Nacogdoches, TX 
Founded: 1923 
Conference: Gulf Star 
Affiliation: NCAA Div. I-AA 
1983 record: 7-4 



7 p.m., Lumberjack Stadium 
Nacogdoches, Texas 



Student Profile 

Paula Simmons 



Paula Simmons is a junior 
physical education history 
major from Pollock, where she 
lives with her two younger 
brothers - Thomas (a 
sophomore at Louisiana 
College), Ralph (junior high), 
and her parents. 

Paula is very close to her 
brothers, so she misses them 
alot. But, she loves NSU and 
feels that she belongs. 

Since she's a P.E. major 
Paula is involved with sports 
and intramural events. She 
works as a secretary in the 
P.E. department and also 
officiates for all the intramural 
events: 

Her favorite sports to coach 
are basketball and track. She 
also enjoys participating with 
Sigma Kappa Sorority in in- 
tramurals. 

As third vice-president 
(Rush Chairman) of Sigma 
Kappa, she has much 
responsibility and stays very 
busy. 

Paula is also in the Purple 
Jackets honorary womens 
organization, Delta Psi Kappa 
and SGA Junior Class 
Senator. 

Paula said, "I am really 
proud to be involved in NSU. 
Sigma Kappa is very important 
in my life. Being a Purple 
Jacket is the highest honor for 
women that can be achieved 
on this campus, and SGA has 
been improving 100 percent. 
The officers are fantastic. 



Shawn Wyble is well 
respected and looked up to 
and Tod Klotzbach never 
stops -- he never lets SGA 
stop. I feel honored to be a 
part of it." 

Paula has been honored not 
only by being elected as rush 
chairman and junior class 
senator but for being most 
dependable in her sorority. 

Paula expects to continue 
being involved and graduate in 
good standing with a B.A. She 
then wants to coach in 
Louisiana or Texas at a high 
school, while working on her 
masters. 

In about ten years I plan to 
settle down and eventually 
have three children." 

"I want to work with Special 
Olympics. I feel there is a 
shortage of people who care 
enough to coach or get really 
involved. I am able to walk and 
run normally; I'd like to give 
them a chance," she said. 

VB Squad 
Now 0-20 

The Demon Volleyball squad 
remains winless, not only in 
Gulf Star action but also in all 
games. The ladies are 0-5 in 
the conference and 0-20 
overall after dropping a 
heartbreaker last week to non- 
conference opponent Mc- 
Neese State, 16-14, 15-3 
16-14. 



Classifieds 



FOR SALE: Registered Tennessee 
walking horses. Stallion, mares, 
gelding, weanling colts. 31 8 872-2476. 

FREE! FREE! FREE! FREE! Student Gift 
Pax's, male and female, come by the 
Student Activities Office, Union 21 4. 

FROM ONE SPOTTER TO ANOTHER 

thanks for another season! 

FLOWER BANDIT: Thanks for making 
my day! You're Super! 

SIGMA ALPHA IOTA, University of Yang 
members: turn in your organizational 
card or forfeit University priviledges! 

TWO (2) PAGE RESUMES - each an 
original. 20 for $30.00. 357 0727. 



FOUND: 1 set of car keys with dorm 
room key attached. To Claim keys come 
by the Computer Center. 4th Floor Kyser 
Hall. 

FOR SALE: Pharoh Quail, live dressed. 
Eggs, fresh pickled. Rabbits 31 8 872 
2476, 



CLASSIFIED ADS 
To run your cwmlfled ad In the 

Current Sauce just drop them off in 
the Sauce box at 225A Kyser Hall. Be 
sure to leave a phone number where 
you can be reached. There Is a 
maximum run of two weeks without a 
renewal in writing, so be sure and 
specify how they they are to run. 




Noway... 

Intramural official Paula Simmons, our first Student Profile, signals an incomplete pass 
during a recent IM flag football game. Simmons is a member of Sigma Kappa, Purple 
Jackets, and is an SGA senator. 

f ============= j 

Community Bulletin Board w^ts&*s^ 

Elam Stokes FtPH 926 College Avenue { 

352-9740 

\ University Pharmacy \ 



UNIVERSITY 
PHARMACY 

Greeting Cards Overnight Film Service 

Cosmetics Timex Watches 20% Off 



! 



Vol.73, No. 12 CURRENT SAUCE November 1 3, 1 984 



Features 



11 



Current Quotes 



What do you think the United States will be like in 1988 after four more 
years under Ronald Reagan? 








Missy Pickett 
Freshman 

"I think Reagan is one of the 
best presidents we've ever 
had, so I think that we are 
going to jam in the next four 
years." 



Brian Price 
Junior 

"A depressed system of 
higher learning, an over- 
abundance of nuclear 
weapontry, and a Supreme 
Court packed with narrow- 
minded justices.' 



Michaela Sampite 
Junior 

"I think we will be about the 
same, because he will do the 
same things that he has done 
the past four years. The world 
p.eace situation will be better." 



Riad Gantus 
Freshman 

"The U.S. as a country will 
be better, but the international 
relationships, especially with 
the Middle East, will be more 
complicated." 



Daniel Kratz 
Junior 

"I feel we will be in much 
better economic shape, I also 
believe our position in the 
world will continue to im- 
prove." 





Will you attend the Louise Mandrell concert? Why or why not? 






Rachael Heider 
Freshman 

"Yes. She gives a great 



Darlene Green 
Freshman 

"No, because 



Louise 



Yaser Elzatma 
Junior 

"Yes, because 



concert, and in addition I'll be Mandrell sings country and western music' 



I like 



supporting Northwestern." 



western and I'm an R&B fan." 



* **************************** 



* 
* 

* 
* 

* 
* 
* 
* 



tteaning ^ 




SALE 

Specially Marked Items 



University Bookstore 

* November 14, 15, 16 j 

**********W****WWW+*++W* 



* 

* 
* 
* 

* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 

* 
* 
* 

* 



Judy Reynolds 
Senior 

"Yes, because it's 
Christmas Festival and 
concert goes along with 
am disappointed it's Louise 
Mandrell. I wish we could do 
better." 



the 
the 
it. I 



Henry Maggio 
Senior 

"No, because I'm very 
optimistic about the Demons 
making the playoffs and 
playing a game in Turpin 
Stadium that night. Besides, 
that's really not my style of 
music." 






DRESS SHOP 



Updated Junior 
and Career Fashions 



329 DIXIE PLAZA SHOPPING CENTER 
NATCHITOCHES, LOUISIANA 71457 



3 1 8/352- 1* 36 



November 13, 1984 CURRENT SAUCE Vol.73, No. 12 



12 



Viewpoint 



Just 2 More Weeks 



The ninth word from the Demon Dictionary salute 
the biggest event in Natchitoches (yes, this is our last 
issue before that event): 

The Christmas Festival - an annual celebration 
of food, fireworks, and fun. Makes even us city- 
slickers really enjoy being in Natchitoches. 

The 1 984 extravaganza will be held on 
December 1 , the first Saturday of the month. As 
usual, a crowd of 1 50,000 is expected to pack the 
city. 

This festival has great memories for many residents 
of Natchitoches and NSU students. It will be just my 
second time to attend, but I still remember the good 
times from last year. 

You know the ones. 

Knowing finals in six tough classes are just days 
away, but putting it aside to celebrate the biggest 
event in Natchitoches, and in most of the western 
world. 

Walking two miles to get to the riverfront since the 
town has been invaded by thousands of cars, but 
being in too good of a mood to complain. 

Trudging across town in last year's downpour to 
Maggio's on Martin Luther King. A long haul, but 
worth it to get some great Christmas spirits - literally. 

Seeing old friends and Northwestern alumni, 
who've made it back for this special event. 

And of course, enjoying the magnificent fireworks 
and Christmas lights that dot the riverfront or light up 
the skies. 

Just as the recent presidential elections installed in 
many Americans pride and patriotism, the Festival 
promises to fill us with friendship, fun, and the spirit of 
the season. 

If you've never stayed in town for the weekend, 
make plans to do so for this one. It'll be well worth 
your time. 

And remember, (I hope I don't send everyone into a 
panic, but) just 34 shopping days 'til Christmas! 
John Ramsey Editor 



Garfield 

by Jim Davis 



1 lOS/t VOO \ (*■ I LOV£ 
JOST TH £ WAV J ) VOO ,TOO. 
VOO ARE J ( ONCI c ROV 




Letter to the Editor 

Dear Editor 

The main objective for writing my editorial is to explain the so 
far the unreported so called living conditions of Rapides Dor- 
mitory. 

It seems to start off with the pungent odors coming from 
Rapides wings south and west. This is combined with the ill 
conceived idea of placing tar on the roofs in the fall when school 
is in session, since the tar sat idle all summer when very few 
students were living on campus. I personally invite all readers to 
come over and experience the smell for themselves. 

Another apparent problem is safety and with this idea in mind 
you can look out my door and see a fire alarm in place and, like 
many other things, it doesn't work. The follow-up of this is: the 
air conditioners also don't work, but, come next semester in the 
"chill" of winter, they will finally begin to function. The answer to 
the broken air conditioners seems simple: just open your 
window-but they have no screens. Therefore, bugs fly in who 
are large enough to carry you off in your sleep. 

The main reason for me writing this editorial is to explain my 
feelings combined with what I have heard from other people who 
live in the dorm. Also last week someone broke into my room, so 
maybe I should start keeping a gun so they don't come back and 
try to steal my roommate. In closing, I feel the people in housing 
should check out these problems and I should qualify for three 
credit hours of HUD project living. 

"Graduating Soon and Leaving Campus Sooner" 
Jeffrey S. Thompson, Senior 



Clearing Up the Concert Controversy 



I would like to clear something up once and for all. 

Every year we hear the same old song. It seems that each fall 
semester there are some folk who aren't pleased with the 
entertainer chosen to appear at the annual Christmas Lights 
Concert. 

This year has not been any different. Some of the arguments 
have been very valid-if one is a die-hard Springsteen fan, he 
might not see the merits of a country-pop performer like Louise 
Mandrell. I like Springsteen, too, but there is more to the 
situation than meets the eye (or ear). 

For one thing, do you have any idea what a Bruce Springsteen 
concert would cost? (I am merely using him as an example; 
substitute Huey Lewis, Culture Club, or Chicago, etc.) The 
Student Activities Board doesn't have $40,000-$50,000 plus 
to spend on a concert of that magnitude. Sure, if tickets were 
sold, the SAB could possible make the money to pay for the 
concert. But, you see, that isn't how business is run. When you 
start spending thousands of dollars, and when you get into a 
serious contract negotiations, the purchaser must have the cash 
up front, before any sort of performance is done, before artists 
and agencies will do business with you. With a concert com- 
mittee budqet of around $18,000, the SAB just can't afford 



Bruce Springsteen, Chicago, or Culture Club. 

Programming boards at other universities like Louisiana Tech 
and LSU can afford larger performances because they simply 
have more activities fee-paying students than does Nor- 
thwestern. 

Besides, even if the SAB could afford Springsteen, the 
chances are that he wouldn't perform here anyway. Prather 
Coliseum is just too small. Some performers won't entertain 
audiences of five or six thousand people-many require that 
turnout be in the tens of thousands. 

Many people claim to dislike country music. That's okay. In 
this area, however, country music performers draw crowds and 
make -loney. Two years ago the Christmas Lights Concert 
featuring Ronnie Milsap was the most successful SAB concert 
ever. 

Hopefully I have answered some questions about why Bruce 
Springsteen won't be performing Dec. 1 , in Prather Coliseum. If 
you still do not like Louise Mandrell, well, that's still okay. But, 
the SAB ticket office in Student Union 1 57 hasn't had to shut 
down due to lack of business. 

Lisa Williams 




John Ramsey 

Editor 

Lisa Williams 

Managing Editor 

Stacy Scroggins 

Business Manager 

Lucy LeBlanc 
Darlene Winslow 

Advertising 

Russel Bienvenu 

Circulation 

Bryan Williams 

Layout 

Robin Gunter 

News 



Sports 

Scott Cox 
Gena Williams 

News Staff 

Warren Tape 

Photographer 

Peter Minder 

Adviser 



Current Sauce is published 
weekly by students of 
Northwestern State 
University of Louisiana. It is 
student-run and financed, 
and is not associated with 
any of the University's 
colleges or departments. 
Staff members are selected 
by the Editor, who is chosen 
by the Student Media Board. 

Editorial and business 
offices are located at Kyser 
Hall 225A. Office hours are 
1-4:30 p.m. Tuesday through 
Friday. The telephone 
number is (31 8) 357-5456. 

All correspondence is 
welcome, and should be 
brought by the office or 
mailed to P.O. Box 5306, 
NSU, Natchitoches, LA 
71497. Deadline for both 
advertising and copy is 1 
p.m. on the Thursday 
preceding Tuesday 
publication. All contributed 
articles must be signed. 

The mail subscription rate 
is $6.00 per semester. 
Current Sauce is entered as 
second class mail in Nat- 
chitoches, LA. USPS number 
140-660. 





Northwestern State University 




of Louisiana 


Current 


Natchitoches LA 




Sauce „ k 

KgJ mJL %M December 4, 1 984 




Vol. 73, No. 13 




Festival Draws Over 1 30,000 
As City Celebrates the Season 



Kappa Alpha Fraternity members Dane Broussard and 
David Bennett make some finishing touches on the KA's 
Union window last Friday. Phi Mu won first place in the 
competition, with Omega Psi Phi and French Club rounding 
out the top three. 



Over 130,000 people flocked to Nat- 
chitoches over the weekend for the city's 
biggest annual event - the world-famous 
Natchitoches Christmas Festival. 

Unlike last year, the skies were beautiful for 
the 58th annual Festival. 

"It was really great," said Don Garner, a 
businessman employed in Lafayette. "This is 
the first time my family and I have come up 
here. We'll sure do it again." 

The famous Christmas lights on the riverfront 
were turned on immediately following the 
fireworks show by the Zambelli Corporation of 
New Castle, Penn. The crowd that saturated 
the riverfront and lined the Church Street 
bridge obviously enjoyed it. 

"The lights and fireworks were totally 
awesome," commented Sandi Thomas, a 
sophomore at Metairie's East Jefferson High 
School. "My dad's a Northwestern alum, and 
he's always dragging my brother and me up 
here for something." 

Jay Thomas, a freshman at EJ High, agreed. 
"Yep. We're always coming to Natchitoches 
for either this or that. This is the only one we 
really like, though," he said. 

The festival brought many NSU alumni back 
to town, as all day people were walking around 
campus, reminiscing. 

"My husband and I both attended Nor- 
thwestern in the sixties," said Francis 
Richardson of Shreveport. "We try to make it 
back every year for homecoming and 
especially this. It gets bigger and better every 
year." 

"It's amazing how much the campus has 



changed since we left," she continued. "When 
I graduated, Kyser Hall was opening, the Union 
was brand new, and Rapides dorm was the 'in' 
place for men to live," she said. 

"You mean people actually liked Rapides?" 
questioned one of the dorm's current 
residents. He added, "that's gross." 

The parade was highlighted by the Bud- 
weiser Clydesdales, many floats, bands, and 
the Shriners. Marshal was Senator Russel 
Long. 

Also to be tolerated during the parades were 
many cars carrying cheerleaders and pep 
squads from Natchitoches Central and St. 
Mary's high schools. 

"There must not be anyone from Central left 
on the streets. The whole school's in the 
parade," muttered Daniel Aboutboul, a Mc- 
Neese student who attended Northwestern last 
year. 

Even though, some parade groups were well 
received. 

Students watching the parade from both 
fraternity houses on Second Street "jammed" 
when the bands from Fair Park and Green Oaks 
high schools marched, or danced, by. 

"They're good," said Sharon Travler, a 
student at Shreveport's Captain Shreve High 
School. "Not as good as ours, though," she 
added, smiling. 

"The Christmas Festival is really great," said 
Greg Edmondson of Lake Charles. "While 
here, I got a chance to look at the NSU cam- 
pus. I think I'm going to come to school at 
Northwestern," he added. 

"After all, this city and University have so 
much going for it," he said. 



Nine Students Chosen For Basketball Pom Pon Squad 



Northwestern's PomPon have been selected to perform The PomPon Squad and a 
Squad will feature nine during the NSU Demons' special "Microphone Man" 
scholarship students who 1 984-85 basketball season. were chosen during auditions 

conducted this fall. Each 

Charity Bowl Set for Wednesday 



Kappa Sigma and Tau Kappa 
E Psilon fraternities will battle 
each other Wednesday night 
at 7:00 pm in Turpin Stadium 
|t the 1984 Charity Bowl 
F °otball Classic. 

For the pist eight years, the 
^SU chapter of Kappa Sigma 
^ a s played the Sig chapter at 
Louisiana Tech in the annual 



game, winning all eight games. 
This year, coordinator Randy 
Bonnette decided to play 
another NSU fraternity. 

"We look forward to playing 
TKE in this year's game," he 
said. "We'll raise more money 
for our charity - the Christmas 
Festival, and for theirs - St. 
Jude's. Also, we should have 



much more campus-wide 
interest in the game, since 
both fraternities are from 
Northwestern." 

Tickets for the contest are 
$1 in advance, and $1.50 at 
the stadium. They may be 
purchased from any member 
of either fraternity. 



student receives a $250 
scholarship for the spring 
semester. 

Northwestern's new "Mic 
Man" is Mark Colomb, a 
freshman zoology major from 
Lafayette. 

Members of the NSU 
PomPon Squad are Tracy 
Alford, freshman interior 
design major from Haughton; 
Lorita Baker, freshman, 
computer technology, 
Haughton; Julie Browder, 
sophomore, elementary 
education, Alexandria; Evelyn 
Carpenter, junior, nursing, 



Natchitoches; Brenda 
Goleman, senior, physical 
education, Natchitoches; 
Cindy McAbee, freshman, 
broadcast journalism, Fort 
Recovery, Ohio; Sonya Roark, 
freshman, pre-physical 
theraphy, Austin, Tex.; and 
Michaela Sampite, junior, 
business administration, 
Natchitoches. 

Performances by the NSU 
PomPon Squad and "Mic 
Man" are coordinated by Vicki 
Parrish, instructor of dance for 
the Department of Theatre and 
Media Arts. 



LADY DEMONS 
DOWN U.S.M. 
FOR TITLE 

see page 9 







'TIS THE 




* \ 

;» 












/ f 


See 




J 1 


pages 6-7 



Just 
Seventeen 
Shopping Days 
Until Christmas! 




A bright New Year 
is here! May it be 
the best one yet! 



Dec. 4, 1 984 CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73, No. 1 3 



News 



Videos 
Roll In 
Addition 

Are you tired of not being 
able to watch music videos 
during the week? It so, the 
solution may lie right here on 
campus. Music videos are 
shown everyday in the Union 
Addition at 2 p.m. The name of 
this one-hour music video 
show is "Rockworld" and it is 
sponsored by the Student 
Activities Board. Each week a 
new "Rockworld" is shown 
containing various types of 
music including rock, country, 
rhythm and blues, jazz, and 
punk. 

In addition to watching these 
videos, you may take part in 
"Rockworld's College Only 
Sweepstakes." Through 
these sweepstakes the 
college video will give away 
1 6 Windjammer Caribbean 
Cruises, 15 Oars Whitewater 
Rafting Adventures and 9 Bic 
Sailboards to 40 lucky 
students in the Dec. 22 
drawing. A student can enter 
Rockworld's "OUT LIKE 
TROUT" contest simply by 
writing down his name, ad- 
dress, telephone number, and 
college name and mailing it to 
Rockworld, 1698 Central 
Avenue, NY 12205 

All entries for the sweep- 
stakes must be received by 
Dec. 22, 1984. 




'Scrooge' Opens 
This Weekend 



Freshman Susan Trussell gives one of the world-famous 
Budweiser Clydesdales a little drink on Friday. The horse 
team spent the weekend at the NSU Equine Stables. 



Current Sauce 
staff positions for 
the spring are now 
open. Pick up 
applications from 
Mr. Minder at 225 
Kyser Hall, or call 
357-6671. 



The popular family musical 
Scrooge is scheduled for 
Friday and Saturday, in the 
Auditorium of the A. A. 
Fredericks Center. 

The performances, under 
the direction of senior speech 
major Keith Woods will be 
presented at 1 p.m. and 7:30 
p.m. Friday and 7:30 'p.m. 
Saturday. 

The matinee is for Nat- 
chitoches Parish school 
children. A capacity crowd of 
more than 1 ,300 school 
children is expected for the 
performance. 

NSU students are admitted 
free with ID, while other 
tickets are $4 for adults and 
$2 for students and senior 
citizens. 

Scrooge is based upon a 
adaptation of Leslie Bricusse's 



highly successful maue-for- 
television movie and the 
recent Broadway production 
of Charles Dickens' A 
Christmas Carol. 

Heading the large cast of 60 
performances is Ryan Horton 
as Ebenezer Scrooge, the 
same leading role he played in 
last year's production of the 
holiday classic. 

Other principal players are 
Dale Higginbotham as Bob 
Cratchit, Elizabeth Corley as 
Mrs. Cratchit, John Hatley as 
Tiny Tim, Britt Solano as 
Jacob Marley, Elaina Verett as 
the Ghost of Christmas Past, 
Robert Guy as the Ghost of 
Christmas Present, Scott 
Cooley as the Ghost of 
Christmas Future, and Chris 
Louisell as Tom Jenkins. 




U.S.News & World Report presents 

New&Waves 




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News waves in U S News: We analyze them every week (before they 
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Subscribe to U S News at hall-pnce Just fill out and send in the coupon 
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Features 



3 



WW2 Medic Donates Collection to NSU 



by Lisa Williams 

"No matter what nationality 
or religion of Army or civilian 
position was involved, we 
always encountered a few 
people, always a small 
minority in any group, who 
were men of good will. There 
were always a few in any 
situation who were able to 
regard us and others as 
human beings...." 

From Aid Man! 
By Robert B. Bradley 

"I lived as if it were my last 
day on earth everyday," said 
Robert B. Bradley, a veteran 
of World War II. Bradley, who 
enlisted in the Army in 1 942 
and requested that he be 
assigned to a combat medical 
unit. While in Europe, he wrote 
poetry and letters home "to 
prevent from going nuts." 

Returning to the U.S. after 
the war, Bradley wrote Aid 
Man, a story, interspersed 
with poetry, of his ex- 
periences as a combat medic. 
This book, along with another, 
From Trees to Streets, has 



been donated by him to 
Northwestern's Watson 
Library. 

"I don't regard it as good 
poetry," he laughed. "But very 
little writing has surfaced from 
that time. In desperation, I 
would try to write. I tried to do 
something significant." 

Bradley and his fellow U.S. 
Army Combat Medics, called 
Aid Men, were even prisoners 
of the German army for a time. 
They often experienced life in 
fox-holes and slit-trenches. 
Carrying no guns, and few 
possessions, the medics were 
supposed to "work on German 
soldiers if we encountered 
them," he said. 

Bradley saw death 
everyday. 

"You are frustrated as 
blazes and hate it, but we 
were trying to do good at the 
same time." 

"Only one time did I get 
really ill. This sergeant had led 
a line of soldiers. They were 
shot down, dead, in a row. i 
had to tag the bodies." 



/ 




DRESS SHOP 



Updated Junior 
and Career Fashions 



329 DIXIE PLAZA SHOPPING CENTER 
NATCHITOCHES, LOUISIANA 71457 



318/352-1436 




"The people you react to 
are the ones you have lived 
with, slept with. After they are 
replaced, you aren't close to 
them anymore; it doesn't 
bother you as much." 

"To change from an 



essentially non-violent 
existence, where you have 
little contact with wounds and 
injuries, and where relatively 
few of our educated people 
have ever watched fellow 
human beings die; to the 



The position of General 
Manager for student radio 
station KNWD-FM will 
become vacant with the 
close of the Fall Semester 
1984. Qualified applicants 
are encouraged to seek this 
important and responsible 
position by filing a Notice of 
Intention with Mr. Jerry 
Pierce (Chairman, Student 
Media Board), Room 1 03A, 
Coliseum, by not later than 
4:30 p.m., Monday, 
December 10, 198.4. 
Notices of Intention must 
include the names of 
proposed key staff 
members. 



Qualifications for 
General Manager: have 
completed at least 45 
semester hours with at 
least a 2.0 grade point 
average: must have served 
on the KNWD-FM staff for 
at least one semester prior 
to selection. Specific 
responsibilities of the 
General Manager are 
discussed in Section 5. 
Article X of the SGA 
Constitution as found in the 
1 984-85 Student Hand- 
book. The General 
Manager receives a full- 
time scholarship. 



Final Examination Schedule 
For Fall, 1984 



Wednesday, December 12,1 984 

8:00-1 0:30 a.m 1 0:00 MWF 

12:00- 2:30 p. m 1:00 MWF 

3:30- 6:00 p.m 3:00 MWF 

"Thursday, December 1 3, 1 984 

8:00-1 0:30 a.m 9:30 TT 

12:00- 2:30 p.m 12:30 TT 

3 30- 6:00 p.m 3:30 TT 

Fri <%, December 1 4, 1 984 

8:00-1 0:30 a.m 9:00 MWF 

12 00- 2:30 p.m 8:00 TT 

3:30- 6:00 pm 2:00 TT 



Saturday, December 1 5, 1 984 

8:00-10:30a.m 11:00 TT 

12:00- 2:30 p.m 12:00 MWF 

Monday, December 17,1 984 

8:00-1 0:30 a.m 11:00 MWF 

12:00- 2:30 p.m 8:00 MWF 

3:30- 6:00 p.m Unscheduled Exams 

Tuesday, December 18,1 984 

8:00-1 0:30 a.m 2:00 MWF 

12:00- 2:30 p.m 4 .00 MWF 

3:30- 6:00 p.m English 101 

Wednesday, December 19, 1984 

8:00-10:30 a.m English 100 



combat situation, where 
wounds and death are seen 
every few minutes and are in 
fact the commonplace events 
of the day, is a profound 
shock." 

It was Bradley's service as 
an Aid Man, his encounters 
with death and dying, that he 
feels has given him better 
insight into human suffering 
and strife. He feels the 
majority of young people "has 
not fully become sympathetic 
members of society." Ac- 
cording to him, they should be 
"confronted directly with 
human suffering and death. I 
don't think this would be a 
cure-all for the social distance 
existing between man and 
man in our society, but it might 
constitute a small begin- 
ning " 

....And lack of common 
comradeship, 

Sets man against himself 
though need 

Is lacking and weak minds oft 
slip. 

Why, why, can man not take 
firm hand, 

Hold fast our own eternity 
Strive less, dream more, loose 
choking band, 
Which holds him entirely 
Of personal selfishness dark? 
From "The Bird of Dawn" 

"/ must repeat, though, that 
these are a small minority of 
mankind, usually under the 
domination of an Army or 
political system in which they 
have little influence. Yet in the 
possible increase in number 
and influence of these man of 
good will lies the success and 
stability of man's world. " 

From Aid Man! 



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★★★★★ 



L>ec. 4, CUKKtNl SAULt VOL / J, r»0. u 



News 



SGA Minutes 



The Student Government 
Association was called to order by 
Shawn Wyble at 6:00 p m Those 
members ol SGA absent were: Chris 
Maggio. Jim Martin, John Sacker 
(WCC). and Charlotte Zumwalt. Mr. 
Joseph Johnson. Department of 
Languages, spoke about the up- 
coming Renaissance Fair to be held 
from March 11-16, 1985. He asked 
for student support of the festivities. 
OFFICER REPORTS 

Dane Broussard (commissioner of 
elections) announced that two 
separate bills were going to be 
presented to the senate during new 
business concerning ADOS being 
guaranteed one nomination placed on 
each honor court ballot He stated 
that the bill written by Jeff Eversull 
(Bill No. 841 1 ) was the better of the 
two. He then announced that the 
election board would meet on 
Wednesday. November 28, 1984 at 
2:00 p.m. instead of after the SGA 
meeting. 

Shawn Wyble (vice president) 
reported that Bill No 8410 was 
rescinded by Jim Martin, the sponsor 
of the bill He asked for senate ap- 
proval- disapproval of Bill No. 8408 
He then announced that Bill No 8409 
and Bill No 841 1 would be presented 
to the senate 

Tod Klotzbach (president) thanked 
John Ramsey (editor of Current 
Sauce), Robin Gunter (staff member 
of Current Sauce, and Mr Peter 
Minder (advisor of Current Sauce! for 
attending the SGA meeting He then 
read a letter from Jerry Pierce, 
chairman of the Student Media Board, 
requesting, senate approval of Lisa 
Williams as acting editor during John 
Ramsey's absence in the early part of 
the 1985 Spring Semester Tod also 
asked for feedback on scheduling two 
better known lecturers rather than 
four lesser known lecturers for the 
Distinguished Lecture Series 
COMMITTEE REPORTS 

Mignona Cote (Trip Committee) 
reported that Eileen Haynes ten- 
tatively scheduled the last weekend in 
March, 1985 as the SGA sponsored 
Softball tournament She also reported 
that Tim Jacobs is planning to set up a 
table at spring registration to raffle off 
a trip to Nassau She announced that 
she planned to call each of the 
committee members this week and 
get a progress report on their 
respective fundraisers She also 
planned to set up the point system on 



FROM ONE SPOTTER TO ANOTHER 

thanks for another season! 

FLOWER BANDIT: Thanks lor making 
my day' You're Super! 

SIGMA ALPHA IOTA, University of Yang 
members turn in your organizational 
card or forfeit University priviledges! 

TWO (2) PAGE RESUMES - each an 
original 20 for $30 00 357 0727 



COLLEGE REP WANTED 
to distribute "Student Rate" 
subscription cards on 
campus. Good income, NO 
selling involved. For in- 
formation and application 
write to: CAMPUS SER- 
VICE, 1745 W. Glendale 
Ave., Phoenix, AZ 85021. 



a poster in the SGA office. 

Lori Peterson (ADOS) thanked 
Shawn Wyble for attending one of 
their meetings in Shreveport. She 
then announced that their (ADOS) 
finances were still in "limbo.'' 
OLD BUSINESS 

Eileen Haynes moved to accept Bill 



No. 8408 as amended. Paula Sim- 
mons seconded. Motion passed 
NEW BUSINESS 

Jeff Eversull moved to approve Bill 
No. 8411. Tim Jacobs seconded 
Discussion followed. The bill was 
tabled. 

Although rescinded by Jim Martin 



prior to the SGA meeting, Dan Kratz 
moved to approve Bill No. 8410. Jon 
Mouser seconded Discussion 
followed The bill was presented so 
that additional research could be done 
this upcoming week and the bill voted 
on at the next SGA meeting. The bill 
was tabled. 



Meeting of November 26 

Eileen Haynes moved to approve 
the Ski Team budget. Jeff Eversull 
seconded. Eileen Haynes moved to 
table the motion. Paula Simmons 
seconded. Motion passed 

Lori Peterson moved to approve Bill 
No. 8409. Jodi Werfal seconded The 
bill was tabled. 



Monday Night Special 



Draft 
Choice 




Monday Night Football is back! And Mr. Gatti's is 
making a good deal even better. Buy any large pizza and 
pitcher of beer, and get your second pitcher FREE! 

With big-screen TV, cold beer and the best pizza in town, you 
can t lose — no matter which team wins. 



Make ypur draft choice at Mr. Gatti's this Monday 

to have a great time. 



Natchitoches 



it's a great way 



123 Hwy. 1 South 
357-1135 



The best pizza in town.jj^^! 




i 



HOMECOMING KING 





BUDWFlSER-.KtNG OF BE ERS • .ANHEUSER BUSCH INCEST LOUIS 
' 'Hr 



'Tis the Season... ill 



Christmas means to 



Melissa Hightower - sitting in front of tig hi 

chocolate. 

Mike Packard - Kill Dat Duck! 

Skippy Waters - An electric train gojkimi 

Tree. 

Sam Smith - a celebration of kindred 





4 

1 




Beth McMillian - Birth of Jesus Christ, my Lord and Savior. 



THE TWELVE CAJUN DAYS OF CHRISTMAS 



On the first day of Christmas my true love gave to roe 

b pirogue in a rice field. 
On the second day of Christmas my true love gave to rr.e 

two nutria rats. 
On the third day of Christmas my true love gave to me 

three shoopiks. 
On the fourth day of Christmas my true love gave to me 

four crawfish nets. 
On the fifth day of Christmas my true love gave to me 

five old brogans. 
On the sixth day of Christmas my true love gave to me 

six catfish swimming. 
On the seventh day of Christmas my true love gave to me 

seven pelicans flying. 
On the eighth day of Christmas my true love gave to me 

eight roosters fighting. 
On the ninth day of Christmas my true love gave to me 

nine Cajuns cooking. 
On the tenth day of Christmas my true love gave to me 

ten roughnecks working. 
On the eleventh day of Christmas my true love pave to me 

eleven welders welding. 
On the twelfth day of Christmas my true love gave to me 
twelve fiddlers fiddling. 

<c. 1981 Tim Edler 





Mary Hawthorne - being with loved ones. 



I 
4 



Janice Duggan - a time to be with those you love and share 
the meaning and spirit of Christmas. 



Tis the season to be jolly 
Sit back and think a white- 
Isn't that the way it goes? 
So why don't I see a smile? 

You say you've got a lot on your mind, 
so try this on for size. 
Our Savior was born around this time 
and the whole world rejoiced 

You're not the only one dragging his lip 
because life's pressures are too heavy 
Find a friend and take his hand 
together we can beat this thing. 

The pressures won't seem so heavy, 
our lip will gain some strength- 
A helping hand is all you need, 
to pull you out of it. 

Yes. tis the season to be jolly. 
But sometimes it takes a while- 
to realize the proper mood, 
displayed with a smile 

by Dan Medlin 




Twas (lii Chrk 
and all do* 
not a creaft p 
but a roacti 

The sM I 
nestled m\ 
with viskm 
still dancm i. 

With alio 
the roachei >■ 
enjoying 9i easf, 
all through 

And WckHw- 
Barry in hi 
had just si 
foralongi 

When oii 
there am 
they ran to 
whomev& 

And rigry 
should ap( 
but a truck 
and a poss Uno\ 
possum Is. f es/d 

They cfn do 
with roach 
to killed \ 
in Varnatt 1 

They si \ 
but went 
fogged d 
then W0 

Theys 
gave V/c*S 
and chat' 
before aft 

Andal 
as they 4 
'MERRY m 
and to a" 1 




Robin Gunter - waW 

brought you, praying 1 



Mark Self - A time when Christ was born, to forget our cares 
and remember the peace we can have because he did come. 



I 



Vol. 73,No. 13 CURRENT SAUCE Dec. 4, 1984 



/ that good stuff! 



tt 



Scrooge" 



>t0| 

Tontoffcg hot 

rain goj simas 
kindred 





Burt Allen - atot of work, musicians get really involved, but it 
is always fun. 

Dave Decuir - being in Natchitoches for the Christmas 
Festival. 



was tin Christmas, 
all don 
3 crem 

■oac 
>e sM ■ 
'/edsm , 
vision 
danck . 
1th alio 
roache ■ 
)ying Id psf, 
irough 
nd Vic* m- 

, in fiii 
just Si 
3 longi 
then on 
-e arosi I, 
/ ran (o 

nd wh ngry 

u/dapp 
a true* 

' a posi f.fnofe: f.ne 
,sumi$ indent!) 
heych ec/oor, 
i mart 
all eveq 

'hey 4 

ze Vic» 
^ cr)a« ; 
fore a" 
\ndai" 

fo a/" 
i 




S/ng a song of gladness and cheer, 
for the time of Christmas is here. 

Look around about you and see, 
what a world of wonder this world can be. 

Sing a Christmas carol like children do, 
and enjoy the beauty, all the joy and beauty, 
that a Merry Christmas can bring to YOU!!! 



tickets $4.00 adults 

$2. 00 students and senior citizens 

Free to NSU and LA School students with ID 

Performances at 7:30 p.m., Dec. 7-8 

Matinee for Natchitoches parish elementary school students 

at 1 :00 p.m. Dec. 7th. ($1 .00 per student.) 

For reservations contact the Dept. of Theatre and Media Arts 
at 357-6194. 



Laura Vincent - time for families to be together and share in 
the holiday spirit. 



Fran Hanks - Christ's birth, holy holiday, closeness, family 
time. 

Tommy Moore - A celebration of Jesus Christ's birthday, 
religious holiday. 



eyes 




Verdis Walker - time of loving and caring 



The first day after Christmas my true love and I had a fight. 
And so I chopped the peartree down and burned it just for 
spite. 

Then with a single cartridge, I shot that blasted partridge-my 
true love gave to me. 

The second day after Christmas I pulled on the old rubber 
gloves. And very gently wrund the necks of both the turtle 
doves--my true love gave to me. 

The third day after Christmas my mother caught the croup. 
I had to use the three french hens to make some chicken 
soup. 

The four calling birds were a big mistake for their language 
was obscene. The five gold rings were completely fake and 
they turned my fingers green. 

On the sixth day the geese wouldn't lay. so I promtly 
brought them to the ASPCA. On the seventh day what a 
mess I found all seven of the swimming swans had drown-my 
true love gave to me. 

The eighth day after Christmas before they could suspect I 
bundled up the: 
eight maids a milking 
nine ladies dancing 
ten lords a leaping 
eleven pipers piping 
tweleve drummers drumming 
(well I kept one of the drummers!) 
and sent them back collect. 

I wrote my true love we are through love, and frankly dear 
your Christmas gifts were for the BIRDS! 



raying' 



Jj wh * Santa 




Richard Rose - a baby , my baby. 

Shahn Dempsey - Santa Claus, mistletoe, egg nog, snow. 

Kevin Hopkins - a time for your family to grow closer and for 
you to think what Christmas is all about and why we have it. 




Keith Woods - graduation from NSU. 




mm 



Everyone knew 
what Jeffrey 
should do 
with his life. 

Everyone was wrong. 




I 

m 




Km 



a 
M 

# 






A legend in his own neighborhood. 

ABC Motion Pictures presents a MERCURY ENTERTAINMENT PRODUCTION 
of a GARRY MARSHALL Film "THE FLAMINGO KID" Starring MATT DILLON 
RICHARD CRENNA HECTOR ELIZONDO JESSICA WALTER 
Story by NEAL MARSHALL Screenplay by NEAL MARSHALL 
and GARRY MARSHALL Produced by MICHAEL PHILLIPS 
Directed by GARRY MARSHALL 

O'iginoJ SoundfacV avotloble on Vame So'abonde Record* cmd Ccme'tei 
y ^jf^ ^ Released by Twven'if fh Cernut y Foi Edge*ood film D<*'ribu'or 

MOTION |pt;-i3l 
PICTUR ES IT V* 



STARTS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21 AT SELECTED THEATRES. 



MICHAEL KEATON 



JOE PISCOPO 
MAUREEN STAPLETON 
GRIFFIN DUNNE 
DOM DeLUISE 
DICK BUTKUS 



MARILU HENNER 
PETER BOYLE 
GLYNNIS O'CONNOR 
RICHARD DIMITRI 
DANNY DtVITO 




Organized crime has never been 
this disorganized! 



TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX mm A MICHAEL HERTZBERG PRODUCTION 
AN AMY HECKERLING FILM • MICHAEL KEATON 'JOHNNY DANGEROUSLY 
JOE PISCOPO bjh MARILU HENNER - MAUREEN STAPLETON • PETER BOYLE 
GRIFFIN DUNNE • GLYNNIS O'CONNOR • DOM DeLUISE • RICHARD DIMITRI and DANNY DeVITO 
.'IScSfTWEIRD AL" YANKOVIC T JOHN MORRIS m '"f NORMAN GIMBEL 
» DAVID M.WALSH «g BUD AUSTIN and HARRY C0LOMBY 
I! NORMAN STEINBERG - BERNIE KUKOFF - HARRY COLOMBY -JEFF HARRIS 
^MICHAEL HERTZBERG DI T AMY HECKERLING 



iw jtjtutw * ^BH 1 mm «e(ut3' tomm tn CBS 



PG 13 







STARTS FRIDAY, DKf MBtR 21 AT SflKTfD MAM 



Sports 

Lady Demons Carry Christmas 
Magic to Hoops, Win Classic 



9 



Christmas has a certain 
magic in Natchitoches as it has 
no where else, and the Lady 
Demon basketball squad 
carried that magic to the 
hoops on Thursday and Friday 
by winning the championship 
of the first Lady Demon 
Christmas Classic. 

In the title game, NSU 
bombed Southern Mississippi, 
87-77, as freshman Gussie 
Leonard and sophomore Linda 
Grayson combined for 51 
points and 18 rebounds to 
beat the Lady Eagles. 

Leonard, a freshman from 
AAAA state power Bonnabel in 
New Orleans, had 27 points, 
while Grayson added 24 to 
lead the Lady Demons to a 2-0 
mark. 

Annie Harris added 1 2 for 
NSU, while Lonnie Banks 
picked up 10 points. USM 
was led by the tournament 
MVP, Portland McCaskill, who 
scored 27 points. Teammate 
Wilhelmina Smith added 20. 

In the consolation game, 
ninth-ranked Louisiana State, 
upset in the first round by 
Southern Miss, breezed past 
0-3 Southwestern Louisiana, 
77-53. The Ben-Gals now 
stand at 2-1 on the season. 

In the first round, Nor- 
thwestern blizted USL 98-81 



to advance to the finals. Lady 
Demons Sandy Pugh and 
Harris both had 16 points, 
while Teressa Thomas picked 
up 1 2 and Banks added 10. 

The tournament's opening 
game saw the Lady Golden 
Eagles of USM upset LSU, 
75-74, on a last-second shot 
by McGaskill. 

The Lady Demons return to 
action on Tuesday night as 



they host McNeese State in 
Prather Coliseum at 7:30. On 
Saturday, the Ladies travel to 
Lorman, MS, to face Alcorn 
State. 

Lamar University will visit the 
Coliseum on Monday night, 
and then comes the 
showdown with 7th-ranked 
Northeast in Natchitoches on 
December 1 9 at 5:45. 



Ladies Overcome 
Obstacles To Win 



by Lisa Williams 

It is the only team so far this 
year to defeat Louisiana Tech, 
and technically it isn't even a 
varsity team . 

Formed just this semester, 
the NSU Ladies Cross 
Country Club has participated 
in seven competitive meets. 
At the Louisiana Tech 
University meet, Northwestern 
placed second behind NLU 
and placed third in the Gulf 
Star conference meet held at 
Stephen F. Austin. 

The group consisted of 
"either students, graduate 
students, faculty and staff of 



Northwestern," said Dr. 
George Younger, the club's 
coach for this fall. "Everyone 
who competed was 
associated with the Univer- 
sity." Members who ran with 
the club this year were Lisa 
Breazeal, Christine Ford, Lori 
Francis, Margaret Gies, 
Margaret Hennigan, Sherri 
Waggoner and Melanie 
Younger. 

The runners are not a team, 
per se, because they are not 
sanctioned by the NCAA. 
"Plans are underway to move 
see "CC Team" 
page eleven 



rain 



1 

Lady Demon Annie Harris clowns around during one of last 
week's basketball practices. The Ladies opened the season 
with wins over USL and USM, and a championship of the 
Christmas Classic. 

Goodwin Selected As 
Coach of the Year 



Head football coach Sam 
Goodwin has been named as 
Gulf Star Conference Coach 
of the Year and his Demon 
football team has dominated 
the first-ever GSC All- 
Conference selections. 

Northwestern placed six 
players on the first unit of the 
all-conference team, led by 
unanimous selection Arthur 
"Tank" Berry on the defensive 
line. Safety Michael Richard- 



son and linebacker Earnest 
Crittenden were also named to 
the first unit on defense. 

On offense, NSU was 
represented on the first unit by 
receiver Odessa Turner, 
tackle James Boyd and guard 
Maxie Smith. With Crittenden 
and Turner named to the first 
team the Demons had two of 
only four sophomores named 
to the first team on both of- 
fense and defense. 



A NEW MATT DILLON 
...ON THE MOVE 

OK, smart guy! What would you 
do if you were Jeffrey Willis? It's 
your last summer before choosing 
between college and jobless 
oblivion. Now comes a summer 
dream job at the ritzy El Flamingo 
Beach Club, a luxurious haunt of 
the New York rich absolutely 
dripping easy money and overrun 
with beautiful girls. You rub more 
than shoulders with a gorgeous 
blonde coed visiting from 
California, you are taken under the 
wing of the Club's resident "get- 
rich-quick" artist and, suddenly, 
college is coming in a very distant 
second. 




Stallone in a second "Blood" called 
"Rambo;" Hector Flizondo (as 

Jeffrey's concerned father) was last 
seen in the hilarious "Young 
Doctors in Love," and Jessica 
Walter (as the status-conscious 
Mrs. Brody) is best remembered for 
asking Clint Fast wood to "Play 
Mistv For Me." 



Matt and Janet — a breath of fresh air. 




Matt Dillon is "The Flamingo Kid." 



So, in September, what will it be? 
For Matt Dillon as Jeffrey Willis in 
Twentieth Century Fox's "The 
Flamingo Kid," the decision won't 
be easy. Everyone has an idea about 
what he should do with his life — 
and they're ALL wrong. 

Flair for comedy 

As the bright but less than "Easy 
Street" smart Jeffrey, Matt Dillon 
takes on a role tailored to show the 
talented young actor in a new light. 
Sure, he's still a legend in his own 
neighborhood, but in "The 
Flamingo Kid," Dillon is a 
rumblefish out of water with a flair 
for comedy and a crush on shapely 



newcomer Janet Jones. The tall, 
sunny blonde shines in her first 
major film role after brief 
appearances in "One From the 
Heart" and "Grease II." A veteran 
at age 22 of five seasons on TV's 
"Dance Fever" team, Janet Jones 
will follow her role in "The 
Flamingo Kid" by starring in the 
eagerly awaited film version or "A 
Chorus Line." 

Also starring is a seasoned trio of 
top performers. Richard Crenna 
(as slick sports car dealer Phil 
Brody) recently made his mark in 
"Body Heat" and "First Blood," 
and will soon reteam with Sylvester 




Shapely newcomer Janet Jones. 

For director Garry Marshall, "The 
Flamingo Kid" is a comedy right up 
his alley. Known for his knack with 
youthful casts of hit TV shows such 
as "Happy Days" and "Laverne & 
Shirley," Marshall guides "The 
Flamingo Kid" on the heels of his 
first hilarious feature, "Young 
Doctors in Love." 

For a dash of summer in the dead of 
winter, here comes "The Flamingo 
Kid." Your last days before college 
were never this hot and bothered. 







Oec. 4, LURKbNI !>AUUt voi. / 3, i-iu. ■ -» 



10 



"I found it (fulfillment) in the kids..." 



Evans Retiring After 1 7 Years 



by LeJoyce Gaulden 

If you ever resided in one of 
the dorms in which Hazel 
Evans was house director, 
then you have had the great 
opportunity to get to know a 
very warm, kind, yet strict 
woman. Evans is the type of 
person you would love to have 
as a mother, grandmother or a 
best friend. After 1 7 years, 
she is retiring from NSU. 

Evans was born in Mamou, a 
town approximately 30 miles 
from Opelousas. Making 



Opelousas her home, she 
worked in 
management/housing positi- 
ons at the James Inn for 
several years and the Howard 
Johnson's for three years. 

She came to Northwestern 
in 1 966 and worked as house 
director for four years in 
Natchitoches Dorm, where 
she met then head basketball 
coach Tynes Hildebrand, now 
athletic director. 

"Coach Hildebrand is one 
man I highly respect. He would 
come and check on his 




W-. 

Mrs. Hazel Evans 



basketball players and would 
always tell them to obey me 
and they did. Coach 
Hildebrand is a kind, yet firm 
man and I like that." 

Evans also named Dean 
Nichols and Dean Bosarge as- 
nice, strong and respected 
men whom she highly ad- 
mires. 

She commented on campus 
improvements and how proud 
she is and always will be of 
Northwestern. Since she's 
been here, she has worked in 
Rapides for five years, Sabine 
for one year and Louisiana 
dorm for two years. 

What does she enjoy most 
about her job? The 
students... the good, the bad, 
black and white. I came here 
looking for fulfillment. I found it 
in the kids. You have to be a 
house director to really un- 
derstand," she said. 

What she'll miss most? "I'll 
miss sitting in the lobby 
watching my girls leave all 
dressed up and looking pretty 
going to sorority and fraternity 
formals, football games, and 
seeing their dates pick them 
up." 

And surely many dorm 
residents will miss Hazel 
Evans, too. 

Mrs. Evans has touched 
the lives of many students at 
NSU. She will indeed be 
missed.— Ed. 



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•e^^^^Community Bulletin Board w»J*tf0>*5-e« ^ 

Elam Stokes RPH 926 College Avenue 4 
352-9740 

University Pharmacy \ 



News 



OVERSEAS EMPLOYMENT 

WORLD-SIDE OPPORTUNITIES FOR MEN AND WOMEN! 
JAPAN - EUROPE - AFRICA - AUSTRALIA - THE SOUTH 
PACIFIC - SOUTH AMERICA - THE FAR EAST. 
EXCELLENT BENEFITS. HIGHER SALARIES AND WAGES! 
FREE TRANSPORTATION! GENEROUS VACATIONS ! 
More than 300,000 Americans Japan, Africa, The South 



— not including members of 
the armed services — are 
now living overseas. These 
people are engaged in nearly 
e v e r y p os s i ble activi- 
ty. ..construction, engineer- 
ing, sales, transportation, 
secretarial work, accoun- 
ting, manufacturing, oil 
refining-, teaching, nursing, 
government, etc. -etc. And 
many are earning S2.000 to 
$5.000 per month. ..or more! 

To allow you the op- 
portunity to apply for 
overseas employment, we 
have researched and compil- 
ed a new and exciting direc- 
tory on overseas employ- 
ment. Here is just a sample 
of what our International 
Employment Directory 
covers. 

(1) . Our International 
Employment Directory lists 
dozens of cruise ship com- 
panies, both on the east and 
west coast. You will be told 
what type of positions the 
cruise ship companies hire, 
such as deck, hands, 
restaurant help, cooks, 
bartenders, just to name a 
few. You will also receive 
several Employment Ap- 
plication Forms that you 
may send directly to the 
companies you would like to 
work for. 

(2) . Firms and organiza- 
tions employing all types of 
personnel in Australia, 



Pacific, The Far East, Southj 
America. ..nearly every part 
of the free world! 
.(3). Companies a n <| 
Government agenciej 
employing personnel in near-? 
ly every occupation, from 
the unskilled laborer to ttalj 
college trained professional; 
man or woman. 

(4) . Firms and organiza- 
tions engaged in foreign con^ 
struction projects, manufac- 
turing, mining, oil refining, 
engineering, sales, services, 
teaching, etc., etc. 

(5) . How and where to ap- 
ply for overseas Government 
jobs. 

(6) . Information about 
summer jobs. 

(7) . You will receive our 
Employment Opportunity 
Digest. ..jam-packed with | 
formation about current y 
opportunities. Special se 
tions features news 
overseas construction pro-f 
jects, executive positions 
and teaching opportunities. I 

90 Day Money 
Back Guarantee 
Our International Employ- 
ment Directory is sent to you 
with this guarantee. If for 
any reason you do not obtain 
overseas employment or yol 
are not satisfied with the job 
offers. ..simply return out 
Directory within 90 days and 
we'll refund your money pro- 
mptly. ..no questions asked. 



ORDER FORM 

International Employment Directory 
131 Elma Dr. Dept.T21 
Centralia, WA 98531 

Please send me a copy of your International Employment 

Directory. I understand that I may use this information for 90 
days and if I am not satisfied with the results, I may return 
your Directory for an immediate refund. On that basis I'm 
enclosing 520.00 cash.... check.... or money order.... for your 
Directory. 

NAME 



please print 

ADDRESS APT # 

CITY STATE 

International Employment Directory 1984 



ZIP 




con 

'985," > 

Gained t 
I'he p ro 

*ornen" 

greNCA. 
torts." 

\ n ° track 
>ics ' 

«oI a little 
W Cours 



Vol. 73, No. 1 3 CURRENT SAUCE Dec. 4, 1 984 



Current Quotes 



11 



What do you think would make the ideal Christmas? 




a bout 



ZIP 



Kathy Jarrell 
Sophomore 
Nursing 
Lafayette 

"To be at home with good 
friends and my family and 
knowing finals are over and 
that you did well on them." 



Herman Brown 
Sophomore 
Accounting 
Alexandria 

"For everyone to be happy, 
for it is a happy occasion, and 
for everyone to remember 
what Christmas really means." 



Mary McCormick 
Junior 
Advertising 
Many 

"The ideal Christmas would 
be my whole family together 
again." 



Jimmy Chilton 
Senior 

Industrial Technology 
Gretna 

"Hot chocolate, a roaring 
fire, and my fiance in just a 
bow." 




Beth Wright 
Senior 
Social Work 
Bossier City 

"Having my best friends with 
me, going to Midnight Mass 
together, and watching my 
children's expressions when 
they open gifts." 



What is the one thing you want most for Christmas? 



Linda Garner 
fr eshman 

"°me Ec. Education 
norien 

"! would like my Master's 
( De 9 r ee, or a black Z-28 
■nrnmed in red " 



Shahn Dempsey 
Freshman 
English Education 
Winnfield 

"Just to be with my friends. 




Lynn Lindsey 
Freshman 
Advertising 
Natchitoches 

"To spend it with someone 
special - my Tonka truck." 



CC Team 



cont. from p. 9 

3 N CAA affiliation by Fall 
°5," Younger said. He 
plained that Northwestern is 
tn e process of expanding 



' r athletic program to 



in- 
more varsity sports for 
wien," or we '|| | ose our 

^je NCAA affiliation in all our 

Jj° r those unfamiliar with 
s os s country athletics, there 
track racing," said Lisa 
azeale, an instructor 
gobies 



of 

dance at NSU. 



Oss-country is kind of 
Caging, | think. During the 
^ of the three to three 
mj° n e-half mile race, you 
oj^ 1 r un through ten woods, 
iw a little bridge, and then 
the ° ut ir| to a hayfield. All of 
ej! courses are hilly, 

H f" y the one at Tecn - lt>s 
y ftJ nny seeing all these 



women running down a dirt 
road, jockying for a position," 
she laughed. 

Because the club was not 
NCAA-sanctioned, they 
received no financial support 
from NSU's athletic depart- 
ment and had to be 
responsible for their own 
expenses. "We enjoy run- 
ning," said Breazeale. "We 
are just trying to get it started 
for Northwestern and to add 
track to the list of women's 
sports at NSU." 

Younger, who was asked by 
Tynes Hildebrand, athletic 
director, to coach the cross- 
country club, commented that 
he had "never worked with a 
finer group." 

He also said that efforts 
were being made to recruit 
students for next year's cross- 
country group. 



FREE! FREE! FREE! FREE! Student Gift 
Pax's, male and temale, come by the 
Student Activities Office, Union 21 4. 

FOR SALE: Three formals: rose colored 
taffeta, drop waist, size 5, $65; 
lavendar, ruffled sleeves, on or off 
shoulder, size 5. $60; blue laced with 
spaghetti straps/matching jacket size 
7, $20. Phone 357 6741 or 357-6730 



2 PAGE RESUMES: Each an original. 20 
for $30.00. 357 0727. 



FOR SALE: 1964 Fairlane 500. Black 
with chrome, blue interior. New paint 
job and carpet. $600. Call Gary at 472 
6423 on weekends or after 4 p.m. on 
Mondays and Wednesdays. Also 1949 
Chevrolet truck body $200. 

FOUND: 1 set of car keys with dorm 
room key attached. To Claim keys come 
by the Computer Center, 4th Floor Kyser 
Hall. 

FOR SALE: Pharoh Quail, live dressed 
Eggs, fresh pickled. Rabbits 318-872- 
2476. 

FOR SALE: Registered Tennessee 
walking horses. Stallion, mares 
gelding, weanling colts. 318-872 2476 



Lisa Kennedy 
Senior 
German 
Pineville 

"I would like Mikhael 
Baryshniknov wearing just a 
bow." 



R.L. Smith 
Senior 
Geology 
Slagle 

"All I want would like is a 

job." 



Juniors, Seniors, Graduate Students 



Apply For Credit Cards 

Zales Dillard Sears 
MasterCard/Visa 

Student Union Lobby 
Wednesday and Thursday 
December 5 & 6 
10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. 

Sponsored By: 

The Society For Advancement 
Of Management 



life A 1UH4 r'| IUBI-MI NAI'l.r VOL / J,™. I J 

Dec. 4, 1 984 CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73, No. 1 3 



12 



Viewpoint 



Finals. . . 
Bah Humbug! 

And now a fitting end to the semester's final 
Current Sauce - the tenth word from the Demon 
Dictionary. 

Finals - the week-long barrage of tests to 
determine your grade in any particular class. Like 
registration, it is a four-letter word. 

Despite popular opinion, finals are not a Communist 
invention. They are a western creation. In fact, the 
first university final examinations come from 
England's Cambridge University. There the final is 
often 100 percent of the class grade. And you 
thought one-third was bad. 

There are several types of attitudes that a Nor- 
thwestern student may take during the days before 
final exam week. These include: 

The "don't talk to me!" attitude - this often is 
caused due to lack of sleep, due to all-night study 
sessions, due to the realization that Dad (and his 
checkbook) may not think a 1 .5 is too cool. 

The "who cares?" attitude - when you realize that 
the 1.5 GPA Dad won't like is probably the best you 
can do barring an act of Congress and/or a major 
miracle from upstairs. (No, not the Kyser 4th floor 
Computer Center). 

The "well I'm graduating this fall" attitude - not if the 
teacher in the Fine Arts 1 04 class you put off for four 
years has anything to do with it. 

The "finals don't matter - the teacher like me" 
attitude - this same thing worked from kindergarten 
through high school, but it stops in college. Try to 
convince a Physics teacher that despite the 41 
on your final, you're a good kid and deserve a B. 
Won't work. 

And if finals weren't bad enough, the Roy(al) Hall 
heirarchy has decreed a major change in NSU's time- 
honored finals schedule. 

Instead of English 1 00 and 1 01 exams on the first 
day, they now conclude finals. Teachers will have 
one or two days to grade upwards of 1 00 essays. 
Meanwhile, many instructors will have five or six days 
to grade a few multiple choice tests. Does that make 
sense? 

Also, the college student's sacred day (or the best 
day to recover from the night before) - Saturday - has 
been added to the exam schedule. Looks like 
Scooby Doo will have to do without me, for I'll now be 
sitting in Kyser bright and early on Saturday for my 
Spanish final. 

Speaking of Spanish, Feliz Navidad and good luck 
on finals! by John Ramsey 



Dear Editor, 

Please publish this letter of thanks for all those people who 
participated in "Demon Dynamite" activities for the four home 
games. Although attendance at the last home game activities 
was sparse, I hope we can continue this plan next year. 

I urge all students, faculty, and university employees to feel 
proud to be at N.S.U. and to work together for the improvement 
of the University. 

Please get involved and help us make every year a great one! 

Nan Holmes 
Athletic Department 



Garfield 

by Jim Davis 



HERE WE ARE IN A REAL 
PACTORV, B0V5 ANP GIRLS. LET'S 
SEE WHAT WE CAN LEARN... 





Letter to the Editor 

Dear Editor, 

During the week of Nov. 5-9, some person or persons stole 
five paintings from an exhibition by Heather Kelly, art faculty 
member at McNeese State University, which were on display in 
NSU's Hanchey Art Gallery. 

The NSU Art Department has struggled for years to provide an 
exhibition space, so that the students and faculty of the 
university could share their efforts and those of other artists. 
Finally in 1 982, the Center for the Creative and Performing Arts 
was completed, and the Hanchey Art Gallery was available to 
provide NSU with one of the finest art exhibition spaces in the 
state. 

That was the good news. The bad news was that there were 
no funds other than those from an already depleted depart- 
mental budget with which to operate such a gallery. For two 
years the Art Department has overcome that obstacle by the 
individual efforts of faculty, students and friends of the Arts. 
There has been an unbroken series of exhibitions, provided 
largely at the expense of the exhibitors and the Art Department. 

Suddenly this exciting flow of arts activity has stopped, 
motionless. The Hanchey Art Galley stands dark and empty at 
this moment, with meaningless identification tags that are the 
only remains of a colorful and exciting exhibition of paintings. 
Heather Kelly, the nationally-known artist whose works were 
stolen, was so concerned over the loss that she came to NSU 
last Saturday to recover what was left of her show. NSU's 
relations with McNeese State University are thus deeply 
strained. Exhibitors scheduled for the coming months will have 
second thoughts when they hear of this occurrence, and they 
will. Opportunities to share exhibitions from major museums are 
now seriously jeopardized. Patrons of the arts will hesitate to 
support our gallery efforts. All NSU students taking fine arts 
classes will have difficulty fulfilling requirements to attend art 
exhibitions. Art students are most discouraged, for if they 
cannot exhibit their work, they lose an important goal and op- 
portunity. The Art faculty is distressed about how to overcome 
all of these problems. 

The paintings that were stolen are not "products." There are 
no others like them in the world, and they cannot be replaced. 
Only one of the items was really "for sale," the others so 
meaningful to the artist that she had planned to keep them for 
her private collection. 

I wonder if the thief thought about any of this? I wonder if they 
thought at all? If by some chance the person/persons 
responsible for this shameful act reads this, please reconsider 
what you have done and return the works to the Art Department. 
An anonymous tip (our phone number is 357-4544) will do. 
Please help us to retain the good name of our department, and 
the university. 

Bill Bryant 
Department Head, Art 



Current 
Sauce 
Staff 



John Ramsey 

Editor 

Lisa Williams 

Managing Editor 

Stacy Scroggins 

Business Manager 

Lucy LeBlanc 

Advertising 

Russel Bienvenu 

Circulation 

Bryan Williams 

Layout 

Robin Gunter 

News 

Kim Nolde 

Sports 

Lejoyce Gaulden 
Susie Nevels 
David Silver 

Staff Writers 

Warren Tape 
Kevin Hopkins 

Photographers 

Peter Minder 

Adviser 

Current Sauce is published 
weekly by students of 
Northwestern State 
University of Louisiana. It is 
student-run and financed 
and is not associated with 
any of the University's 
colleges or departments. 
Staff members are selected 
by the Editor, who is chose" 
by the Student Media Board. 

Editorial and business 
offices are located at Kys« f 
Hall 225A. Office hours are 
1-4:30 p.m. Tuesday through 
Friday. The telephofli 
number is (31 8) 357-5456. 1 

All correspondence *■ 
welcome, and should I* 
brought by the office fll 
mailed to P.O. Box 5306, 
NSU, Natchitoches, Lj 
71497. Deadline for botf 
advertising and copy i*J 
p.m. on the Thursdfl 
preceding Tuesd*J 
publication. All contribute! 
articles must be signed. 

The mail subscription ra«^ 
is $6.00 per semester. 
Current Sauce is entered * 
second class mail in N*J 
chitoches, LA. USPS numb" 
140-660. 



Current Sauce 



rthwestern State University 

of Louisiana 

Natchitoches, LA 

January 29, 1985 
Vol. 73, No. 14 




Jan. 29, 1 985 CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73, No. 1 4 



News 



Potpourri on schedule; 
Book due in early May 



By Lisa Williams 

Managing Editor 

Provided they meet their 
Feb. 1 deadline, the Potpourri 
staff should be issuing the 
1985 Potpourri "around the 
first week in May," Potpourri 
editor-in-chief Carla Erickson 
said in an interview on 
Thursday. 

We have met all of our 
previous deadlines," she said. 
"Everyone is finishing his last 
few pages. This is our hardest 
deadline, since we just got 
back from vacation." 

"Skippy Waters, who is 
editor of the Greek section, 
still has a lot of pages to finish, 
but his section will look really 
good. He is trying to get more 
information about the Greeks 
but he is having trouble getting 
the information from them." 

"As usual, we are having 
problems with getting pic- 
tures. Dwight Bordelon, who is 
head photographer, has been 
a great help." 

Erickson said she was proud 
of the work that her staff has 
done this year. "You will 
sometimes have problems 
getting people to do their 
work, but they always come 
through." 

If the staff has been extra 
busy this year, or if the 
yearbook is a little late, part of 
the reason may be due to the 



size of the 1985 Potpourri. 
"This year we will have 304 
pages in comparison to the 
264 pages of last year's 
Potpourri," said Erickson. We 
did special coverage of 
Northwestern's Centennial." 
Other changes she noted 
were more pages for the 
Greeks and the administration, 
an index and six pages of color 
in the Student Life section. 

"We have worked hard to 
minimize errors, but it is dif- 
ficult to correct errors, 
especially when you are 
looking at your own work." 

"When the work is done on 
the 1 985 Potpourri, it will be 
time to begin plans for the 
1986 edition. 

Peter Minder, advisor said, 
"I am very eager to see a new 
staff get started on the 1 986 

book." 

"The yearbook coverage is 
from February to February, so 
even though the 1 986 book is 
more than one year away, it is 
now time for us to fervently 
start working on the 1986 
edition. We will make general 
announcements soon about 
applying for positions with the 
1986 staff. I am already 
encouraged to see so mary 
new journalism students 
express an interest in working 
on the publications." 




Union Pacific number 8444 passed through Natchitoches 
last week on its way from the New Orleans World's Fair to 
the west coast. A large crowd met the train, the last steam- 
driven one in the U.S., as it chugged its way through town. 



Demon Connection Hits Campus Next Week 



Demon Connection, the 
University's annual visitation 
day for high school juniors and 
seniors from throughout the 
state, will be conducted next 
Wednesday, on campus. 

Scheduled from 8:45 a.m. 
to 2 p.m., the program in- 
troducing students to NSU will 
feature campus tours, 
meetings with faculty and 
student leaders, information 
on academic programs and 
special sessions on 
scholarships and financial aid, 
choosing a major, career 
outlooks and campus 
organizations. 

Tony Hernandez, program 
coordinator said registration 
will begin at 8:45 a.m. in the 
Union lobby. The program will 
begin at 9 a.m. 

"Students will have the 
opportunity to attend a 
general information session, 
one special-interest session 



and one program on an 
academic major," said Her- 
nandez, who expects a 
number of high school 
students to participate in 
Demon Connection activities. 

A special concert by the 
Entertainers, is also included 



The College Success 
Program is seeking tutors for 
the Spring Semester. 

College Success classes 
(Reading 98, 99 and 100; 
Math 99 and 100; English 99 
and 100; College Success 
100) are designed to give 
students the skills needed to 
complete their chosen 
curriculum. The program 
provides tutoring for all 98, 99 
and 100 level, most freshman 
level classes, and can help 



Thaaar she blows? 



in this year's Demon Con- 
nection program. 

Hernandez said visiting high 
school students will have the 
opportunity to learn about all 
academic majors. There will 
also be special-interest 
sessions on scholarships and 



locate tutors for other classes 
A well equipped Learning 
Laboratory is available for 
individual and small group 
tutoring. Academic and 
personal counseling is also 
provided to assist students. 

The responsibilities of the 
tutor are to help students 
understand concepts and 
ideas, benefit from new ways 
of studying, and provide 
additional resource materials 
more suited to the students' 



financial aid, choosing a major, 
Greeks, academic and per- 
sonal life, special services, 
career opportunities, and the 
ROTC. 

Additional information on 
Demon Connection is available 
by calling 357-5240. 



needs. Tutors should willingly 
be available at a regularly 
scheduled time and undergo a 
minimal amount of training. 

Persons interested in 
tutoring for pay should contact 
Judith Lott, counselor at 357- 
5435. All applicants will be 
interviewed and transcripts 
reviewed. 

Tutors in all areas are 
welcome, however, the 
greatest need at this time is in 
sciences. 



Current Sauce 



January 29, 1985 
Vol. 73, No. 14 



On the Cover 

For several generations, 
the three columns of the old 
Bullard Hall have served as 
the symbol for Nor- 
thwestern State University. 

In this issue, we look at 
the different places from 
which NSU students hail. 
The places that the three 
columns draw students 
from. Like most state 
universities, we draw 
students from 61 of 
Louisiana's 64 parishes. 
But was also attract 
students from such diverse 
places as Brazil, China, and 
the Middle East. And it is 
this diversity that makes a 
university a true learning 
experience. 




The Demon basketball 
squad won its second game 
of the season Thursday 
night by upsetting Sam 
Houston State in the 
Coliseum. See page 1 2. 

A new regular cartoon 
feature joins the staff this 
week. See Doonesbury by 
Garry Trudeau on page 1 5. 

Page 16 is devoted to 
Current Sauce's newest 
feature - "Noteworthy" 1 
the weekly guide to what's 
going on, in and around 
NSU. 



A student viewpoint of 
the current situation with 
Demon basketball - see 
page 1 5. 

Did you know Nor- 
thwestern has a campus 
located on England Air 
Force Base in Alexandria. 
Most people don't. Bead 
all about it on page 6. 



College Success Seeks Tutors 



Vol. 73, No. 1 4 CURRENT SAUCE Jan. 29, 1 985 




Page 3 



Return to King Arthur 

A merchant and customer do business at last year's Medieval-Renaissance Fair. The 
second fair is scheduled for March 11-16, and is being promoted as a University-wide 
event. 

Education center 'coming back' 



The Center for the History of 
Louisiana Education is making 
a comeback after a 
devastating fire in October of 
1982 destroyed a nine-room 
collection of irreplaceable 
artifacts housed in Caldwell 
Hall. 

"Much has been done in the 
past two years to reconstruct 
this important state museum 
'or education," said Center 



director Maxine Southerland. 
"We still need the help of 
educators and friends of 
education throughout the 
state to assist with the 
collection and preservation of 
memorabilia." 

The museum for education 
is being temporarily housed in 
the Teacher Education 
Center. The University's old 
Women's Gymnasium, which 



was entered officially this year 
into the National Register of 
Historic Places, has been 
designated as the permanent 
site for the Center. 

"The Women's Gymnasium 
is a beautiful old building that 
will be a perfect home for the 
museum," said Mrs. 
Southerland. "It has a 
prestigious heritage because 
of its architectural style." 



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Hurry, This Offer Ends Sat., Feb.9, 1 985 



NSU Preparing For 
'85 Renaissance Fair 



The lawn surrounding the 
Old President's Home will 
become a garden of love and a 
field of honor as knights and 
ladies, rogues and bawds, 
sorcerers and witches, 
troubadors and actors, 
scholars and fools, goliards 
and monks seize the day and 
Northwestern becomes, if 
only for a brief and shining 
moment, Camelot. 

The second annual Nor- 
thwestern Louisiana Medieval- 
Renaissance Festival is being 
planned for March 11-16, 
1 985. The Festival, will like the 
one last year, consist of 
movies, discussion, video 
tapes and exhibits focusing on 
some aspect of life in that 
exciting and romantic past, the 
Middle Ages and 
Renaissance. Films such as 
The Lion in Winter, Becket, or 
Monty Python and the Holy 
Grail are being considered for 
showing; and a panel 
discussion on a subject like 
"Chivalry: Love Religious and 
Romantic" is planned. Oliver's 
King Lear will be shown and a 
discussion of the play may 
follow. 

For many people, though, 
the highlight of the Festival 
may be the Medieval- 
Renaissance Fair which is 
scheduled for that Thursday, 
Friday and Saturday, March 
14-16, for the Fair is the 
festive celebration, the party, 
the carnival. Presided over by 
students as Lord of Misrule 
(the jester-fool authorized to 
play pranks and to dismiss 
classes) and Master of the 
Revels (the one overseeing 
the Fair and its activities), 
Northwestern's Medieval-Re- 
naissance Fair is patterned 



after actual historical fairs and 
after the recreations so 
popular now in Texas, Con- 
necticut, California and 
Florida. 

Besides booths selling food 
and drink, hawkers pushing 
trinkets, cut-purses and 
bawds pursuing gulls, cony- 
catchers offering games of 
skill and of chance, gallants 
chasing wenches and ladies 
hunting beaus, there will be 
varied contests, events and 
entertainments. 

According to Joseph A. 
Johnson, co-ordinator of the 
Festival, "A tentative schedule 
is being drawn up now. The 
Festival, especially the Fair, 
offers an excellent opportunity 
for student groups, or for ' 
individual students, to raise 
money, to get some good 
publicity, or to earn points for 
community or university 
service. This is a student 
event, but it is important that 
any organization, or individual, 
wishing to participate get in 
touch with me immediately. I 
can be reached at the 
Department of Language Arts 
or, by phone, at 357-6608 or 
352-9026. And I welcome 
ideas and suggestions, just as 
long as they are legal." 

Last year the Fair was at- 
tended by members of the 
Society for Creative 
Anachronisms from Baton 
Rouge and Shreveport, and 
they plan to return this year. 
Consisting of men and women 
interested in various aspects 
of medieval life, the SCA put 
on mock tournaments and 
sword fights, gave exhibitions 
of magic and belly dancing, 
see 'Medieval...' 
on page 4 



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WINTER 

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Tuesday, Jan. 29 

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$100 Bar Tab Raffled 



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^***MiiM<M«i««<iMMi««vt«fmir 



Page 4 



Jan. 29, 1985 CURRENT SAUCE Vol.73, No. 14 



New campus nears completion; 
Nursing facilities to merge 



The completion date is near 
for the new Nursing Education 
Center now under con- 
struction at 1 800 Line Avenue 
in Shreveport. 

"This project is about 95 



Medieval 
Festival 
Scheduled 

continued from 
page 3 

presented displays of 
weapons and armor, gave 
instructions on dancing and 
talked with people interested 
in forming a local barony of 
SCA. 

NSU's Equestrain Science 
Department had a show of 
jousting-the-rings, precision 
riding and medieval hors- 
emanship. A local group, the 
Renaissance Ensemble, 
presented continuous music. 
Witches were dunked and 
faces were painted. Tug-of- 
war and fenching matches, 
one including President Orze, 
were popular. The Nor- 
thwestern Demon, Vic himself, 
made welcomed appearance 
and the Lord of Misrule 
pranced through the halls of 
academe playing pranks and 
freeing classes. Damsels were 
chased, and beards were 
judged. Flags waved in the 
breezes and banners flew 
high. The campus had been 
transformed somewhere in 
time and had returned to 
Camelot. 

Speaking of the 1 985 
Festival, Johnson said, "The 
opportunities are even greater 
and the possibilities even 
more open this year than last 
year. We are still learning, we 
are still experimenting, nothing 
is set or pre-determined, and 
that is exciting. The Festival 
has official approval and 
support; but, ultimately, it is a 
student event and it depends 
on student involvement, 
student support and student 
participation." 

"We are the first university 
that I know of," he continued, 
"to hold a Festival and Fair like 
ours and that is exciting. 
Besides, it comes after Mardi 
Gras and midterms but before 
Easter; and that's a good time 
for one big parry. Remember 
that these fairs were being 
held long before there were 
any Puritans, long before 
Cromwell and his Roundheads 
tried to take the cakes and ale 
out of li f e." 



percent complete," said Loren 
Lindsey, director of physical 
plant planning, development 
and maintenance. "We should 
be completing the job within 
the next 30 to 45 days." 

The project, which will cost 
some $8 million, involves the 
construction of a new 
academic-administrative build- 
ing and the renovation and 
restoration of the old Line 
Avenue School. 

Both buildings are located 
nest to Schumpert Medical 
Center. The Line Avenue 
School was entered in the 
National Register of Historic 
Places in June of 1 981 . 

The new Nursing Education 
Center will provide the 
College of Nursing with ap- 
proximately 88,000 square 
feet of additional ad- 
ministrative and classroom 
space. 



Lindsey said the Nursing 
Education Center will allow the 
College's three nursing 
degree programs to be 
centrally located on the same 
campus site for the first time. 

Currently, the associate 
degree in nursing program is 
located at the LSU Medical 
Center on East Kings Highway 
in Shreveport, and the bac- 
calaureate degree and the 
graduate and research 
programs are located at 1 800 
Warrington Place in 
Shreveport. 

The relocation of all nursing 
programs at one site will make 
possible positive changes in 
class scheduling flexibility, 
instructional capabilities for 
faculty, assisted and self- 
learning resource use by 
students and communication 
within the College of Nursing 
and with the University. 




Eight heads are 

better than one 

An example of the many 
varied forms of art now on 
display in the Orville Han- 
chey Gallery of the A.A. 
Fredericks Center. 



YOUR CHANCE TO SHINE 

SAB'S ANNUAL 
LADY OF THE BRACELET 

PAGEANT 

ipipipipipipipipipipipipipipipipip^ 

March 22, 1985 
A.A. Fredericks Auditorium 
Theme: "A Night On Broadway" 
MC: Miss LA 1985 Anita Whitaker 

Sign Up In Rm. 214 

Of The Student Union 



Vol.73, No. 14 CURRENT SAUCE Jan. 29, 1985 



Page 5 



I 



Faculty works on display at Library 



Numerous articles and 
reviews written by University 
faculty members and 
published in national and state 
journals in the past three years 
are now on display in the 
media and serials division of 
Watson Library. 
"It is a very wide range of 
topics, and it is interesting to 
see what they have written" 
said Jody Charter, division 
head of the writings which will 
be on display through Feb. 
28. 

"By displaying the published 
works on the serials counter," 
she stated, "we hope to bring 
more recognition for the 
writing that our faculty is 
doing. Students especially, 
are very curious about their 
teachers, so it provides 
students with some in- 
formation. It also gives our 
faculty a chance to let other 
people know what they are 
interested in." 

The display features the 
writings of Northwestern 
president Dr. Joseph J. Orze; 
Dr. Fred Gies, dean of the 



College of Education; and Dr. 
Susan Molstad, an assistant 
professor who specializes in 
the psychology of sports and 
motor learning. 

Also in the exhibit are 
writings by Dr. Dean F. 
Johnson, associate professor 
of sociology; Dr. William A. 
Kritsonis, associate professor 



of education; Fraser B. 
Snowden, associate professor 
of philosophy; Dr. William A. 
Poe, professor of history; Dr. 
Maureen McHale, assistant 
professor of psychology; and 
Abby Landry, reference and 
online service librarian. 

On display with the faculty- 



written articles and reviews 
will be issues of the Southern 
Studies journal which was 
founded and has been 
published for several years by 
NSU. 

"This exhibit will show the 
range of the kinds of historical 
articles that Southern Studies 
contains and will bring at- 



tention to the journal's 
prestigious contributors, who 
are all scholars in their chosen 
fields," said Miss Charter. 

Forthcoming at Watson 
Library, she said, is a display 
focusing on the books that 
have been published by the 
NSU Press. 



Edwards disappoints LAE president 



The president of the' state's 
largest teachers' organization 
on Monday expressed 
disappointment that 
organizers of the Governor's 
Conference on Education did 
not allow the state's educators 
a more prominent role at the 
educational forum. 

Virginia Budd of Opelousas, 
a classroom teacher with 28 
years of experience, notes 
that very little provision was 
made to allow practicing 
classroom teachers to attend 
the meetinq. She savs 



NAVY NURSING: 
2 CAREERS IN 11 



teachers were not chosen to 
serve on the panels or to make 
addresses to the conference. 

"It is a shame that the 
governor did not use this rare 
opportunity, when persons 
from all segments of society 
were present, to present a 
more positive view of public 
education," she said. "During 
the campaign, Governor 
Edwards said many times that 
public education wasn't as bad 
as people seem to think it is. 
The conference, sadly, 
reinforced the view that 



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IT'S NOT JUST A JOB, IT'S AN ADVENTURE, 



education is of poor quality. 

"Speakers presented an 
unbalanced view of public 
schools, criticizing the 
teaching profession. One 
speaker said that teachers 
consciously conspire to keep 
students from learning so they 
can have jobs! Such a notion is 
not only ludicrous - it defames 
the many dedicated teachers 
in Louisiana classrooms who 
certainly aren't in the public 
schools for the money," said 
Budd. 

"The conference put the 
spotlight on self-proclaimed 
experts on education reform 
who, in many cases, are 
promoting schemes that have 
proved unworkable in the 
past," said Budd. 

"When LAE leaders sought 
to get permission for more 



teachers to participate in the 
conference, we were told that 
registration was closed. We 
were told at the same time, 
however, that exceptions to 
this rule had been made for 
certain business persons who 
wished to attend. While we 
encourage the interest shown 
by business representatives, 
we certainly feel that it was 
unfair for teachers to have 
been discouraged from at- 
tending a meeting where 
public education was to be 
discussed," concluded the 
LAE president. 

The LAE President also 
expressed concern that there 
was not more of an effort to 
involve parents and students 
in the conference since they 
are directly affected by 
decisions made concerning 
public education. 



Teenage Suicide Workshop 
Scheduled for Warrington 



A one-day workshop on 
teenage suicide will be offered 
this Saturday in Shreveport by 
the Division of Continuing 
Education. The workshop will 
be held at NSU nursing 
campus at 1800 Warrington 
Place.. 

The Workshop session is 
from 8:30 to 1 1 :45 a.m. It is 



open to the public and to 
teachers participating in the 
Professional Improvement 
Program. The registration fee 
is $15. 

Dian Deckbar-Snowden, a 
clinical social worker for the 
Natchitoches Parish Mental 
Health Clinic, will be the 
workshop instructor. 




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.fan 9Q 10PC riippCKJT CAiirc \ln\ T> * 4 

Jan. 29, 1 985 CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73, No. 1 4 



University and military cooperate in Alexandria 



It's not Mars - It's an NSU branch campus 



By Ricky Moore 

Staff Writer 

A green machine tears itself 
away from its home planet 
while another is prepared by 
little green men for its journey. 
Located 100 yards from this 
activity, inside a brown 
building about the size of a 
high school gymnasium, is a 
branch of Northwestern State 
University. 

Where is this place? No it's 
not Mars; it is NSU at England 
Air Force Base in Alexandria. 
You never knew it was there. 
Don't feel bad, most people 
don't, even though it has been 
there for 1 4 years. 

It is run by Stan Gallien with 
help from two graduate 
assistants and three student 
workers. Gallien says that his 
job "involves the coordination 
of all University activities in the 
central Louisiana area." 

The branch serves ap- 
proximately 500 un- 
dergraduate students per 
semester and 575 graduate 
students taking courses in the 
Alexandria/Pineville area. 

"Northwestern has an 
enrollment of a little over six 
thousand," he said. "Ap- 
proximately one thousand of 
those students are in the 
central Louisiana area taking 
classes." 

At this time there are three 
degrees offered at EAFB. 
"We offer all course work 
required for the associate's in 
General Studies, the 
bachelor's in General Studies, 



and the bachelor's in Business 
Administration," says Gallien. 

Each semester is divided 
into two eight week terms; 
term A and term B. The branch 
offers approximately 25 
courses each term. Most of 
the courses start at either 
4:30 p.m. or 6 p.m. The 4:30 
p.m. courses are one-and- 
one-half hours long and meet 
four days a week. The 6 p.m. 
courses are three hours long 
and meet on Monday/Wed- 
nesday or Tuesday /Thursday. 

When asked how long it 
would take a person to get his 
bachelor's degree at this 
branch, Gallien replied, "Well, 
that would depend on his work 
schedule. Keep in mind that 
probably 98 percent of our 
student body works full time. 
So usually they take either 
three or six hours each eight 
week term." 

He continued, "If a student 
is able to take six hours during 
each of our five, eight week 
terms, then he can earn 30 
semester hours in a calendar 
year. He can complete his 
degree in four years." Gallien 
said that not many people do 
this since it would require 
them to attend school three 
hours a night, four nights a 
week. 

Although the undergraduate 
program is designed primarily 
for the military, 65 percent of 
the students are non-military. 
Gallien said that the policy 
toward civilians taking courses 
on the base is: "The military 
have first choice; military 



dependents and Department 
of Defense employees have 
second choice; and civilians 
are considered on a space 
available basis." 

He added, "Thus far we 
have never had to turn anyone 
away." According to Gallien, 
there are usually ten to twenty 
students from the Nat- 
chitoches campus that take 
courses at England each 
semester. 

Gallien said, "The University 
has a contract, which is called 
a "Memorandum of Un- 
derstanding," with the Air 
Force, in which they agree to 
provide us with the physical 
facilities out of which to 
operate our programs which 
they request that we have 
here." 

He continued, "They have 
been very generous. We have 
had a very good working 
relationship; for example, we 
do not have to pay rent for our 
office space or our classroom 
space, which is' really a 
financial savings for the 
university." 



Gallien has some definite 
plans for the future of the 
campus. He said, "One of the 
immediate things that we hope 
to do is increase our capacity 
in computer science by 
acquiring more hardware." 

He continued, "Another 
goal is to secure full time 
faculty assigned to this 
campus. I can foresee in the 



NSU SUNBATHERS 

Call: Tun 352-5340 
Mike: 352-1995 
Bus.: 352-1999 

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In Ft. Lauderdale 
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Vol. 73, No. 14 CURRENT SAUCE Jan. 29, 1985 



Page 7 



Straight-A Honor List Names 1 40 Students 



One hundred and forty 
students have been named to 
the Straight A Honor List for 
the fall semester. 

Dr. T.P. Southerland, vice- 
president of academic affairs, 
said Straight A Honor students 
must be enrolled full-time at 
the university and must make 
A's in all academic courses 
pursued. 

Of the 1 40 students named 
to the Straight A Honor List, 
42 were in the College of 
Education and Behavioral 
Sciences; 24 in the College of 
Nursing; 20 in the College of 
Business and Applied 
Sciences; 25 in the College of 
Arts and Sciences and 29 in 
the College of Basic Studies 
and Associate Programs. 

The following area students 
were named to the fall 
semester Straight A Honor 
List: 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS 
AND APPLIED SCIENCES 

James Morgan, Pineville; 
Sandra L. Fortenberry, Susan 
C. Fortenberry, Shreveport; 
Betty J. Deans, Campti; 
Thomas Goss, Cammie L. 
Salter, Jay Todtenbier, Patty 
O'Quinn Varnado, Nat- 
chitoches; Rene L. Alejandro, 
Lecompte; Janet Sue Joyner, 
Neil Kinn, Pineville; Alan 
Rushing, Rubey Stinebrickner, 
Many; Paula M. Rubin, 
Opelousas; Kimberly Tollett, 



Slidell; Majosetina Lapus, 
Linda Rojas, Ft. Polk; Sherry 
Maderia, Leesville; Sandra 
Gass, New Llano, John M. 
Flanagan, Montgomery. 
COLLEGE OF ARTS 
AND SCIENCES 
Michael Miguez, Ragley; Carla 
S. Roberts, Saline; Debra 
Moreau, Eileen Ray, Bossier 
City; Christina E. Bar- 
berousse, Shreveport; 
Elizabeth Corley, Nancy 
Dallas, Winnsboro; Carol 
Baker, Scott Burt, Indiana 
Gammage, Jacqueline 
Leonard, Kim S. Lott, Charlton 
J. Matovsky, Raymond J. 
Metoyer, Natchitoches John 
Dyer, Alexandria; Jeffrey 
Thompson, Pineville; Jimmy 
Sandefur, Coushatta; Mary 
McCormic, Many; Sherry 
Barker, Fayetteville, Tenn.; 
Monica Fuglaar, Houma; 
Sharon Knarr, Anacoco; Diane 
M. Fischer,, Ft. Polk; Jerry R. 
Bolton, Craig E. Forque, 
Leesville; Jarvis Shaw, Cotton 
Valley; Pamela Purser, 
Winnfield. 



COLLEGE OF BASIC 
STUDIES AND 
ASSOCIATE PROGRAMS 

Michael Baker, DeRidder; 
Bobbi Stark, Sugartown; 
Sandra A. Sullivan, Saline; 
James S. Parker, Shreveport; 
Howard Moore, Ukiah, Calif.; 



Hsiao-Yu Chen, China; William 
C. Bankston, Carole Smith, 
Baton Rouge; James 
Sylvester, Ville Platte; Kiyomi 
Takahashi, Japan; Penny 
Brandt, Richard Chancellor, 
Cynthia Doyal, Lynn Estes, 
Jr., Daniel Graham, Timothy 
Lasseter, Jodi Sibley, Nat- 
chitoches; Karen E. Kin- 
berger, Ricky V. Moore, Billy 
G. Stroud, Franklin Wilson, 
Alexandria; Richard J. Love, 
Pineville; Patricia SSanmiguel, 
Florien; Kathryn Lonadier, 
Anacoco; Elizabeth Thomas, 
DeRidder; Patricia Bonfanti, 
Ft. Polk; John Hi, Hornbeck; 
Daphne Guenther, Sandra 
Snelson, Leesville. 

COLLEGE OF NURSING 
Dennis C. Cousin, 
DeQuincy; Audrey Brown, 
Kathryn Cryer, Lois Graham, 
Bossier City; Gloria Eaton, 
Haughton; Debra K. Allgood, 
Rosemary Barker, Sherrie 
Bonner, Catherine Hollen- 
bach, Lisa Horn, Sandra King, 
Janice L. Leatherwood, 
Valerie Palmere Metsger, 
Pamela D. Warmack, 
Shreveport; Christina Pet- 
tinicchi, Grand Cane; Pamela 
McNabb, Baton Rouge; Judy 
Hailey, Marshall, TX.; 
Catherine Hughes, Ruston; 
Denise Kruse, Gainesville, 
Missouri; Martha Clark, 
Melrose; Mary Olsen, Nat- 
chitoches; Sandra Timm, New 



Uijjfortanatel^ this is as 
close as some people 
ever get to a sense oftjod 

II you l>riirve ilu-rc should In- 
mniv to life* llttlfl the \voi\hi|> ol objit Lv conic ami join us in ihc joy 
ami frlJutaslup of CajBd in the K|))\co|>al Church. 
Iht I | jim i ip.il ( lunch 




Orleans; Peggy Wyatt, Pitkin; 
Rebecca Murphy, Minden. 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 
AND BEHAVIORAL 
SCIENCES 

Nancy C. Hanley, Church 
Point; Lydia G. Brewer, 
DeRidder; Tammy Hill, Castor; 
Melonie A. Evans, Stacey M. 
Johnson, Bossier City; Donald 
Bihm, Shreveport; Robin E. 
Yarbrough, Jonesville; Leann 
Gray, Keatchie; Wanda 
Verrette, Mamou; Sharen 
Doyle, Metairie; Hellen Bruce, 
William Perdue, Jena; Sharla 
N. Foshee, Trout; Joel Palmer, 
Campti; Marsha Birdwell, 
Marthaville; Mary Sue Antilley, 
Natchez; Ted Beagley, Tandy 



Brown, Laura Culpepper, 
Cynthia Dangeleisen, Nancy 
Green, Joseph Maggio, 
Sylvester Roque, Lois Shields, 
Cleta Tucker, Kathy Starr, 
Natchitoches; Alicia 
Boyd, Provencal; Carla 
Bertani, Janice A. Duggan, 

Richard A. Roscoe, 
Alexandria; Carol Smith, 
Woodworth; Pearl Lee, Muriel 
Lucius, Lucy Thompson; 
Florien; Michelle Gilbreth, 
Marjorie Tarpley, Many; 

Diedra Farris, Patrick Mer- 
chant, Mary E. Servello, 
Anacoco; Debbie Adams, 
Angela K. Bradford, Leesville; 
Phyliss Stephens, Rosepine. 



Herpetologist awarded $1 , 1 85 



University herpetologist 
Dr. Kenneth L. Williams has 
been awarded a $1,185 
research grant from NSU to 
conduct his fourth her- 
petological investigation of 
cloud forests in Honduras. 

The three-week ex- 
pedition to inventory the 



amphibians and reptiles 
inhabiting four of the cloud 
forests in Honduras is 
scheduled to begin Aug. 1 . 
Previous trips to the 
Central American country 
were made by Williams in 
1980, 1982 and 1984. 




Hot Rod 



Demon basketball's promotion this year is the chance to 
win the 1985 Plymouth Turismo. Four basketball shots can 
give a lucky student the car... 





ULT BALLET CLASSES 



For Information Contact: 
Gwen Reese School Of Dance' 
105 Isadore St. 



Also Adult Tap And Jazz Classes 



Phone 
357-8641 





8 



Texas 
94 



Where Are We From? 



Vol. 73,No,i|. sA ui 



A complete breakdown by parish, state, and nj 



Arkansas 
35 



rr 

I 

CADDO. 



1 



UNION ! MOREHOUSE / ^ 

\ L 9 r^. 2 | 6 (// 

(WEBSTER ( LINCOLN 1 1 S vM j 

727 bossier i 62 j 16 ' ./ ( / <-^ _ 

\270 \ J M i j • OUACHITA / RICHLAND ( 



r 



DESOTO \ \ 
RED RIVErV 

124 \ 97 



BIENVILLE 



T 



I 



I JACKSON 

16 

WINN 

185 



\ 



37 



— < 
i 

, , L.: 



/ 

! NATCHITOCHESS 



N 129 



VERNON 

791 



969 

RAPIDES 




8 s " . < 

| CALDWELL \ FRANKLIN < 



—' < LA SALLE ' 

GRANT I 



> 106 

v. 



CATAHOULA 
s 

r • v i... CONCORDIA 




Mississippi 
24 




rSj- AVOYELLES ( u ^ 



-J— \ 1 

ALLEN I EVANGELINE, 



I 

1 \ 



(" 



TANGIPAHOA 

'l '.am 

7 



^FELICIANA,-' EAST 
5 J 2 / FELICIANA' c T 
7 ) ST. LANDRY ) PoTnT ^^C|^f^^i*f^J 
J 41 ! COUPEE A BATON ' j 
i — t-u*»-r ^ ROUGE 

—\ \ A v j 42 V LIVINGSTONX 

JEFFERSON ACADIA L ^ 3 J V_ J, J^. « 

DAVIS 1 \ * S — -f > *» V 

i 9 r $£< 2 /ascension,,, r 

13/ >r 16 -ST. MARTIN <h BE RVILLEV 7 ST. JOHN 

IBERIA JT \ 

VERMILLION 

2 



ST. JAMES' 2 ^ 

"S 2 > V 
S..rJ ST. CHARLES 





Figures based on fall registration and obtained 
from Office of Institutional Research and Planning 



Cover Story 




Out-of-State 



Alabama 

Arizona 

California 

Colorado 

Florida 

Georgia 

Iowa 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Kentucky 

Maryland 

Maine 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

North Carolina 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Pennsylvania 

Puerto Rico 

Tennessee 

Virginia 

Wisconsin 

West Virginia 




4 
2 
5 
1 

13 
3 
3 

15 
1 
2 
3 
1 
3 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
1 
3 
8 
9 
4 
1 
2 



Fr>rf»i<rn f"o 1 1 ntrSot 




Bahamas 


3 


Bangladesh 


3 


Brazil 


4 


Brunei 


2 


Cameron 


1 


Canada 


4 


Chile 


2 


China, People's Rep. of 


2 


Columbia 


8 


Ecuador 


2 


El Salvador 


5 


Guatemala 


1 


Honduras 


7 


Hong Kong 


6 


India 


1 


Indonesia 


8 


Iran 


7 


Japan 


5 


Jordan 


3 


Kuwait 


9 


Lebanon 


4 


Malaysia 


4 


Mexico 


1 


Nigeria 


9 


Pakistan 


1 


Panama 


3 


Peru 


1 


Philippines 


1 


Singapore 


1 


Spain 


1 


Syria 


1 


Taiwan 


1 


Thailand 


4 


Trinidad and Tobago 


1 


United Arab Emirates 


2 


Venezuela 


42 


Virgin Islands 


1 


West Germany 


1 


West Malaysia 


1 



Total Louisiana 5,753 

Total Out-of-State 256 

Total Foreign Country.... 169 
GRAND TOTAL 6,178 



Jan. 29, 1985 CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73, No. 14 



10 



Close-Up 



Alcohol: The Campus Dilemma 

Two schools try to curb alcohol usage 





Concern over alcohol abuse and drunk 
drivers has prompted the national drive to 
raise the drinking age and individual campus 
efforts to reduce alcohol consumption. 

But those efforts sometimes backfire, as 
students move their social life - and drinking 
habits - off campus, potentially increasing the 
incidence of drunk driving. 

Two innovative programs now target that 
specific problem: transporting students safely 
back to campus. Both were created by student 
organizations. 

At Bryant College, in Smithfield, R.I., "This 
Ride's For You" was created on the "safe-ride" 
model used at many American high schools. 
Bryant student volunteers staff a "ride line" 
from 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. on weekends. 

"If students have been drinking and don't 
want to drive, or if they don't want to ride with 
another student who has been drinking, they 
can get a ride back to campus," says Noreen 
Mattis, health educator and program adviser. 

The program is organized as an Explorer Post 
solely to obtain liability insurance under the Boy 
Scouts of America, says Mattis. "Liability was 
one of our major concerns," she says. 
Plenty of Volunteers 

Obtaining volunteers to staff "This Ride's For 
You" hasn't been a concern. Over 80 
students, including one entire fraternity, 
agreed to work two evening shifts each per 
semester. Other students are doing fun- 
draisers to help pay for the CB equipment that 
links cars with the base, and cover other costs. 

"We very much wanted to have students 
helping students, and that's exactly what this 
program does," says Mattis. 

From its first weekend of operation the 
program has received calls. They average 
about two per night, but have been increasing: 
a recent Saturday brought in nine calls for 



rides. 

Tulane University faced a very different 
student drinking problem. With a drinking age 
of 18, and the New Orleans French Quarter 
nearby, trying to discourage students from 
drinking becomes very difficult, says Billy 
Ripner, SGA president. 

The SGA sponsored an alcohol awareness 
program that distributed 4,000 pamphlets on 
"How to Drink Responsibly," drawn largely 
from BACCHUS. Thos same tips on partying 
were added to the freshman handbook. SGA is 
also showing a 15-minute alcohol awareness 
movie once-a-month prior to "major movies" 
shown on weekend nights. "That gives us a 
captive audience of about 2,000 students," 
says Ripner. 

Protecting the students 

But to deal with the reality of student 
drinking, and to reduce the likelihood of drunk 
driving, SGA created "The Dry Run," a shuttle 
bus which begins operation this month, 
stopping at three locations near bars where 
students frequent. The shuttle, actually an 
SGA van, will run the half -hour and hour from 
1 1 p.m. to 2 a.m., and will provide free rides 
back to the Tulane campus. 

SGA is spending about $1 00 a week to pay a 
driver and buy gas, while the university is 
providing liability coverage. 

"Once we get it running and they can see its 
value, we expect the bars to begin paying for 
it," says Ripner. If demand exceeds what one 
van can handle, two other SGA vans will be 
used, he says. 

"Even if students don't start using the vans 
right away, we think the program will be 
successful," he says. "If they just see the van 
passing once every half-hour, it will be a 
reminder. We'll be making a statement about 
responsible drinking." 



On-campus 'dry' bar proves successful 



The Wooden Nickel, Moorehead State 
University of Minnesota's unique on-campus 
dry bar, is a popular, if not quite a financial, 
success after its first quarter. 

Student reaction to the non-alcoholic 
nightspot is "really very good," according to 
Mark Ziebarth, student senate vice-president at 
MSU. He says The Wooden Nickel is now 
patronized mostly by freshmen and 
sophomores, because Minnesota's drinking 
age is 1 9, but is gradually drawing more juniors 
and seniors. 

"I'm an RA with a lot of freshmen on my floor 
and because they can't drink, a lot of times 
they don't have a place to go," he says. 

Ziebarth labels The Wooden Nickel a suc- 
cess. "They seem to be doing a lot of business 
and making a lot of money," he says. "A lot of 
people go to the bars just to dance so it's 
almost the same. Its also a good place to go if 
you just want to escape the smoke and bar 
atmosphere." 

Kathy Allen, Moorhead's director of student 
activities, says the bar is "doing quite nicely" 
and "drawing a fairly regular crowd. When we 
first opened, we were not quite ready with out 



promotional ideas," Allen says, "but we're 
getting things worked out." 

The Wooden Nickel has made some minor 
changes, she adds. New items, such as ice 
cream drinks and non-alcoholic margaritas, 
have been added to the menu and evening 
hours were changed from 6 to midnight to 8 to 
1 a.m. 

Allen says The Wooden Nickel finished the 
first quarter about 2 percent below the financial 
break-even point but that she expects the 
winter quarter to break even and perhaps even 
show a profit. 

Low-cost programming is the key, Allen says. 
Rather than big -name entertainment, MSU is 
using creative events such as student-made 
dance tapes and a Wooden Nickel version of 
"The Dating Game" to draw crowds without 
spending much money 

"We think there's enough potential that we're 
continuing The Wooden Nickel," Allen says. 
"Right now about 30 percent of out students 
drink little or no alcohol... (and) all indications 
are that the drinking age will increase to 21 
within the year. That should increase our 
'captive' audience." 





USA ON- 
CAMPUS 



A SIGN OF THE TIMES: The 

Student Senate at the U. 1 
Southern California 
unanimously passed | 
resolution to change one line 
of the USC fight song from 
"Our men fight on to victory" 
to "Our teams fight on to 
victory." The change was 
made to recognize, and focus 
more attention on, women's 
athletics. 

COMPLAINTS OF 
HARASSMENT were filed with 
the U. of Kansas affirmative 
action office against three 
students and the Young 
Americans for freedom by the 
Gay and Lesbian Services of' 
Kansas. GLSOK says that 
"Fagbusters" T-shirts and a 
petition calling for a 
referendum to ban GLSOK 
from campus is harassment. 

GREEK HOUSES FACE A $5 
MILLION SUIT which charges 
that since traditionally white 
fraternities and sororities at 
the U. of Arkansas use state 
land and facilities, they are 
violating the Civil Rights Act, 
which prevents state funds 
from being used for activities 
that discriminate against race. 

WOMEN ARE DEMANDING 

MEN at Barry U. About 300 of 
the 375 on-campus residents 
of the small Catholic college 
signed a petition demanding 
that rules limiting dormitory 
visits by members of the 
opposite sex be lifted. The 
dorms are now open to men 
during special hours on 
Wednesdays, Fridays, and 
weekends only. 

A WOMAN WHO WAS 
RAPED in 1 980 by men who 

forced their way into her 
Florida A&M U. dorm room is 
suing the Board of Regents. 
She contends that university 
officials failed to provide 
proper safety measures, 
which should have prevented 
the crime, and is suing tj* 
Regents because they head 
Florida's universities. The 
Regents settled out of court in 
a similar case stemming from 3 
1981 rape and murder of 3 
woman in a Florida A&M dof" 
room. 

A BOOMING CAMPHj 
BUSINESS? Fastf0 ° h 
delivery is making good on tn 
Indiana U. campus. A 
pany called "Fast Breaks 
delivers quarter-pounde^ 
tacos, or other treats ^ 
local drive-ins for one doH» 
above the meal's cost, 
owner says his service 
popular, particularly on nif 
the cafeterias serve liver 
onions. 



Not 

Ov 
Picti 
Colis 



Pi 



The 
School 
will be 
the A./ 

The 
oldest 
tournar 
being 
Departr 



X/rtl 71 fcls* <A r»|IDDCHTC»"nr 



Vol. 73, No. 14 CURRENT SAUCE I Jan. 29 , 1 985 




Page 11 



Experience Needed 
For 'Camelot' Role 



Not exactly sold out... 

Over the holiday break, Demon basketball drew some of its smallest crowds ever. 
Pictured is an example • when the Demons met NLU only 300 people dotted the 5,000-seat 
Coliseum. 



A search will be conducted 
on Monday, for an ex- 
perienced actress and singer 
to play the part of Guenevere 
in this spring's production of 
Camelot, the last of the 
famous Lerner and Loewe 
musicals. 

Auditions to select the 
leading lady in the great 
Broadway hit will begin at 3 
p.m. in the Auditorium of the 
A.A. Fredericks Center. The 
auditions include call backs, if 
necessary. 

Ray Schexnider, associate 
professor of theatre and 
director of Camelot, said 
women interested in 
auditioning for the role of 
Guenevere must attend the 
auditions with a prepared 
three-minute monologue and 
also sing a song of their own 



choice. Applicants must 
provide sheet music for the 
accompanist, who will be 
provided by the University. 

"She has to be an ex- 
perienced actress as well as a 
singer," said Schexnider. 
"The reason for this important 
qualification is that we have an 




Prep Speech Tournament Set for Friday 



The 49th annual NSU High 
School Speech Tournament 
will be conducted Friday, in 
the A.A. Fredericks Center. 

The event, which is the 
oldest university-sponsored 
tournament in the state, is 
king sponsored by the 
Department of Theatre-Media 



Arts and directed by Dr. 
DeAnn McCorkle, associate 
professor of speech. 

Sanctioned by the Louisiana 
High School Speech League, 
the NSU High School Speech 
Tournament is a qualifying 
competition for the Louisiana 
State High School Tournament 



of Champions in April. 

Registration for the tour- 
nament's more than 400 
student participants 
representing some 25 high 
schools throughout the state 
will begin at 8 a.m. in the Fine 
Arts Auditorium. A general 
assembly is scheduled for 9 



a.m., and competition begins 
at 9:30 a.m. The awards 
ceremonies will be conducted 
in the auditorium at 8:30 p.m. 

Dr. McCorkle said novice, 
advanced and tournament 
sweepstakes awards will be 
presented to the top school in 
each division . 




s 



This Week 
at the 
Student Body 



TUESDAY 

Winter Wonderland party 

sponsored by Sigma Kappa 

WEDNESDAY 

$5 Beer Bust! 
$1 Tom Collins 
$1 .50 bar drinks 
EVERY WEDNESDAY NIGHT!!! 

THURSDAY 

Bathroom Boogie 
and Trivial Pursuit 



FRIDAY 

* 'Take Me Out to the Ball Game" 

sponsored by Demon Bat Girls 



WANTED: Textbooks fori 
Journalism 306, Effective 
Public Relations, 5th 
Edition, by CutJip & Center. 
Students now enrolled want 
to beg, borrow or buy 
copies. Class meets TT, 1 1 
a. m., Kyser 207. Please 
bring books to that class or 
contact Mr. Presson, Kyser 
Hall 225E. Phone 5339, as 
soon as possible. 



experienced singer and actor 
who is coming in from New 
York to play King Arthur. So, 
we are looking for a 
Guenevere to play opposite 
him." 

The Arthurian legend, as 
presented by the Reader's 
Encyclopedia, has it that 
Arthur's wife was Guenevere, 
whose romance with Lancelot, 
the king's most valiant knight, 
was the reason for the ruin of 
Arthur. 

When the musical comedy 
of Camelot opened on 
Broadway in New York in 
1960, Julie Andrews played 
the stage role of Guenevere, 
but in the 1967 world- 
premiere of the motion picture 
version the leading lady was 
portrayed by Vanessa 
Redgrave. 

University performances of 
Camelot are scheduled for 
April 25-27, at 7:30 p.m. in 
the Fine Arts Auditorium. 



NORTHWESTERN SWEATERS 

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Jan. 29, 1985 CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73, No. 14 



12 




You better move... 

Senior Jerry Harris takes the ball to the hoop in last week's 
double overtime win over the Bearkats of Sam Houston. NSU 
improved to 2-1 6 with the win. 

Hall of Fame Selects 
Seven Sports Greats 



Seven of the Bayou state's 
sports greats have been 
selected as 1985 inductees 
to the Louisiana Sports Hall of 
Fame, located in Prather 
Coliseum. 

Highlighting this year's 
group is Eddie Robinson, head 
football coach at Grambling 
State for the last 42 years. 
And for the first time, a 
woman, golfer Clifford Ann 
Creed, has been selected to 
the shrine. 

Other inductees are former 
National League batting 
champ Ralph Garr, Oakland 
Raider defensive back Willie 
Brown, LSU and Cincinatti 
Bengal star Tommy Casanova, 
LSU track record-setter Matt 
Gordy, and the late Jim 
Corbett, who served as LSU 
athletic director for 1 2 years. 

Induction ceremonies will be 



held in Natchitoches this 
summer, increasing mem- 
bership to 101. The Hall of 
Fame was established in 
1958, and moved to NSU in 
1972. 

Many other prominent 
sports stars have been 
selected to the prominent 
group, including Billy Cannon, 
John David Crow, Charley 
McClendon, Bob Pettit, Willis 
Reed, Jerry Stovall, Y.A. 
Tittle, and Tank Younger. 

Corbett, who will be 
honored posthumously, will be 
represented this summer by 
family members. The other six 
inductees will attend the 
ceremonies. 

Robinson has spent his 
entire 42-year coaching 
career at Grambling State. In 
see 'Hall of Fame' 
on page 1 4 



Sports 

Demons up record to 2-1 6 
With double OT win, 77-72 



The Demon basketball team 
halted its 13-game losing 
streak Thursday night with an 
exciting 77-72 double 
overtime upset win over Gulf 
Star foe Sam Houston State. 

With the win, Northwestern 
raised its record to 2-1 6. The 
Bearkats of Sam Houston fell 
to 9-8 with the loss. 

Earlier in the evening, the 
Lady Demons did what they've 
been doing all year - winning. 
The ladies trounced Grambling 
State's Lady Tigers, 97-71 . 

The Lady Demons- climbed 
to 11-3 on the season. Two 
of the three losses have come 
to number five-ranked Nor- 
theast. The other Lady 
Demon setback was a 1 01 -99 
loss at Alcorn State. 

Senior Jerry Harris led the 



Demons against the Bearkats 
with 24 points. Sylvester 
Smith added 16, while 
freshman sensation George 
Jones pumped in 12. Dwight 
Moody scored 1 points. 

The game was tied at 53-53 
at the end of regulation play 
when Sam Houston's Bruce 
Hodges went the length of the 
court to wipe out a two-point 
NSU lead. Northwestern 
pulled ahead in the second 
overtime period with key free 
throw shooting to ice their 
first-ever Gulf Star basketball 
win. 

The Lady Demon contest 
wasn't the nailbiter the men's 
game was. Northwestern is 
currently ranked as the 
number two scoring team in 
the nation, and Coach Pat 
Pierson's troops took the 



game's first basket and never 
looked back. 

For Northwestern, the entire 
team scored, led by freshman 
Gussie Leonard's 18 points, 
and followed by 1 4 points for 
Teressa Thomas. Monica Lee 
had a career-high 12 points 
against GSU, while Annie 
Harris accounted for 10 
points. 

Seven other Lady Demons 
scored during the contest and 
Kristy Harris added an NSU- 
record 13 assists to her 12 
rebounds and six points. 

Last night, the men hosted 
Southeastern and the women 
hosted Southwest Texas 
State in a doubleheader at the 
Coliseum. 

Details were unavailable at 
press time. 



Basketball Crowd Flips Over 
Bud Light's Gymnastic Group 



by Lance Ellis 

Contributor 

The Bud Light Daredevils 
provided an entertaining show 
at halftime of the NSU-Sam 
Houston men's game on 
Thursday. They displayed an 
assortment of tricks, 
somersaults, and dunks. 

The Daredevils performed 
their stunts with the use of 
mini-trampolines for greater 
height in the air, and padded 
mats for a soft landing. A few 
spectators in the crowd of 
about 1 ,300 in the Coliseum 
were invited to join the act by 
allowing the Daredevils to 
somersault over them. 

The group is a three-man 
team which includes Mack 
Hirshberg and brothers Guy 
and Ty Cobb. They got their 
start while Ty was a student at 
the University of Mississippi. 
Ty would perform his routine 
solo at halftime of the Ole Miss 
basketball games. 

When people copying Ty's 
routine began to get hurt 
jumping off of mini- 



trampolines, the Southeastern 
Conference banned mini- 
trampolines from athletic 
events within the conference. 

So Ty, joined by his brother 
Guy, took his act elsewhere 
and began performing at 
National Basketball 
Association games. Last year, 
Anheuser-Busch agreed to 
sponsor the Daredevils. It was 
at this time that Hirshberg 



joined the team. 

It has taken three years to 
perfect the act. Before 
basketball season the team 
spends two months of four 
hour workouts to prepare for 
their 75 scheduled ap- 
pearances. In addition to 
halftime shows, the trio 
been featured on PN 
Magazine and on ABC's That's 
Incredible!. 



SUPPORT THE 

LADY DEMONS! 
The ladies have two 
home games this week. 
See page 16 for times, 
and BE THERE! 



FURTHER REDUCTIONS 
ON REMAINING FALL 
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Vol. 73, No. 1 4 CURRENT SAUCE Jan. 29, 1 985 



Page 13 



Freshman already tops GSC scoring 

Gussie Leonard adjusting 
To college life, 'stardom' 



by Jay Miller 

Contributor 

"Mom, I'm doing okay." 

--Love, Gussie 

Mrs. Jean Myles of 417 
Daniel St. in Kenner should 
have a smile from ear to ear. 
Her daughter, Gussie Lee 
Leonard is making the tran- 
sition to college life. 

For those who haven't taken 
the step, don't underestimate 
it. Ask a student who has had 
the shock of having no one but 
yourself to rely on in im- 
mediate situations. Gussie is a 
freshman center on the 
women's basketball team and 
is making as smooth a tran- 
sition off the basketball court 
as she has on it. 

Leonard may be only a 
freshman, but she has gained 



much respect in her first 
games as a collegian. She 
helped lead the Lady Demons 
to their third straight Lady 
Pack Classic title in Reno, 
Nevada earlier this week. She 
poured in 34 points in the 
opening 86-84 thriller against 
Nevada-Reno and added 22 in 
the championship game with 
U.S. International. She added 
15 rebounds while being 
named the tournament MVP. 

But the refreshing, slim 6'1 " 
1 46-pounder is quick to point 
out it takes five players and 
those off the bench to win a 
ball game. 

Leonard is not new to the 
limelight. They restricted her 
No. 30 at Bonnabel High in 
Metairie. She scored 1,772 
points while her team went 




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1 1 2-9 in her four years and 
claimed a state title, a runners- 
up bid, semi-finalists spot 
another and a quarterfinalist 
showing. Now the two-time all- 
state MVP, two-time all-state 
selection, four-time all-district, 
Metro and City MVP and twice 
Converse All-American is 
learning the moves off the 
court as well. 

"You have to be serious 
with the books," said Leonard. 
"The key to successful 
classroom work is time." 

"The away games are hard 
on athletes because they can't 
give enough time to studies. 
It's not as easy as I thought it 
would be and I've had to 
adjust, learning to budget time 
as well as money wisely. 
That's been the biggest 
change, besides the classes. 
High school wasn't as dif- 
ficult." 

That has been the hardest 
part this season, not the 
opposition. Her 22.5 scoring 
average is tops in the Gulf Star 
Conference, she is second in 
field goal percentage at 62 
percent and fifth in reboun- 
ding. She leads the NSU team 
in rebounding with 8.8 boards 
per game. Leonard is part of a 
team that leads the nation in 
scoring, averaging 92-plus 
points per game. 

"I didn't think I'd be doing as 
well because I'm only a 
freshman and have alot to 
learn." she said. It's nice to 
hear that comment in sincerity 
when most athletes often 
don't believe but say it anyway 
because it looks good for their 
image. 

Junior guard Lonnie Banks 
had as much a hand in 
Leonard coming to Nor- 
thwestern as head Coach Pat 
Pierson. "Lonnie is from 
around my area back home 
(New Orleans) and she said 
the whole campus is relaxed 
and friendly. She's right. The 
friendliness of everyone at- 
tracted me to the school. 
Besides, Lonnie really liked 
Coach Pierson. She's a good 
coach. I think highly of her and 
Coach (James) Smith." 

While Banks helped to get 
her to NSU, Leonard credits 
teammate Val Williams with the 
biggest influence during 
games. Williams, a six foot 
junior from Colfax often calms 
the freshman down before big 
games, telling her to "play her 
own game." 

Amazing enough, the 
graceful Leonard wasn't in- 
terested in basketball until the 
eighth grade. "I was a tomboy 
early on," she said. "I played 




Gussie puts it up 

Freshman Gussie Leonard leads the Gulf Star Conference 
in total points, and has been a major factor in the Lady 
Demons' current 13-3 record. Leonard is a two-time AAAA 
all-state MVP and Converse All-American from Metairie's 
Bonnabel High. 



football until my younger 
brother, Irvin dragged me 
along to play one-on-one with 
him. I've liked it ever since and 
watch it as often as I can on 
television." 

How can NSU keep win- 
ning? "Hardwork at practice 
and at the games, Coach 
Pierson expects that of you," 
says Leonard. "I want to 
shape up my defense before 
the year is over. Everyone is 
good in college. Few players 
are intimidated." 



"We are a quick club and 
can fill it up in a hurry," said 
Leonard. "Everyone on our 
team can score. You can't just 
shut one or two off and shut us 
down." 

But Gussie has changed in 
one respect, mom. Don't buy 
her that group "Nucleus" 
cassette tape. "I like Prince 
now. A lot of people like his 
music at school." 

But he doesn't shoot as well 
as Gussie. 



Intramural spring 
schedule announced 



The intramural office opened 
its doors last week to get 
ready for the new semester. 
Intramural Director Diana 
"Tootie" Cary has a long list of 
activities planned for this 
spring. 

According to Cary, there are 
over 25 scheduled events for 
students to take part in this 
spring. One-on-one 
basketball, the first event of 



the year, was held last 
Tuesday. 

Also held last week was 
men's bowling on Monday. 
Women's bowling will be held 
Tuesday at 4 p.m. at Country 
Lanes bowling alley. 

A basketball officials clinic 
will be held Wednesday at 4 
p.m. at the Intramural Building, 
and a team captains meeting 
will be held Thursday at 5 p.m. 



Page 1 4 



Jan. 29, 1 985 CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73, No. 1 4 



Grayson leads Lady Demons past Sam Houston, 97-56 



The Lady Demons used a 
strong second half showing to 
outclass Sam Houston State's 
Ladykats, 97-56, on Saturday 
night. 

With a 41-31 halftime lead, 
the Lady Demons came out 
smoking in the second half. 
Thanks in large part to Linda 
Grayson, who scored 1 9 of 
her game high 23 points in the 
second period. 

NSU played solidly 
throughout most of the game. 
Every member of the team 
scored for the second con- 
secutive game. It was also the 
second in a row for ladies to 
score 97 points. 

Norhtwestern had as much 



as a 17-point lead in the first 
half when Sandy Pugh 
grabbed a rebound and put it 
back up for two points to give 
her team a 29-1 2 spread with 
6:59 left in the opening 
period. 

The Ladykats cut the margin 
to six with just over three 
minutes before intermission. 
The final halftime margin being 
ten. 

The Lady Demons poured it 
on in the last 20 minutes, 
shooting 58 percent from the 
floor and outscoring the 
Ladykats 56-25. NSU also 
outrebounded the opposition 
46-27. 

Besides Grayson's 23 



points, the Lady Demons got 
help from Lonnie Banks with 
20 and Gussie Leonard with 
10. Grayson also paced all 
players with 1 5 rebounds. 

NSU bettered its record to 
1 2-3 with its fourth con- 
secutive win and eighth in the 
last nine starts. 

The Lady Demons have 
scored at least 90 points in six 
games and possess the 
nation's second highest- 
scoring offense in women's 
basketball with an 87.7 point- 
per-game average. 

The Lady Demons boast a 
very balanced scoring attack 
with all five starters averaging 
in double figures. Freshman 



Hall of Fame 



continued from 
page 1 2 

1985, Robinson will probably 
attain win no. 324 at GSU and 
surpass the NCAA record of 
323 set by the late Bear 
Bryant of Alabama. 

Over the years, over 200 
Grambling players have en- 
tered a pro football league. 

Creed was the state's 
amateur women's golf champ 
in 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 
and 1961. Her lone loss 
came in the 1 960 finals. The 
native of Alexandria now is a 
club pro at a Sulphur country 
club. 

Garr spent 1 1 years in the 
majors with the Braves, White 
Sox, and Angels. He led the 
NL in batting with a .353 
average, and is nicknamed the 



"Roadrunner" because of 
blazing speed on the base 
paths. 

Brown, like Garr, spent his 
collegiate days at Grambling. 
He played the Broncos and 
Raiders and has been an 
assistant coach for the Los 
Angeles Raiders for the past 
three years. 

Casanova, an All-SEC back 
for three years at LSU, was an 
All- American in 1971. He 
played for six years with 
Cincinatti, and still ranks high 
in Bengal record books - both 
LSU's and Cincy's. 

Gordy was a member of the 
LSU's famed five-man national 
championship track team in 
1933. His 14-foot pole vault 
enabled the Tigers to win the 
title. 




Living Legend 

Coach Eddie Robinson of 
Grambling is just four wins 
shy of passing Bear Bryant 
of Alabama in becoming the 
all-time winningest football 
coach. This year, he was 
selected to the Louisiana 
Sports Hall of Fame. 



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standout, Leonard paces the 
squad with a 19.3 average, 
followed by Grayson's 18.7. 

Banks is next on the team at 
1 1 .4. Annie Harris and 
Teressa Thomas round out the 



top five with averages of 1 0.9 
and 10.7 respectively. 

The Lady Demons played 
Monday night and will play 
again Thursday and Saturday 
nights, both at home. 



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International Employment Directory 1984 



Vol. 73, No. 1 4 CURRENT SAUCE Jan. 29, 1 985 



Viewpoint 



15 



i 



Time for a change 

To begin the spring semester, word number eleven 
from the Demon Dictionary: 

Basketball - a sport at Northwestern that has, 
over the years, declined in support, prestige, and 
number of wins. 

Since basketball season began several weeks ago, 
there has been much campus talk about the progress 
of the NSU teams. The Lady Demons' success has 
excited most students. The men, on the other 
hand... 

The men's program has had just one winning 
season since 1 976-77. In the seven seasons since 
then, the Demons are 69-121. And this year 
promises to be one of the worst ever, recordwise. 
As of press time on Sunday, the team stood at 2-1 6. 
Admittedly, NSU has faced a difficult schedule thus 
far, facing Top Ten teams SMU, Louisiana Tech, and 
Oklahoma. But five Demon losses were by 25 points 
or more. A Division I school should be more com- 
petitive than that. 

There is little public relations or promotions 
surrounding the basketball programs - men and 
women. Maybe that's one reason our home crowds 
are so small this year. 

And like everything else, the program needs more 
student support. But it's hard to support a team that 
doesn't support the University. As many students 
are aware of, several members of the men's team 
were allegedly involved in a vandalism incident in 
Varnado Hall over the semester break. Damage done 
to the building was slight, and the housing office 
offered to move the men's team to Rapides, instead 
of the customary expulsion from residence halls. 

Instead, several phone calls were made to 
Shreveport newspapers, threating a Northwestern 
boycott of the upcoming Oklahoma game if the team 
was forced to change dorms. 

The childish behavior of one or more team mem- 
bers not only was embarassing to the athletic 
department, it was a disgrace to anyone associated 
w ith this University. Of course, it was not the entire 
team; it was just one or a few. Nevertheless, the 
Shreveport Times found it 'cute' enough to mention 
0n the front page of the sports section. The positive 
l,T, age conveyed by the Demon Dynamite promotion 
an d the success of the football team was damaged, if 
n ot destroyed, by the threatened "boycott." 

As a major sport, the men's basketball team is vital 
'° the success or failure of Northwestern athletics. 

berefore, changes must be made. Now. 

jt is obvious that the program is getting nowhere. In 
Private business, a company with a track record like 
n at of Demon basketball would be looking for a new 
°ss. And that's what must happen here. 

Coach Wayne Yates said midway through last 
ir ~ as °n that if the Demons did not show significant 
^ Dr ovement over the 6-22 record of a year ago, he 

° u 'd step down. Since Gulf Star competition is 

®aker than our early schedule, it will not be im- 

Ss ible to match or better last year's mark, or even 
s . n ^e conference. Should that happen, will it be a 

9n 'ficant improvement? No. 

the y ears Demon players and staff must pick up 
b P ' 6ces and rebuild a program that has been at the 
ott om for far too long. 



Doonesbury by garry trudeau 



excuse ysah.man. dont 

Me, did i Asm? Give in 

you say if you whim, 

\ something had a buwy! 

; tone? ogarbttb. 




P0NTL5T 
I Bee HIM PUSH 
YOUR. YOUAROUNP! 
PARDON? FI6HT BACK 1 . 



J 




FIGHT BACK? m^gr YOURMYS 
ALLH5 ttmm OF TERROR. 
WAMT5IS j msr ARB OVER! 
A CJ6AR- airf HEAR, PUNK? 
ETTEl . V 

lV 




SHOOT m/5 15 I PONT 

lW! CRAZY. WANT IT! 

SHOOT TAKBTHF f^^AY 

H/M! C16AR- fWMm, 

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Letter to the Editor 

Dear Editor 

My full name is Randolf Burt Fritz, but please feel free to call 
me Randy. It is my interest that I be able to reach out and be able 
to respond to as many as possible whether student or staff. 

I am now 30 years old. I was born on April 1 3, 1 954, in Wesi 
Germany. I graduated from the University of Bonn (West 
Germany) on June 1 7, 1 977. I hold a bachelor's degree in both 
Adult and Child Psychology, an arts degree in Human Behavior, 
and I speak three languages fluently. I have been in the United 
States since November, 1977. I came to the United States to 
live, work and to study. 

The education I received was more than I had expected and 
had ever asked for. I am a bold, open, honest and straight 
forward man. I do not play games, so I would like everyone to 
know that I am in the prison system at Buena Vista, Colorado. 
The reason is not a pretty story, but an honest one. The reason I 
am in the system is because I shot a guy who beat and raped a 
1 9-year-old woman. No, I did not kill him; he is very much alive. I 
am not in any way sorry for why I am in prison, only that I am in 
prison. 

If there is anyone out there who would like to be an honest 
friend to someone who is a long way from home, then please 
feel free to write. If you have any questions, please feel free to 
ask them. All letters will be answered as they are received. 

Randy Fritz No. 45537 
Box R 

Buena Vista, Colorado 
81211 



Current Sauce 

would like your suggestions, comments, etc. 
357-S4S6/225A Kyser Hall 



Current 
Sauce 
Staff 



John Ramsey 

Editor 

Lisa Williams 

Managing Editor 

Stacy Scroggins 

Business Manager 

Lucy LeBlanc 
Leah Sherman 
Darlene Winslow 

Advertising 

Russel Bienvenu 

Circulation 

Robin Gunter 

News 

John Cunningham 

Sports Editor 

Bryan Williams 

Layout 

Lejoyce Gaulden 
Susie Nevels 
David Silver 

Staff Writers 

Warren Tape 
Kevin Hopkins 

Photographers 

Peter Minder 

Adviser 

The Current Sauce 
newsmagazine is published 
weekly by students of 
Northwestern State 
University of Louisiana. It is 
student-run and financed, 
and is not associated with 
any of the University's 
colleges or departments. 

Editorial and business 
offices are located at Kyser 
Hall 225A. Office hours are 
1-4:30 pm Tuesday through 
Friday. The telephone 
number is (318) 357-5456. 

All correspondence is 
welcome, and should be 
brought by the office or 
mailed to P.O. Box 5306, 
University Station, Nat- 
chitoches, LA 71497. 

Deadline for both ad- 
vertising and copy is 1 p.m. 
on the Thursday preceding 
Tuesday publication. All 
contributed items must be 
signed and must include a 
telephone number. Names 
will be withheld upon 
request. 

The mail subscription rates 
is $6.00 per semester. 
Current Sauce is entered as 
second class mail in Nat- 
chitoches, LA. USPS number 
140-660. 



The GSC-leading Lady 
Demons have two games 
on tap this week in the 
friendly confines .of Prather 
Coliseum. On Thursday the 
ladies face Alcorn State, 
one of only two teams to 
beat NSU this season. A 
Gulf Star contest 
with Stephen F. Austin follows on Saturday, 
games begin at 7:30, and admittance is by ID. 




Both 



Demon Connection, the annual high school 
visitation day, will be held on campus next 
Wednesday. Visiting students from high schools 
in a tri-state area will be treated to many activities 
in most campus areas. For more information, dial 
357-5240. 



A "Winter Wonderland" party is scheduled 
for Tuesday night at the Student Body nightclub. 
The event is sponsored as a fundraiser for Sigma 
Kappa sorority. 



Three art exhibitions continue 
at the New Orleans Museum 
of Art, housed at City Park 
in the crescent city. They are "New Orleans 
Collects Paperweights", "Painting in the Old 
South", and "The Precious Legacy: Judaic 
Treasures." All run through Sunday. Admission is 
charged. 



Panhellenic open rush for women interested in 
joining a sorority this spring will be held beginning 
this week. Sigma Kappa will host parties on 
Tuesday at 7 p.m. and on Thursday at 8 p.m. Phi 
Mu parties are set for Tuesday at 8 p.m. and an 
open house next Tuesday. Alpha Kappa Alpha 
spring rush will be held on Thursday at 7 p.m. in 
Union 321 . Delta Zeta's spring party will be held 
on Monday at 7 p.m. Delta Zeta, Phi Mu, and 
Sigma Kappa will hold all parties at their respective 
lodges on Greek Hill. 



The Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) will 
be given on Saturday from 8 a.m. -5 p.m. in Kyser 
303, 305, 307, and 309. For more information, 
call the College of Graduate Studies and Research 
at 357-5851. 



The Career Planning and Placement Office will 
feature career workshops next Tuesday and 
Wednesday, Feb. 5-6, in Union 321 . The times 
are 1 1 a.m., 1 and 3 p.m. For more information, 
call the Placement office at 357-5621 . 



"Take me out to the ball game" is the theme 
of Friday's fundraiser at the Student Body, which 
is being sponsored by the Demon Bat Girls. As 
usual, doors open at 9 p.m. 



A chili supper will be served Wednesday at 4 
p.m. for $2.00 at the Wesley Foundation, 520 
College Avenue. Chili, crackers, dessert, and tea 
will be on the menu, and takeouts will be available. 



A weight control group will meet for ten 
Wednesdays during the spring semester, 
beginning this week. The group will be led by Dr. 
Millard Bienvenu, director of the University 
Counseling Center. For information, call the 
Center at 357-5901. 



SGA meets on Monday at 6 p.m. in the con- 
ference room on the second floor of the Union. 



Noteworthy 

Let us know what your 
group or organization is 
planning! Call the Sauce 
hotline 24 hours a day at 




357-5456 



The A. A. Fredericks Center's Orville Hanchey 
Gallery is currently featuring the University of 
New Mexico Print Show through next Friday. 
The gallery is open Monday through Friday from 8 
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Admission is free. 



The motion picture An American Werewolf in 
London, starring David Naughton (of Makin' It 
fame) and featuring excellent special effects, will 
be shown in the Kyser Hall Auditorium on Thur- 
sday and Friday nights at 7 p.m. The movie is free 
to students with ID, and is sponsored by the SAB. 



Flutist Timothy Malosh will be presented in 
concert on Wednesday at 8:30 p.m. in the Recital 
Hall of the A. A. Fredericks Center. He will be 
presented as part of the Artist Series. Students 
will be admitted with ID. 




Singer James Hersch will appear in Union 
Station on Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. The concert 
is presented by the Student Activities Board. 



Northwestern's 49th annual High School 
Speech Tournament will be held on Friday in the 
A. A. Fredericks Center. Several hundred high 
school students from around Louisiana are ex- 
pected to attend. For more information, call 357- 
6196. 



Camelot director Ray Schexnider will hold 
auditions on Monday for the role of Guenevere. 
This actress will play opposite a professional actor 
from New York, who will portray King Arthur. For 
more information, call 357-61 96. 



There will be an organizational meeting of the 
DPMA (NSU computer club) next Wednesday at 
6:15 p.m. in the Business Administration Bldg. 
Following this meeting, Apple Inc. will demon- 
strate the Macintosh personal computer at 7 p.m. 
in Union 320. Also, at 1 p.m. on the same day, 
Apple will have a Macintosh demonstration in the 
Computer Center. All interested parties are in- 
vited to attend. 




The Demon basketball squad is on the road for 
two games this week. On Wednesday, NSU 
faces Southern University at the Clark Activity 
Center on SU's north Baton Rouge campus at 
7:30. The Demons then travel to San Marcos, 
TX, for a Gulf Star contest with Southwest Texas 
on Saturday. 



Innsbruck, Austria is the site of the University 
of New Orleans' 1 0th annual international summer 
school this year. Former senator and presidential 
candidate George McGovern will join the UNO- 
Innsbruck faculty this summer. For information, 
dial (504) 286-7116. 



The Shreveport Symphony on Thursday wioll 
present the second of three "Discovery" con- 
certs. Music by Verese, Mozart, Phillip Glass, 
Francaix, and Beethoven is included. Admission 
is charged. Call 869-2559 for more information. 



There is plenty of In- 
tramural action on campus 
this week, beginning with 
Womens' Bowling at 4 p.m. 
Tuesday in the Union 
games area. On Thursday 
a basketball team captains 
meeting is set for 5 p.m. in 
the Intramural Building. The 
basketball jamboree begins Friday at 4 p.m. in 
either the IM or P.E. Majors Building. The season 
begins at 7 p.m. Monday, in either building, and 
continues Tuesday. IM Monopoly will be held 
from 4-6 p.m. next Wednesday in the Union 
second floor lobby. 

For more information, call 357-5461 . 



The Society for the Advancement of 
Management (SAM) will meet in Union 240 at 3 
p.m. on Thursday. 



Gilbert and Sullivan's The Mikado opens 8 pro- 
Friday at Shreveport's Performing Arts Center. A 
Sunday matinee is scheduled for 3 p.m. Ad- 
mission is charged, and call 869-1164 for in- 
formation. 

Published articles and reviews by members of 
the University faculty are currently on display at 
the media and serials division of the Watson 
Library. 




Movies at the Parkway 
Cinema on Keyser Avenue 
this week are Micki and 
Maude, Runaway, Falling in Love, and Tomboy. 
Call the theatre at 352-51 09 for show times. 




The dedication of the Biological Sciences 
Building as Rene J. Bienvenu Hall is set for next 
Friday at the building. The program begins at 2 
p.m., and nearly 1,000 local and state officials 
have been invited to attend the ceremonies. 
Students are welcome to attend. 



The Louisiana Music Educators Association 
District II High School Honor Choir concerts wfl 
be held on Saturday in the Fine Arts Auditorium o' 
the A. A. Fredericks Center. Admission is free, 
and times of performances can be obtained bi 
calling 357-4522. 



Northwestern State University 

of Louisiana 

Natchitoches, LA 

Feb. 5,1985 
Vol.73, No. 15 




Feb. 5, 1 985 CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73, No. 1 5 



News 



Hundreds expected for 
Demon Connection 



Demon Connection, the 
University's annual visitation 
day for high school juniors and 
seniors from throughout the 
state, will be conducted 
Wednesday on campus. 

Scheduled from 8:45 a.m. 
to 2 p.m., the program 
features campus tours, 
meetings with faculty, in- 
formation on academic 
programs, and sessions on 
•inancial aid. choosing a major, 



opportunity to attend a 
general information session, 
one special interest session, 
and one program on an 
academic major," said Her- 
nandez, who expects a 
number of high school 
students to participate in 
Demon Connection activities. 

Visiting students will eat 
lunch in the Union Junction 
cafeteria from 12-1 p.m. Also 
at that time, campus tours will 



BULLETIN: 

As Current Sauce went to press Tuesday morning, the date 
of Demon Connection was moved to Feb. 1 4, next Thursday. 



career outlooks, and campus 
organizations. 

Tony Hernandez, program 
coordinator, said registration 
will be held beginning at 8:45 
a.m. in the Fine Arts 
Auditorium of the A. A. 
Fredericks Center The 
program will begin at 9:15, 
with the welcome con- 
vocation. At 10 a.m., 
students will then depart for 
departmental programs. 

"Students will have the 



depart from the University 
Bookstore 

During any free time, 
students may sit in on a variety 
of selected college classes. 

At 1 p.m., the Entertainers 
will perform in concert, back in 
the A. A. Fredericks Center. 
After closing comments, the 
program officially ends at 2 
p.m. 

Additional information on 
Demon Connection is available 
by calling 357-5240 




GOT A BEEF? 
Call the Sauce at 357-5456 




introduces The SUPER BURGER 



5Y2 Burger Pattie, 
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Large Order Of Fries 
Freshtastiks Salad Bar 
Hot Bar, Soup, Dessert 

Show Your Student I.D. 
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The Unknown Fan 

Under this mask, or bag, lies freshman Edd Lee, a devoted 
basketball fan. During. Demon and Lady Demon contests, 
Lee frequently dons his bag to disagree with the referee. So 
what's new? 

Potpourri 
Editorship 
Available 

Candidates aspiring to 
obtain the office of Editor-in- 
Chief of the Potpourri should 
file a "notice of intention" by 
noon, Feb. 15, 1985. 
Notices should be picked up 
and returned to Jerry Pierce, 
Chairman of the Student 
Media Board, at Prather 
Coliseum 1 03A. 

Specific responsibilities of 
the Editor-in-Chief are 
described in Article X of the 
SGA Constitution, which can 
be found in the 1984-85 
Student Handbook. 
Qualifications include the 
completion of 45 semester 
hours with a 2.0 overall GPA, 
some hours of magazine 
editing coursework, and 
previous Potpourri ex- 
perience. 

Included in the "notice of 
intention" should be the 
names of proposed key staff 
members. 



$3.59 



Current Sauce 



Feb. 5,1985 
Vol.73, No. 15 



On the Cover 



On Friday, North western 
will honor former Presides 
Rene J. Bienvenu M 
renaming the Biologic! 
Sciences Building for him. 
The late Universil 
president ranks as one 
the great men in N 
century of education, 
remembered well by 
current students and 
members alike. 

On page nine, a brief l 
at the man and the 
ceremonies that will involve 
the renaming of the 
building. 




Last week, Govern) 
Edwards verbally col 
mitted the state to 
chase a share of the I* 
Orleans Saints. Find out* 
page 15 what Editor Jo" 
Ramsey thinks about that 

Lisa Williams looks at N 
four years at Northwest* 
in a page 1 5 editorial 

The Lady Den 
basketball team cri 
Southwest Texas 
Alcorn State last week] 
move to 1 5-3 on the 
See page 13. 



What's going on in 
around Natchitoches 
Northwestern? 
"Noteworthy" on pa9 e 
and find out! 

What do you think ofj 
campus media, 
students give their oi 
as Current Quotes, on P* 
16. 

Did you ever *° 
about how the Unive 
Bookstore operates? 
page 7. 



J 



niiiin;iimnr,u. 



ce 



1985 
0.15 



: ' .11*1 ,tl tlV. :r./UA«> lit:j>)r.'*»> <•£"• it •vO T t 
Vol. 73, No. 15 CURRENT SAUCE Feb. 5, 1985 



PAGE 3 



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NSU's 
, andE 
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Thirty 'Camelot' Roles 
To Be Filled This Week 



Getting a facelift... 

The Old President's Home will be renovated within the next few weeks to house the 
Northwestern Alumni Office. The project should be complete by the summer, when the 
Alumni Office will move to the building from the A.A. Fredericks Center. 

/ 



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Open auditions to fill more 
than 30 adult roles in Camelot. 
the Lerner and Loewe musical 
which is being staged this 
spring will be conducted 
Tuesday and Wednesday. 

The auditions are scheduled 
each day from 3 to 5 p.m. and 
from 7 to 9 p.m. in the Fine 
Arts Auditorium of the A.A. 
Fredericks Center 

Ray Schexnider, associate 
professor of theatre is 
directing the musical, which 
will be presented April 25-27. 
in the A.A. Fredericks Center 

Schexnider said audition 
applicants should come 
prepared with a two-minute 
monologue and song with 
sheet music for the ac- 
companist. 

Major roles in Camelot, the 
last of the famous Lerner and 
Loewe musicals, include King 
Arthur, Merlyn, Guenvere, 
Lancelot, Pellinore, and 
Mordred. 

A special audition session 
was held on Monday, to 
complete the search for an 
experienced actress and 
singer to play the part of 
Guenevere Playing opposite 
the leading lady will be an 
experienced actor and singei 
who is coming to Natchitoches 
from New York to portray King 
Arthur 

Significant supporting roles 
are Sir Dinadan. Sir Lionel, and 



Sir Sagramore. while other 
supporting roles are Nimue. 
Pages. Dap. Clanus. Lady 
Anne. A Lady. Herald. Lady 
Catherine. Sir Ozanna Sir 
Gwilliam. Morgan Le Fey. and 
Tom. 

"We have about 35 roles 
available, all for adults,' said 
Schexnider "These include 
the major and supporting 
speaking roles. chorus 
members, and dancers " 

According to Schexnider. 
who will begin rehearsals in 
early March, the bulk of the 
musical's dialogue is carried 
by King Arthur. Guenevere. 
Lancelot. Pellinore, and 
Mordred. 

Based on T H. White's best- 
selling novel recounting the 
legend with 20th century wit 
and grace, called The Once 
and Future King, the musical 
represents the re-telling of the 
oft-told tale of the medieval 
King Arthur and his Knightjs of 
the Round Table and the 
Queen Guenvere who 
changed the table's shape to a 
triangle. 

The musical comedy version 
that Lerner made from the 
novel made a highly suc- 
cessful run of 25 months on 
Broadway and a remarkably 
trimphant tour of the principal 
cities of America 



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PAGE 4 



Feb. 5, 1 985 CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73. No. 1 5 



Hypnotist, Professor Highlight LA Academy 



Nationally-known lecturers 
James Randi and Dr. Harold J. 
Morowitz, will be the keynote 
speakers for the Louisiana 
Academy of Sciences 59th 
annual meeting this Thursday 
through Saturday. 

Randi, a professional 
magician who has taken to 
uncloaking fraud and delusion 
among practitioners of 
pseudo-science and ESP- 
psychic phenomena, and 
Morowitz, a Yale professor of 
molecular biophysics and 
biochemistry who is an 
authority on creationism, are 
scheduled to address 
academy members and the 
general public Friday in the 
Fine Arts Auditiorium of the 
A. A. Fredericks Center. 

Science and the Chimera," 
based on the relationship of 
science to an illusion or 
fabrication of the mind, will be 
the topic of Randi's 
presentation at 10 a.m. 
Morowitz will discuss "Life 
and the Laws of Physics" 
during his lecture at 1 1 a.m. 

The appearances of Randi 
and Morowitz at the meeting 

Sculpture 

Exhibit 
On Display 

An exhibit of small sculp- 
tures and drawings from Tri- 
State Sculptors is on display 
through Friday in the A. A. 
Fredericks Center. 

The exhibit, which features 
the works of 30 artists from 
North Carolina, South 
Carolina, and Virginia, may be 
viewed Monday through 
Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m. in the Art Department's 
new small gallery, located in 
A. A. Fredericks Center 206. 

Art Department chairman Dr. 
Billy Bryant said works in the 
exhibit range from mechanical 
objects to welded and cast 
metals, carved wood and 
mixed media. "They also 
range from the totally abstract 
to the figurative works," said 
Bryant. 

Each of the drawings in the 
show represents a two- 
dimensional interpretation of 
the sculptures and were 
created by one of the featured 
artists 

This is the first exhibit 
scheduled for the Art 
Department's small gallery. 
"We have renovated our office 
area so that it could double as 
a -small- gallery. •' ^ said » Br y ant ! i 



of the Louisiana Academy of 
Sciences are being sponsored 
by Northwestern's 
Distinguished Lecture Series. 
The programs are open to the 
public without admission 
charge. 

Some of Randi's recent 
antagonists include Tamara 
Rand, who claims to have 
predicted the shooting of 
President Reagan; and Uri 
Geller, who claims to bend 
keys and fix watches with his 
brain waves. 

The professional magician, 
who is a founder and fellow of 



the Committee for the 
Scientific Investigation of 
Claims of the Paranormal, 
contends that "never has a 
properly conducted scientific 
experiment proved 
paranormal powers of any kind 
exist." 

Since 1965, Randi has 
offered a $1 0,000 reward "to 
any person or group that can 
perform one paranormal feat 
of any kind under the proper 
observing conditions." He 
says the prize money "was 
never safer," because none of 
over 600 applicants for the 



prize money have succeeded. 

Randi is the author of 
several books including "Film- 
Flam! The Truth about 
Unicorns, Parapsychology 
and Other Delusions" and 
"The Magic of Uri Geller." He 
was a Regent's Lecturer at 
UCLA, and has performed at 
the White House. He has been 
featured in People and is on 
the editorial board of the 
Skeptical Inquirer. 

Morowitz, whose topic for 
the academy meeting is 
related to the laws on 
creationism, was one of the 



expert witnesses used in| 
creationism trial in Arkanj 
and is being considered as 
witness should the mall 
come to trial in Louisiana 

The Yale professor ft 
spent much effort in ca 
municating an understand 
of science to the gene 
public. This is exemplified 
some of his numerous boo 
including "Life and fl 
Physical Sciences," "Life 
the Planet Earth" and 1 
Wine of Life and Other Essaj 
on Societies, Energy ai 
Living Things." 



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Vol. 73, No. 1 5 CURRENT SAUCE Feb. 5, 1 985 



PAGE 5 



3d in 
Arkans 
ired as 
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ana. 
isor 

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rstandi 

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iplified 
us boo 
and 

"Life 
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er Ess? 
srgy 



"/ feel really good about a lot of things. . . " 

Sam Smith: Everything's right where it should be 



The spring semester is but 
three weeks old, and has 
already faced some very 
unpleasant weather. But Sam 
Smith, director of student 
services, is very happy with 
the way things are going. 

"I feel really good about a lot 
of things, especially the 
heating situation," said Smith. 
The crew at the physical plant 
has been doing a great job. 
We're not without problems, 
of course, but by and large 
we're doing fine." He added 
"so far this year we haven't 
had any entire bjildings 
without heat." 



"Everything seems to be 
right where it should be; it's 
been the smoothest opening 
that we've had in my three 
years here," said Smith. 

Smith added that Nor- 
thwestern students living on 
campus seem to be more 
serious about academes. 
"Our students are more 
serious than last year This 
has been coming along for two 
or three years now," he 
commented. 

Smith and his staff have 
been keeping busy with the 
routine maintenance of the 
residence halls. "We've been 



painting several rooms in 
Rapides and will soon repaint 
Iberville (dining hall)." he said. 
"It won't be that same blue 
color, but instead it will be 
painted purple." 

One of Smith's goals is to 
make residential life more 
appealing to students, not just 
for a dorm to be a place to 
sleep. In keeping with this 
idea. Iberville Dining Hall will 
host it's first special next 
Wednesday, when the 
cafeteria will celebrate Mardi 
Gras. Food, decorations, and 
party favors will highlight the 
day. 




On-campus enrollment is 
"about the same as last 
spring." said Smith. "The 
dorm count always drops from 
fall to spring, but it is usually 
proportionate to the 



"Our students are more 
serious than they last year. 
This has been coming along 
for two or three years now." 

"...it's been the 
smoothest opening that 
we've had in my three years 
here." 

-Sam Smith 

University's enrollment 
decrease during spring 
semesters." 

He said that the number of 
meal ticket purchases were 
about the same as last spring. 
He added that Professional 
Food Management's assistant 
regional manager. Harry 
McDougald, has taken over 



PFM at Northwestern. 

"Harry has over 25 years 
experience in the food ser- 
vice, and has worked at 
schools like Wake Forest and 
North Carolina State," said 
Smith. "He's very versatile: 
he cooks and mops but he's 
also a coat-and-tie man," he 
added. 

Smith also commented that 
"the SGA loan fund is in good 
financial shape, and the in- 
firmary says everyone's 
healthy. I look forward to this 
being a good semester. I'm 
really positive about it." 

Residence hall figures 
released from the Housing 
Office list 1,037 students 
living on campus. A break- 
down by dorm wing follows. 

East Rapides, 135; East 
Sabine, 47; EastVarnado, 95; 
Louisiana, 97; North Nat- 
chitoches, 82; North Sabine, 
70; South Natchitoches, 95; 
South Rapides, 152; South 
Sabine, 48; Warrington Place, 
83; West Rapides, (closed 
this semester); West Sabine, 
47; and West Varnado, 86. 



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PAGE 6 



Feb. 5. 1985 CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73, No. 15 



Says NSU Dean: I 

Louisiana lacking in scientific talent 



There is an immediate need 
in Louisiana to produce a pool 
of scientific talent which will 
generate maximum utilization 
of the state's natural 
resources, says Dr Edward 
Graham, dean of the College 
of Arts and Sciences and 
president of the Louisiana 
Academy of Sciences. 

"If you look at this state as a 
whole," said Graham, "we are 
the richest state in the nation 
in terms of natural resources 
per capita, but we have never 
had the scientific pool to make 
full use of it for our residents." 

He added "When Standard 
Oil comes in and takes the oil, 
we are the supplier of the raw 
materials, but they put their 
research lab in the Northeast, 
up in New Jersey, because 
that's where the pool of 
scientific talent is." 

"We have never really, as a 
state, developed our own 
basis for a science industry," 
said Graham, who taught 
chemistry for eight years at 
UCLA before moving to 
Northwestern. "I think we are 
beginning to hurt for that 
reason. I think we need to 
encourage the development of 
good universities, because 
other states that have a good, 
strong science base have 
that ."" 

Because his educational and 
research backgrounds are in 
chemistry, Graham - a former 
visiting professor and scientist 
at the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, the Oak Ridge 



National Laboratory and the 
University of California at 
Berkeley - is becoming more 
concerned that Louisiana 
universities are not producing 
the number of graduates in 
chemistry that the state needs 



"We have never really 
developed our own basis for 
a science industry. I think 
for that reason we are 
beginning to hurt." 

-Dean Edward Graham 



to develop a strong science 
base to benefit its people. 

Graham cited two univer- 
sities with enrollments of 
about 30,000 each - LSU- 
Baton Rouge and UCLA. He 
said LSU graduated 1 5 



students with bachelors 
degrees and nine with doc- 
torates in chemistry during the 
last academic year, while 
UCLA graduated 1 50 
students in chemistry. 

"The difference there is 
striking," said Graham, who 
received his doctorate from 
California-Berkeley. "You can 
sum up all of the chemistry 
graduates at all the state 
universities, and they don't 
equal that of some small liberal 
arts schools in the Northeast." 

As president of the 
Louisiana Academy of 
Sciences, which will hold its 
59th annual meeting Thursday 
through Saturday on campus, 
Graham and the state's other 
scientists from universities 
and industry have been trying 
to improve the situation in 
Louisiana. 




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Vol.73, No. 15 CURRENT SAUCE Feb. 5, 1985 



PAGE 7 



Lack of Textbooks Upsets Students, Staff 



I 



|fy Ricky Moore 

"Ordered - Not In" adorned 
36 empty bookshelf spaces in 
the bookstore a week after 
classes had started. They 
ranged from English 99 and 
100 to Home Economics 
408. 

There are hundreds of 
students unhappy with this 
situation. Michelle Gilbreth, 
junior, said, "Out of the six 
books that I needed this 
semester, three were not in 
the bookstore at the beginning 
of the semester. 

Gary Crawford, a senior 
said, "All my books came in on 
time this semester, but during 
the past five years I've had to 
wait two to three weeks, 
several times, for my books to 
come in." 

There are also several 
professors unhappy because 
they do not have books to 
teach with. Mike Moore, an 
instructor in the department of 
accounting and computer 
information systems, has 
taught at the University of 
Houston and the Florida In- 
stitute of Technology. He said, 
§ have never taught a course 
at any other university where 
the book was not in the 
bookstore at the beginning of 
class." He said that was not 
the case here. 



The manager of the 
bookstore, Darlene Rachal, 
said that this was a normal 
semester as far as the number 
of books that were "Ordered - 
Not In." 

When asked why some of 
the books did not arrive on 
time she said, "It's the 'what 
ifs' that get you." She then 



Baumgardner has told her that 
summer terms S/T Request 
will be ready in three or four 
weeks (late February). 

She said after she reviews 
the S/T Request, it will be sent 
to the "Faculty Heads" for 
verification. Then she should 
receive it back around March 
1 1 and have the orders ready 




explained the book ordering 
process, using the upcoming 
summer term as an example. 

She said the process starts 
with Dr. Baumgardner, the 
Registrar. He has to finalize 
the Schedule/Textbook 
Request before she can order 
any books because she uses 
that to tell her which books to 
order because she 

uses that to tell her which 
books to order. Dr. 



by March 15. 

Then she will send the 
finalized verified S/T Request, 
which list the books to be 
ordered, to Dr. Fred Bosarge, 
Dean of Students. From there 
it will go to the Controllers 
Office for verification of funds. 
Finally it will go to the pur- 
chasing agent, Sylvan Sibley, 
who will put the order in the 
mail. This she said should 
occur sometime between 



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March 1 5 and April 1 . 

It requires eight weeks from 
the time the publisher receives 
the order until the books 
arrive. So, she said, the latest 
the order could leave Sibley's 
office, and the books still get 
here on time, would be around 
the first of April. 

She said, "so you can see 
how the what ifs' kill you and 
she listed some: What if Dr. 
Baumgardner is late with the 
finanlized S/T Request; What if 
the "Faculty Heads" are slow 
with their veiification; What if 
after it leaves her office, it is 
slowed down on its way to 
Sibley's office; And what if the 
publisher fouls up and sends 
the wrong book, or not 
enough books, or the books 
are destroyed in shipping. She 
said the 'what ifs' go on and 
on. 

"The thing that would help 
me the most to get the books 
in on time," she said, "would 
be to receive the S/T Request 



overpriced and they are 
overpriced because the 
bookstores are willing to pay 
the price and pass it on to the 
student. They should 
negotiate with the publisher on 
the prices." 

When asked what the 
markup on the textbooks was. 
Rachal said she would rather 
not say. She said the person 
who could answer that 
question would be her boss. 
Sam Smith, director of student 
services. 

When Smith was asked what 
the markup was, he said that 
he did not know. But he did 
say that "It's (the bookstore) 
like a business, so there has to 
be some profit." He also said, 
"Our problems (at the 
bookstore) are not unique in 
comparison to other colleges 
and universities." 

Later Rachal was told what 
Smith said about the markup. 
Again she refused to say what 
it was. She said it was not 




for the upcoming semester 
earlier than I have been." 

Another complaint that some 
students have with the 
bookstore is the prices. Vicki 
Branham, a transfer student 
thought the prices at the 
bookstore were too high. 
' At the University of New 
Orleans there were several 
bookstores off campus where 
we could buy books. I think 
that if this bookstore had some 
competition the prices would 
be lower." 

Professor Moore also had 
some comments on the prices 
of textbooks. "Textbooks are 



public information because the 
bookstore was not only a 
service organization, but a 
business as well, that had to 
make a profit. 

Dr. Bearden, from the 
education department, who 
has been teaching on this 
campus for 1 9 years, had this 
to say.^'The present managei 
is coopertive in trying to 
secure books and issue 
them." However, "Something 
seems to be wrong with the 
system and it's a shame that 
the students are (the ones) 
penalized...." 



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Vol. 73, No. 15 CURRENT SAUCE Feb. 5, 1985 




Cover Story 9 



Bienvenu Hall dedication 
Set for 2 p.m. on Friday 



Dr. Rene J. Bienvenu 



Ceremonies are scheduled 
for Friday, to officially 
dedicate the Biological 
Sciences, Building as the 
Rene J. Bienvenu Hall for 
Biological Sciences. 

The dedication program will 
begin at 2 p.m. in the 
auditorium of the building, 
which opened in the fall of 
1 970 while Bienvenu was 
serving as dean of the College 
of Science and Technology. 
Nearly 1 ,000 elected local 
I and state officials, former 
students and colleagues of 
Bienvenu and other individuals 
are being extended invitations 
to join the general public for 
the ceremonies. 

One of the speakers, who 
has been asked to give his 
personal and professional 
comments, is former NSU 
president Dr. John Barkate, 
who now serves as associate 



director of the U.S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture's Southern 
Regional Research Center in 
New Orleans. He previously 
was director of microbiology 
research and assistant 
director of central research for 
Ralston-Purina in St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Immediately following the 
dedication program at 3 p.m. 
will be the Bienvenu Hall 
Dedicatory Symposium, 
featuring scientific research 
presentations by 
microbiologists who have 
known or have been 
acquainted with Bienvenu, a 
nationally-known scientific 
researcher and writer himself 
before becoming president of 
Northwestern in 1 978. 

The symposium is 
scheduled under the 
microbilogy section of the 
59th annual meeting of the 



Louisiana Academy of 
Sciences, which will be 
conducted on campus, 
Thursday through Saturday. 

Of the Louisiana Board of 
Trustees decision to name the 
Biological Sciences Building in 
honor of Bienvenu, who died 
in 1 983, president Dr. Joseph 
J. Orze said, "It is an honor 
justly earned by Rene and but 
a small token of the esteem in 
which he was held by his 
collegues at the University." 

Bienvenu was a faculty 
member and administrator at 
Northwestern for 27 years 
before becoming the in- 
stitution's 1 4th president. One 
month before his death, he 
was named president emeritus 
of NSU in recognition of his 32 
years of service to the school 
and his five years as chief 
administrator. 



NSU a part of Bienvenu's life for over 30 years 



Dr. Rene J. Bienvenu Jr., dedicated more 
than 30 years of his life to the University as a 
teacher, department chairman, dean and 
president, and his positive influence is still 
felt at the institution which he loved so 
deeply. 

President from 1 978 until his retirement in 
1982, Bienvenu joined the science faculty 
in 1950 and served Northwestern con- 
tinually for over three decades except for a 
brief period in 1 977 when he was assistant 
dean of the School of Allied Health at the 
LSU Medical Center in Shreveport. 

Before becoming chief administrator at the 
University, Bienvenu had served as 
chairman of the Department of Microbiology 
for seven years and as dean of the College 
of Science an Technology for 1 years. 

A native of Colfax, Bienvenu received 
bachelor and master's degree's from LSU, 
and he earned the doctorate in microbiology 
from the University of Texas. He also 
studied at the University of Pennsylvania, 
Cornell and the Oak Ridge Institute for 
Nuclear Studies and was a visiting professor 
at Texas. 

Bienvenu served as a microbiologist at 
Confederate Memorial Hospital in 
Shreveport and as a chemist for Leland 
Hamner Company in Houston before joined 
the Northwestern faculty. 

Named after his retirement as President 
Emeritus of Northwestern, Dr. Bienvenu 
guided the University through a period of 
significant achievement. He worked to 
obtain funding for a new nursing school 
facility and for the most outstanding 
e ducational fine arts complex in Louisiana, 
the A. A. Fredericks Center. 

The Microbiology Department which he 



developed and nurtured was cited for ex- 
cellence by the Board of Regents, un- 
derscoring a brilliant career as a scientist 
which included meaningful research and 
extensive publications. 

Of his numerous accomplishments and 
capabilities, Bienvenu was perhaps 
proudest of his rapport with students. Young 
people admired and respected him as a 
teacher, administrator and scientist, and he 
had a beneficial impact on hundreds who 
became successful researchers, teachers 
and writers. 

It is appropriate that Bienvenu's memory 
and outstanding service are perpetuated 
through a life sciences scholarship fund that 
will continue to provide assistance to 
deserving students and now through the 
dedication of an outstanding science and 
educational facility that will bear the name of 
a giant in Northwestern's 1 00-year history. 




Dr. Bienvenu 



At left is the Biological 
Sciences Building, which 
will be renamed Bienvenu 
Hall on Friday. 



Feb. 5, 1 985 CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73, No. 1 5 



10 



Close-Up 



USA ON- 
CAMPUS 



Nebraska paper faces roommate controversy 




When does preference become prejudice? 
That was the question facing the University of 
Nebraska at Lincoln student newspaper and 
Publications Board last month. The answer 
may ultimately come in a court of law. 

The controversy began when the Daily 
Nebraskan refused to run an ad, submitted by 
two women, seeking a lesbian roommate. The 
two women complained to the paper's 
Publication Board. 

Lincoln's housing code allows roommate ads, 
by people with four or fewer roommates, to 
include preferences of any kind. 

The Publication Board rewrote the 
newspaper's ad policy to the complaint. It now 
expressly prohibits ads from discriminating on 
the basis of "sex and sexual orientation." The 
board, however, also decided to allow ad- 
vertisers seeking roommates to specify a 
gender preference. So people placing ads can 
request a male or female roommate, but not 
specify sexual preference. 

Chris Welsch, Daily Nebraskan editor, 
believes the two changes contradict each other 
and are "probably in violation of the First 
Amendment." The board is, says Welsch, 
allowing ads to discriminate on the basis on 
gender, but not on the basis of sexual 
preference. "I thought that was really funny," 
he says. "I was hoping the issue would come 
to litigation so it would be settles because the 
board just stepped around it." 



He may get his wish. The two women who 
filed the original complaint have told Welsch 
that they will ask the Nebraska Civil Liberties 
Union's help in pursuing the issue in court. 
Both the NCLU and Mark Abrams, of the 
Student Press Law Center in Washington DC, 
have indicated the present policy may be 
illegal. 

Because the purpose of running a roommate 
ad is to find compatible living partners, 
"roommate ads are a farce without expression 
of preferences," says Welsch. He favors a 
compromise: Allow those placing roommate 
ads to include a self -description. Welsch says 
the gay community and the UNL women's 
department would back such a policy. The pub 
board rejected it, however, believing that 
describing one's self as homosexual is the 
same as asking for a gay roommate and 
therefore discriminatory against heterosexuals. 

The furor over the ad policy has raised 
another, larger controversy: legal control of 
the Daily Nebraskan. Welsch believes the 
present policy statement of the newspaper 
gives the editor sole control of, and respon- 
sibility for, the contents of the newspaper. The 
board is a governmental entity by virtue of its 
beging an arm of the UNL administration, he 
says, and, therefore prohibited by the First 
Amendment from controlling the paper. 

Welsch agreed to abide by the board's 
decisions until the issue is resolved. 



Passing the Buck 



The Associated Students at Western Oregon 
State College is handing out big bucks in an 
effort to pass the buck. 

The AS "bucks'" are green 5x9 cards, 
printed with a border similar to that of a dollar 
bill, which allows students to route 
suggestions, complaints, and requests for 
imformation throught the AS, to specific offices 
on campus. Students need only fill in the face 
of the card with the date and their concern, 
check one of the 55 boxes on the back the 
card to indicate where they would like the 
"buck'" passed, and drop it in one of seven 
locked suggestion boxes. Optional spaces are 
provided for their names and telephone 
numbers. 

Now in its third year, the "One Buck Passed'" 
program has "been really effective for us." 



says Dave Proehl. Student Senate chairman. 
"Although, when we reprint the forms next 
time, we're going to try and give the program a 
more positive name. " 



Improved relations between students and the 
administration at WOSC have reduced the need 
for the program somewhat, Proehl says. 
Students feel welcome to visit the president's 
office and voice their concerns in person, so 
the need for "passing the buck" is diminished. 

The program was the brainchild of WOSC 
Coordinator of Student Activities Romona 
Carnes. when she was a WOSC student and 
member of the Student Senate. Construction 
of the boxes put the initial cost of the program 
at about $180. but annual reprinting of the 
forms is only running about $75. 




Lady Demons In 




Action 


This Week 


Friday - Delta State 




Saturday ■ Nicholls State 




Monday - Southeastern LA 


All games begin at 7:30 



THE GEORGIA COLLEGE 
NEWSPAPER tried to enter a 
beef roast in the Miss Georgia 
College pageant, a first-round 
contest for Miss America. The 
' entry," named Piece of Meat, 
was the newspaper's protest 
of the college's participation in 
a contest based on beauty, 
marital status, and sexual 
behavior. 

THE U. OF IOWA STUDENT 
SENATE is encouraging 
campus programmers not to 
book entertainers who have 
performed in South Africa. 
The senate passed a 
resolution endorsing a 1 983 
United Nations boycott of 
performers, such as Barry 
Manilow, Kenny Rogers, and 
the Beach Boys, who have 
played for segregated 
audiences in South Africa. 
The final decision on campus 
concerts is up to two separate 
programming boards. 

A NOOSE LEFT HANGING in 

the Black Student Union at the 
U. of Southern California was 
intended "as a form of political 
education to motivate the BSU 
to positive action" according 
to an anonymous telephone 
caller. The noose was ac- 
companied by a note that 
read: "Ronald Reagan and 
KKK - Wake up, Nigger's, or 
you are all thru." BSU 
members said they were 
angry at the tactics used to 
convey a "positive" rtiessage. 

YALE STUDENTS WANT 
MORE SEX, according to a 
non-scientific survey there. 
Seventy-four percent would 
like more sex in their lives, 
although 81 percent already 
consider themselves 
"somewhat" to "very" 
sexually active. At Duke U., 
meanwhile, a study found 
students think there's more 
sexual activity on campus than 
there actually is. While a 
majority of students thought 
that 60-80 percent of Duke 
males had engaged in in- 
tercourse, only 31 percent of 
the men surveyed said they'd 
actually had intercourse. The 
survey results will be used to 
develop counseling and in- 
formation programs. 

CONTROVERSY HAS 
ERUPTED at Moorhead State 
U. (Minnesota). After one 
group persuaded ad- 
ministrators to remove 
Penthouse from the MSU 
bookstore, another group 
formed to bring it back, saying 
people have the right to 
choose their own reading 
material. A petition supporting 
the sale of Penthouse gained 
400 signatures. 



Vol. 73, No. 1 5 CURRENT SAUCE Feb. 5, 1 985 



PAGE 11 




Better safe than sorry 

Varnado Hall resident Susan Fortenberry uses one of the safety combination locks on 
the back side of the dorm. Only residents are allowed access to the combination. 

Summer Camp Applications Due 



Applications are now Deing 
accepted for staff workers to 

assist at tne NSU/National 
Cheerleader Association 

summer camp, to be held in 
June. 

Two positions are available - 



RA (resident assistant) and 
student worker. RA's live in 
Sabine Hall for the three 
weeks of the camp, and are 
paid for 60 hours em- 
ployment. Student workers 
assist during the day around 
their class schedule, and are 
paid for 50 hours. 



Deadline for applying for the 
positions is March 1 . The staff 
will select students for the 
jobs after Spring Break. 

For more information, call 
357-5240 or stop by the 
Office of Enrollment 
Management, on the second 
floor of Caspari Hall. 



This Week 
at the 
Student Body 




...by popular demand - ■ -FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 
NIGHT Admission $3 Doors open at 10. 



Professor awarded grant 
To study 'Cajun English 9 



Linguistics professor Dr. 
J.L Dillard has been awarded 
a University Research Grant to 
investigate the French in- 
fluence on South Louisiana 
English. 

"Although Cajun English is 
informally well known and 
figures in many popular 
works," said Dr. Dillard, who is 
internationally-acclaimed in the 
field of linguistics, "it has been 
almost completely ignored in 
the professional literature of 
dialectology and of 
linguistics." 

Dillard, whose books include 
the 1972 release of Black 
English, Its History and Usage 
in the United States, and the 
forthcoming Toward a Social 
History of American English, 
says the results of the in- 
vestigation will be published in 
American Speech, a 
nationally-recognized scholar- 
ly periodical. 

Assisting Dillard in the brief 
field study will be his associate 
investigator, Shirley Ann 
LeDuff, English graduate 
student. 

"The research method," 
explains Dillard, "will be the 
simple one of eliciting fixed 



WANTED: Textbooks for 
Journalism 306, Effective 
Public Relations, 5th 
Edition, by Cutlip & Center. 
Students now enrolled want 
to beg, borrow or buy 
copies. Class meets TT, 1 1 
a.m., Kyser 207. Please 
bring books to that class or 
contact Mr. Presson, Kyser 
Hall 225E, Phone 5339, as 
soon rs possible. 



phrases which reflect ihe 
influence of Louisiana Fronr.h 
on the English of at least one 
segment of the population of 
Southern Louisiana " 

The investigation which 
Dillard and his associate 
conducting this sprint; 'in- 
cludes hours of iecordiiVj3 
with several people from the 
Baton Rouge area who are 
known to be proficient in their 
use of Cajun English 

"In spite of the fact that 
Cajun-Acadian to the over- 
dignitied-English is an open 
secret to Louisianians. there is 
a surprising dearth of serious 
work on that language 
variety." states Dillard 

According to the professor, 
previous dialect research has 
been directed toward the 
tracing of populations in the 
United States to their origin in 
England. When investigations 
did include people of non- 
British origin, the studies were 
based on the English of Black 
Americans 

"It is well known that other 
groups, like the Pennsylvania 
Germans and the Chicanos of 
the Southwest, speak radically 
nonstandard English dialects," 
said Dillard, "but almost no 
serious work has been done 
on them." 

He added, "The same can 
be said for the English of the 
bilingual population of 
southern Louisiana, even in 
some cases where the 
retention of French is 
vestigial." 



NORTHWESTERN SWEATERS 

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Feb. 5, 1 985 CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73. No. 1 5 



12 



Sports 




Takin' It In 

Sylvester Smith drives to the basket for the Demons in last 
week's overtime loss to the Southeastern Lions. With the 
loss, NSU fell to 2-1 8 on the season. 

The Demons have no games this week, and are in the 
middle of a one-and-a-half week 'vacation.' 



Three IM events held, 
Weather cancels one 



The Intramural department 
had a busy schedule last 
week, completing three 
events before weather forced 
cancellation of Friday ac- 
tivities. 

One-on-One basketball was 
the spring's first event. The 
men's division was won by 
Chris Carter of the Celtics. 
TKE's Grady Norton finished 
second, while independents 
Byron Bernard and Jeff Bailey 
tied for third. 

Sigma Kappa's Mikki Stark 
was the women's champion. 
Marilyn Levo of Louisiana 
Ladies filled the runner-up 
spot, and third place was 
again a tie, this time by Phi 
Mu's Donna Box and Vicki 
Cleveland, an independent. 

The Kingpins took top 
honors in the mens bowling 
tournament last week at 
Country Lanes. They 
defeated Budmen and Kappa 
Sigma to win the title. The 
Sigs finished second, while 
Budmen were third. 

Phi Mu's two teams swept 
the first two positions in the 
women's competition. Sigma 
Kappa was third. 

The Phi Mu's also won the 
women's ping pong singles, in 
the form of Doogie McNulty. 
Christi Moore finished for Tri- 
Sigma, while Sigma Kappa's 
Abby White and Phi Mu's 
Donna Box shared third prize. 

Moore teamed with fellow 
Tri-Sig Patti Smiley to win the 
doubles competition. Mikki 
Stark and Rachel Heider took 



second for Sigma K, and Phi 
Mu tied Louisiana Ladies for 
third with Dena "Shongaloo" 
Haynes and Donna Box 
playing for Phi Mu. 

Ching Yee Ming won the 
single's title in men's ping 
pong for Kingpins and Eddie 
McDugle took second for 
Budmen. Jeff Hartline of TKE 
and Ronney Hendricks of 
Kappa Alpha Psi tied for third. 

In double's competition, 
Freddy Silva teamed with Yee 
Meng Chong for Kingpins for 
first place. McDugle and Tony 
Brown helped Budmen to 
another second place finish, 
while Kappa Sig's James 
Smith and Coy "Indiana" 
Gammage finished at third, 
tied with Hartline and Greg 
Geier of Tau Kappa Epsilon. 

In addition to this week's 



events (see "Noteworthy" on 



page 16), the Intramural 
department will co-host a 
Valentine's party with the SAB 
on Feb. 14 from 7-1 1 p.m. in 
Union Station. All students are 
invited. 



Bright Idea 




The Consumer information Center of the 
U.S. General Services Administration puts 
the Catalog together quarterly to make sure 
you gel the most up-to-date information. 

So send tor a copy and shed some light 
on your problems It s free tor the asking 
Just write— 
CONSUMER INFORMATION CENTER 
DEPT. LB 
PUEBLO, COLORADO 81009 

US G*fW>jlS*i.*ces Adminisi»*l*n 




THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO 
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY. 

And they're both repre- 
sented by the insignia you wear 
as a member of the Army Nurse 
Corps. The caduceus on the left 
means you're part of a health care 
system in which educational and 
career advancement are the rule, 
_ not the exception. The gold bar 
on the right means you command respect as an Army officer. If you're 
earning a BSN, write: Army Nurse Opportunities, P.O. Box 7713, 
Clifton, NJ 07015. 

ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE. 





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NO PURCHASE NECESSARY 

Bring in this ad for a free pair of leather-faced work gloves 
($3.00 retail value) when you join our Rental Club (no 
membership fee). Rental Club card entitles you to 10% 
discounts on all rentals at your U-Haul Center. Find us in 
the white pages. 




SPECIAL OFFER TO INTRODUCE YOU TO RENT N' SAVE" EQUIPMENT 

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AP2I 



Vol. 73, No. 1 5 CURRENT SAUCE Feb. 5, 1 985 



PAGE 13 



Lady Demons look good 
In abuse of SWT, Alcorn 




The Lady Demons played 
two impressive games last 
week, as they crushed GSC- 
rival Southwest Texas and 
turned the tables on Alcorn 
State. 

Earlier this season, Alcorn 
scored a 1 01 -99 win over the 
NSU ladies at home in Lorman, 
MS. This time, the Lady 
Demons got revenge... and 
how. 

The final was 95-65, as the 
Northwestern squad showed 
the Lady Bravettes why they 
were ranked in the nation's top 
three in scoring offense. It 
was the second time last week 
the team scored 95 points. 

Earlier, on Monday night, 
the Lady Demons tied a 
Northwestern record by 



scoring 109 points against 
hapless Southwest Texas. 
The Lady 'Cats managed only 
61 points. 

Led by freshman Gussie 
Leonard's 24-point per- 
formance, every player on the 
NSU bench scored against 
Alcorn. 

Northwestern also received 
double-digit scoring from 
Teressa Thomas with 15, 
Linda Grayson with 13, and 
Lonnie Banks and Annie Harris 
with 1 each. 

Monica Lee pitched in eight 
for Northwestern, while Val 
Williams added six and Missy 
Landreneau canned four. 
Ginger Craig and Sandy Pugh 
contributed two points each, 
and Kristy Harris picked up 




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one point. 

Against SWT, five of Coach 
Pat Pierson's high-powered 
Lady Demons scored in 
double figures in the 48-point 
wipeout of the Lady Bobcats. 
Grayson scored 22 points, 
followed by Leonard with 20 
and Banks' 19. Pugh and 
Kristy Harris each pitched in 
1 points each. 

Rounding out NSU scoring 
were Annie Harris and Lee, 8 
each, and Craig, Landreneau, 
and Williams with four each. 

The Lady Demons, 1 5-3 on 
the year, have three home 
games this week to wrap-up 
their scheduled Prather 
Coliseum games for this 
season. 

The Lady . Statesmen of 
Delta State University 
(Mississippi) travel to Nat- 
chitoches on Friday night to 
battle the ladies, and the 
Nicholls State Lady Colonels 
will visit the Coliseum on 
Saturday night. 

Coach Pierson's squad has 
not met the Delta State squad 
yet this year, but is 0-3 in 
overall battles against the 
Mississippians. Northwestern 
blasted Nicholls State in 
Thibodaux earlier this year. 

On Monday, the Lady Lions 
of Gulf Star rival Southeastern 
Louisiana will face the Lady 
Demons, again in the friendly 
confines of Prather. Like 
Nicholls State, SLU has 
already lost once this season 
to the Northwestern ladies. 

The team travels to 
Cleveland, MS, next Wed- 
nesday to face the Lady 
Statesmen in their home 




Grayson goes for two 

Lady Demon Linda Grayson goes for a bucket during last 
week's 40-point NSU win over the Ladykats of Sam Houston 
State. 



arena, the 4,000-seat Sillers 
Coliseum. 

Following the away game at 
Delta State, the Lady Demons 
travel to GSC foes Sam 
Houston, Southwest Texas, 



and Stephen F. Austin. 

Friday's home game with 
Stephen F. Austin, which was 
cancelled because of 
weather, has been 
rescheduled for Feb. 27. 




PAGE 14 



Feb. 5, 1985 CURRENT SAUCE Vol.73. No. 15 



Annie Harris A Key To Lady Demon Success 



by Jay Miller 

Annie Harris, the Lady 
Demons 5-8, 130-pound 
package of dynamite, and the 
teams' noted defensive 
player, got her education on 
the court m two different 
schools 

The sophomore computer 
science major, averaging 10.7 
points per game and just 
under six rebounds in NSU's 
record-tying 1 3-3 start most 
always draws the offensive 
machine in the opponents 
dressing room 

Why? Because Nat- 
chitoches-Central Coach 
Mona Martin helped her with 
the fundamentals of defense 
plus some natural ability 

Mrs Martin got me to do the 
fundamental things-moving 
the feet, blocking out, fronting 
and rebounding All of them 
seemed to come naturally." 
said Harris 

Consolidation procedures 
mo/ed the Clarence native 
from state champion Nat- 
chitoches-Central after he r 
sophomore year to Campti 
High School, where she 
teamed with present team- 
mates Linda Grayson and 
Sandy Pugh to help CHS drive 
.'or two consecutive state 
championships and in all. 
Harris's second and third in a 
row 

More important for Nor- 
thwestern. Harris was instilled 
with the drive to do more than 
she had done her freshman 
and sophomore basketball 
seasons I didn't work at the 



games until (CHS coach) 
Emma Boozman got after me," 
admitted Harris 

Boozman took the erratic 
shooting of Harris and 
changed it to the nice arc, spin 
and touch you can see today 
in Prather Coliseum Harris 
has hit 70 to 142 attempts 
this season including a season 
high 1 9 points against Nicholls 
State while shooting 
anywhere from just inside the 
three poin line "She made me 
concentrate on the follow 
through, just like in most 
sports, it's important," said 
Harris "She also told me to 
keep my elbow in. She 
demanded practice and I 
didn't get off easy We spent 
hard times practicing. She 
deserves a lot of credit. " 

As much credit as present 
coaches Pat Pierson and 
James Smith Coach Smith 
you can say put the finishing 
touches on my shooting," 
commented Hams "He is 
constantly reminding me about 
keeping the elbow in and to 
shoot the ballk with more wrist 
action rather than pushing the 
ball with your arm It's more 
accurate with your wrist." 

Harris is a four-time all- 
district selection and 1 983 
state MVP who has been 
interested in the hardcourt 
game as long as she can 
remember. "I went into 
organized basketball in the 
sixth grade, but before that, 
there were always kids around 
to shoot and play That's all we 
would do sometimes after 




school." Mr. and Mrs. George 
Harris can verify that, she 

says. 

Thirty-five school contacted 
Harris her last two seasons in 
high school, among them LSU, 
Tech, Northwestern, Nor- 
theast, Ole Miss., SMU and 
Long Beach State. 

"What it really came down to 
was the coaches of Nor- 
thwesternj.l" said Harris. 
"Distance didn't play a factor 



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because I gave Ole Miss a 
good look, but Coach Pierson 
and Coach Smith handle the 
players and themselves well 
They are a good example of 



people as well as coaches. " 

Score another two points for 
Annie Harris, she has just 
:;wished home another ac- 
curate shot 



OVERSEAS EMPLOYMENT 

WORLD-SIDE OPPORTUNITIES FOR MEN AND Wf)«TJ 
JAPAN - EUROPE AFRICA - AUSTRALIA - THE -0! i 
PACIFIC -SOUTH AMERICA -THE F\R EAST. 
EXCELLENT BENEFITS. HIGHER SALARIES AND W, H .K 
FREE TRANSPORTATION! GENEROUS VACATIONS! 



More than 300,000 Americans 
— not including members of 
the armed services — are 
now living overseas. These 
people are engaged in nearly 
everypossible activi- 
ty. ..construction, engineer- 
ing, sales, transportation, 
secretarial work, accoun- 
ting, manufacturing, oil 
refining, teaching, nursing, 
government, etc. -etc. And 
many are earning $2,000 to 
$5,000 per month. ..or more! 

To allow you the op- 
portunity to apply for 
overseas employment, we 
have researched and compil- 
ed a new and exciting direc- 
tory on overseas employ- 
ment. Here is just a sample 
of what our International 
Employment Directory 
covers. 

(1) . Our International 
Employment Directory lists 
dozens of cruise ship com- 
panies, both on the east and 
west coast. You will be told 
what type of positions the 
cruise ship companies hire, 
such as deck hands, 
restaurant help, cooks, 
bartenders, just to name a 
lew. You will also receive 
several Employment Ap- 
plication Forms that you 
may send directly to the 
companies you would like to 
work for. 

(2) . Firms and organiza- 
tions employing all types of 
personnel in Australia, 



Japan, Africa, The Soufl 
Pacific, The Far East Sodj 
America. ..nearly every pafl 
of the free world! 

f 3 ) . Companies and 
Government agencies 
employing personnel in near- 
ly every occupation, from 
the unskilled laborer to the 
college trained professional 
man or woman. 

(4) . Firms and organiza- 
tions engaged in foreign con- 
struction projects, manufac- 
turing, mining, oil refining 
engineering, sales, services, 
teaching, etc., etc. 

(5) . How and where to ap- 
ply for overseas Government 
jobs. 

(6) . Information about 
summer jobs. 

(7) . You will receive our 
Employment Opportunity 
Digest. ..jam-packed with in- 
formation about current job 
opportunities. Special sec- 
tions features news of 
overseas construction pro- 
jects, executive positions 
and teaching opportunities. 

90 Day Money 
Back Guarantee 
Our International Employ- 
ment Directory is sent to yoi; 
with this guarantee. If for 
any reason you do not obtain 
overseas employment or you 
are not satisfied with the job 
offers. ..simply return our 
Directory within 90 days ami 
we'll refund your money pro- 
mptly. ..no questions asked. 



ORDER FORM 

International Employment Directory 
131 Elma Dr. Dept.T21 
Centralia. WA 98531 

Please send me a copy of your International Employment 
Directory. I understand that I may use this information for 90 
days and if I am not satisfied with the results, I may return 
your Directory for an immediate refund. On that basis I'm 
enclosing $20.00 cash.... check.... or money order.... for your 
Directory. 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



CITY 



please print 

APT # 
STATE 

International Employment Directory 1984 



ZIP 



Vol. 73, No. 1 5 CURRENT SAUCE Feb. 5. 1 985 



Viewpoint 



15 



Season Tickets 
As Tax Refunds 

It's not football season, but it's okay. Demon 
Dictionary word number fourteen deals with a 
timeless football joke: 

New Orleans Saints - the absolutely worst 
football team in America. The only team in 
National Football League history to go 18 years 
without a playoff berth, or even a winning season. 

Ah yes, the Saints. South Louisiana loves them, 
but the "yankee" part of the state, from Alexandria 
northward, seems to back the boys from Dallas in- 
stead. Can't blame 'em. Dallas wins; New Orleans 
doesn't. 

So fed up with the situation in the 'Dome is owner 
John Mecom that several weeks ago he put the 
Saints up for sale - for just $75 million. He also 
threatened to take the team out of state if that's 
where the best offer was. Someone should have 
paid him to do just that. . . 

Wisely, no one was at first willing to put up that kind 
of money for that kind of team. But last week, the 
plot thickened, as a prominent family from New 
Orleans came through to keep the team in the 
crescent city - with the help of the generous State of 
Louisiana. 



You remember them, don't you? The same State of 
Louisiana that lost millions on the World's Fair. The 
same State of Louisiana that is known for corruption. 
The same (and only) state that gets laughed at by 
both the Wall Street Journal and 60 Minutes in the 
same year. The same. . you get the picture. 

Everyone's friend Edwin Edwards has entered the 
picture, offering up to $20 million dollars in state 
funds to purchase a minority share of the Saints. 
This, he says, will keep the team in the Superdome 
for thirty more years and will insure that New Orleans 
doesn't lose some $1 20 million revenue annually that 
the Saints supposedly bring in to the local economy. 

Not a good move, Gov. 

It reasons that even if the Saints weren't bluffing 
and did move, the NFL would award a new franchise 
to New Orleans. Would the league turn its back on a 
city that already has future Super Bowls lined up. 
Probably not. 

Louisiana's highways are in bad shape. The 
economy is, at best, sluggish. The state's univer- 
sities are underfunded (even LSU is on TV begging 
for contributions). Our state has enough problems 
already. 

Now we've added yet another problem. This one 
promises to be a massive headache for the 
'awmakers in Baton Rouge when Edwards' special 
session rolls around. 

What's next? Will tomorrow's headlines say 
"Edwards, state purchase share of Pat O'Brien's 9 

You know. I wouldn't doubt it. 



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John Ramsey 



Editor 



A Brief Look at 
Why We're Here 

Somewhere along the line it seems we may have forgotten 
why we came here in the first place. As a graduating senior, I 
can sit back and take an honest look at the past four years at 
Northwestern. 

I've gone through the typical stages most college students go 
through, freshman year anxiety caused me to gain ten pounds, 
sophomore year socializing caused me to lose a scholarship. 

After that, I tried to make a more conscious effort to study 
harder - 1 didn't mind studying, I just didn't have time for it. I was 
too wrapped up in extracurricular activities; too busy getting an 
"out-of -the-classroom education 

Then I went through the third stage - the one where my grades 
were back up to a level I could be proud of. I remembered why I 
came to Northwestern - for knowledge, understanding, for an 
opportunity to question. Gosh, I know that sounds corny, like 
something you would hear at an Ivy League commencement. 
But it's true. 

Last week, numerous students were steaming because a 
professor assigned a five-page paper, due in two weeks. Since 
the same class was being offered at the Fort Polk campus, well, 
you can guess what they're doing. 

College isn't an extension of high school. It is supposed to be 
the proverbial foyer to the hall of life. It should prepare us for 
what the real world will give us. It should provide us an un- 
threatened opportunity to explore ourselves; not just in a 
vocational sense, but also in an emotionat and intellectual one. 
A college graduate should have the broadness to accept new 
ideas, and welcome challenges. He should not reply with 
repulsion "how gross" when a newborn's life was saved with a 
baboon heart transfer. 

Northwestern has indeed been a comfortable existence. Life 
will, no doubt, be a rude awakening. 

And for some, more so than for others. 
Lisa Williams 

Managing Editor 



Current 
Sauce 
Staff 



John Ramsey 

Editor 

Lisa Williams 

Managing Editor 

Stacy Scroggins 

Business Manager 

Lucy LeBlanc 
Leah Sherman 
Darlene Winslow 

Advertising 

Russel Bienvenu 

Circulation 

Robin Cunter 

News 

John Cunningham 

Sports Editor 

Bryan Williams 

Layout 

Lejoyce Gaulden 
Susie Nevels 
David Silver 

Staff Writers 

Warren Tape 
Kevin Hopkins 

Photographers 

Peter Minder 

Adviser 

The Current Sauce 
newsmagazine is published 
weekly by students of 
Northwestern State 
University of Louisiana. It is 
student-run and financed, 
and is not associated with 
any of the University's 
colleges or departments. 

Editorial and business 
offices are located at Kyser 
Hall 225A. Office hours are 
1-4:30 pm Tuesday through 
Friday. The telephone 
number is (318)357-5456. 

All correspondence is 
welcome, and should be 
brought by the office or 
mailed to P.O. Box 5306, 
University Station, Nat- 
chitoches, LA 71497. 

Deadline for both ad- 
vertising and copy is 1 p.m. 
on the Thursday preceding 
Tuesday publication. All 
contributed items must be 
signed and must include a 
telephone number. Names 
will be withheld upon 
request. 

The mail subscription rates 
is $6.00 per semester. 
Current Sauce is entered as 
second class mail in Nat- 
chitoches, LA. USPS number 
140-660. 



PAGE 16 

Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority's annual Flea 
Market will be held Saturday from 9 a.m. -4 p.m. in 
the parking lot of the City Bank branch in the Dixie 
Plaza shopping center. An assortment of many 
good items: furniture, books, toys, miscellaneous, 
etc. EVERYTHING MUST GO!! No prior sales. 

Published articles and reviews by members of 
the University faculty are currently on display at 
the media and serials division of the Watson 
Library. 



Demon Connection, the annual hiqh school 

.visitation day, will be held on campus 
Wednesday. Visiting students from high schools 
in a tri-state area will be treated to many activities 
in most campus areas. For more information, dial 
357-5240. 



The Career Planning and Placement Office will 
feature career workshops on Tuesday and 
Wednesday in Union 321. Program times 
are 1 1 a.m., 1 and 3 p.m. For more information, 
call the Placement office at 357-5621 . 




Three art exhibitions continue 
at the New Orleans Museum 
of Art, housed at City Park 
in the crescent city. They are "New Orleans 
Collects Paperweights", "Painting in the Old 
South", and "The Precious Legacy: Judaic 
Treasures." All run through Sunday. Admission is 
charged. 



The "Amazing" 

turer, and magician. 
Friday in the Fine 
Fredericks Center 



James Randi, author, lec- 
will be presented at 10 a.m. 
Arts Auditorium of the A. A. 
This is a presentation of the 



Distinguished Lectuie Series, 
cancelled. Admission is free. 



and classes will be 



The dedication of the Biological Sciences 
Building as Rene J. Bienvenu Hall is set for 
Friday at the building. The program begins at 2 
p.m., and nearly 1,000 local and state officials 
have been invited to attend the ceremonies. 
Students are welcome to attend. 



A weight control group will meet for ten 
Wednesdays during the spring semester. The 
group will be led by Dr. Millard Bienvenu, director 
of the University Counseling Center. For more 
information, call the Center at 357-5901 . 

The rock band Boysengirls will be presented 
live in concert Friday and Saturday night at the 
Student Body nightclub on the Highway 1 Bypass. 
Doors open at 1 p.m., and admission is $3.00. 



Noteworthy 

Let us know what your 
group or organization is 
planning! Call the Sauce 
hotline 24 hours a day at 




357-5456 



The A. A. Fredericks Center's Orville Hanchey 
Gallery is currently featuring the University of 
New Mexico Print Show through next Friday. 
The gallery is open Monday through Friday from 8 
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Admission is free. 

The high school Solo and Small Ensemble 
Music Festival will be held next Friday and 
Saturday in the A. A. Fredericks Center For 
information, call 357-4522. 



The Louisiana Academy of Sciences' annual 
meeting is set for Thursday and Friday at the A. A. 
Fredericks Center. For information, call 357- 
5808. 



The NSU Wind Ensemble will perform in 
concert on Monday in the Recital Hall of the A. A. 
Fredericks Center. Admission is by ID. 




There will be an organizational meeting of the 
DPMA (NSU computer club) on Wednesday at 
6:15 p.m. in the Business Administration Bldg. 
Following this meeting, Apple Inc. will demon- 
strate the Macintosh personal computer at 7 p.m. 
in Union 320. Also, at 1 p.m. on the same day, 
Apple will have a Macintosh demonstration in the 
Computer Center. All interested parties are in- 
vited to attend. 



All young men interested in pledging Phi Beta 
Sigma are invited to the annual Spring Rush. 

The rush will be Tuesday in Union 320 at 7 p.m. 
Dress will be semi-formal. Refreshments will be 
served after the rush. 

Dr. Harold Morowitz, professor of biophysics 
and biochemistry at Yale University, will be a 
Distinguished Lecture Series speaker at 1 1 a.m. 
Friday, following James Randi. Admission is 
free, and classes will be dismissed. 




Movies at the Parkway 
Cinema this week include 
Protocol, Heavenly Bodies, Tomboy, and Night 
Patrol. Call the Theatre for showtimes at 357- 
5109. 

An exhibition of paintings and prints by Leslie 
Elliot goes on display Sunday in the Hanchey 
Gallery of the A. A. Fredericks Center. Admission . 
is free, and gallery hours are 8 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 
weekdays. 



Intramural action this week 
kicks off with Monopoly on 
Wednesday at 4 p.m. in the 
Union second floor lobby. 
Register at event. IM Poker is 
scheduled for Monday at 4 
p.m., also in the Union second 
floor lobby. Again, register at 
event. Intramural action continues next Wed- 
nesday with the Video Games tournament at 4 
p.m. in the Union games area. Registration is at 
the event. Basketball season continues 
throughout the week, with games nightly at 7 p.m.' 
in either the IM or P.E. Majors buildings. 

For more information, call 357-5461 . 




Current Quotes 



Are you happy with student media here at Northwestern? Why or why 
not? 




Sarah Nelkin 
1-2, Zoology 
Shreveport 

"Yes, I think 
us up to date 
'hat's going 
:ampus." 



that they keep 
with everything 
on around 



Unsuk Hall 

2-2, Fshn. Merchandising 
South Korea 

"Yes. when I do get a 
chance to look at the paper, 
it s enjoyable. But I think there 
should be more feature stories 
in the Sauce. 



Scott Ford 
4-2, IET 
Minden 

"No, because certain 
organizations give information 
to be put in the paper, but is 
not printed. I think the NSU 
Dictionary is a waste of 
space " 



Ronald Davis 
1-2, BuAd 
Leesville 

"Yes, I like the music on 
KNWD and the information I 
receive from the Current 
Sauce helps me out." 



Hanna El-Jor 
3-1, Pre-Dentistry 
Lebanon 

"Yes. I think we need the 
media to keep the students in 
touch with what's going on." 



■ 



Current Sauce 



Northwestern State University 

of Louisiana 

Natchitoches, LA 

Feb. 12, 1985 
Vol. 73, No. 15 




I 



Feb. 12, 1985 CURRENT SAl/Ct ' 'Vol. 73, No'. 1* 



News 



Students to vote on key issues in March 



by John Ramsey 

Editor 

On March 1 3, NSU students 

will vote not only tor SGA 
officers and senators, but will 
also pull levers for or against 
six separate proposals. 

All but one of the proposals 
involves student fees. This is 
the first time since the spring 
semester of 1983 that any 
bills concerning student fees 
has been offered to students. 

The possibilities are many as 
to what student fees will be 
beginning in the summer, 
since any combination of bills 
passing could alter the 



present structure. For the 
next three issues, the Current 
Sauce will publish either the 
actual bills or information 
about them to keep the 
student body informed. 

THE STUDENT TRUST FUND 
BILL was proposed by senator 
Rhonda Leydecker. This bill 
would add a $5 assessment 
each semester to student 
fees. A committee would be 
formed to oversee the usage 
of the fund, which could only 
be used for student projects. 
An example given by 
Leydecker: "suppose a 



student wanted to see 
racquetball courts con- 
structed. He could go before 
the committee, and then they 
would vote on it. Only 
students could decide what to 
do with the money." 

She added that it could be 
used for such major projects, 
or just for anything that 
"needs fixing" around campus 
which the University can't or 
won't pay for. 

A FEE INCREASE FOR 
POTPOURRI was authored by 
senator Eileen Haynes. Her 
bill said that since printing and 



CURRENTLY /FULL-TIME STUDENTS 


PROPOSED PART-TIME 


FALL 


SPRING 


SUMMER 




FALL 


SPRING 


SUMMER 


$15.00 


3.00 


$1.50 


Potpourri 








3.00 


Current Sauce 


$3.00 


$3.00 


$1.50 


1.00 


1.00 


.25 


Student Drama 


1.00 


1.00 


.25 


10.00 


10.00 


5.00 


Union program fee 


10.00 


10.00 


5.00 


20.00 


20.00 


20.00 


Rec. Complex fund 


15.00 


17.50 


27.50 


1.00 


1.00 


.50 


Union Board drama 


1.00 


1.00 


.50 


3.25 


3.25 


1.75 


SGA 






.50 


.50 


.25 


Alumni 


.50 


.50 


.25 


3.00 


3.00 


1.00 


KNWD-FM 


3.00 


3.00 


1.00 


1.00 


1.00 




Argus 


1.00 


1.00 


.50 


.50 


.50 


Cheerleaders 


.50 


.50 




2.00 


2.00 


1.00 


Intramurals 








1.00 


1.00 


1.00 


Rodeo team 








1.00 


1.00 


1.00 


Ski team 








.75 


.75 




Artist Series 


.75 


.75 




NOTE: 


IF PASSED, 


THE RECREATION COMPLEX 


FULL-TIME 


STUDENT 


FEE WILL 


CHANGE TO $15 IN FALL, $1 7.50 IN SPRING, AND $27.50 IN SUMMER. 





Demon Connection Set for Thursday 



Demon Connection, the 
University's annual visitation 
day for high school juniors and 
seniors from throughout the 
state, will be conducted 
Thursday on campus. 

Scheduled from 8:45 a.m. 
to 2 p.m., the program 
features campus tours, 
meetings with faculty, in- 
formation on academic 
programs, and sessions on 
financial aid. choosing a major, 
career outlooks, and campus 
organizations. 

Tony Hernandez, program 
coordinator, said registration 
will be held beginning at 8:45 
am in the Fine Arts 
Auditorium of the A. A. 
Fredericks Center. The 
program will begin at 9:15. 
with the welcome con- 
vocation. At 10 a.m.. 
students will then depart for 
departmental programs 

"Students will have the 



During any free time, 
students may sit in on a variety 
of selected college classes. 

At 1 p.m., the Entertainers 



will perform in concert, back in 
the A. A. Fredericks Center. 
After closing comments, the 
program officially ends at 2 

p.m. 



Applications Due for 
Potpourri Editorship 



Candidates aspiring to 
obtain the office of Editor-in- 
Chief of the Potpourri should 
file a "notice of intention" by 
noon, Feb. 15, 1985. 
Notices should be picked up 
and returned to Peter Minder, 
adviser to the Potpourri, at 
Kyser Hall225F. 

Specific responsibilities of 
the Editor-in-Chief are 
described in Article X of the 



SGA constitution, which can 

be found in the 1984-85 
Student Handbook. 
Qualifications include the 
completion of 45 semester 
hours with a 2.0 overall GPA, 
some hours of magazine 
editing coursework, and 
previous Potpourri ex- 
perience. 

Included in the "notice of 
intention" should be the 
names of proposed key staff 
members. 



labor costs have risen 
drastically since the last 
yearbook fee increase, the 
book deserves a $5 addition 
to its assessment, which 
would bring the total from $1 5 
to $20 in the fall semester. 
Students would still not pay 
any assessments for the 
yearbook in the spring. 

THE RENEWAL OF SKI TEAM 
FEES is automatically due to 
come up again this year, since 
it was first approved two years 
ago (most new bills must be 
renewed after their initial two 
years). Currently, students 
pay $1 per semester for ski 
team funding. If the renewal is 
passed, the team will continue 
to receive student money. 

THE RODEO TEAM 
RENEWAL, contrary to 
popular belief, is not set for a 
vote this year. It was originally 
approved to run for a trial 
period of four years, not two. 
The team will be re-voted on in 
1986. 

STUDENT APPROVAL OF A 
NEW SGA CONSTITUTION 

must also be voted on. The 
new constitution, according to 
Tod Klotzbach, SGA 
president, simply is a newer 
version of the old one, with the 
loopholes being tightened. 
"There really are no major 
changes," he said. 

STUDENT FEES FOR PART- 
TIME STUDENTS is likely to 
be the most controversial of 
the six. Currently, Nor- 
thwestern is the only school in 
the state where only full-time 
students pay fees. This 
proposal was passed 
unanimously by the SGA 
Finance Committee, chaired 
by Jon Robbins, SGA 
treasurer. Robbins added that 
"this will let part-time students 
share the burden. They won't 
pay for anything they don't 
use." 

Items to be funded by the 
part-time student fee proposal 
are Current Sauce, Argus, 
KNWD-FM, the Union program 
fee, the drama fee, the 
Recreation Complex, the 
Alumni fee, cheerleaders, 
Artist Series. If approved, 
part-time students will not pay 
for Potpourri, SGA, in- 
tramurals, rodeo team, or the 
ski team. 

To further complicate 
things, the Finance Committee 

see "SGA" 
on page 1 1 



Current Sauce 



Feb. 12,1985 
Vol. 73, No. 15 



On the Cover 

Mardi Gras is one of the 
thing's Louisiana is known 
for around the world. This 
week, Current Sauce takes 
a look at the holiday that is 
part of life in south 
Louisiana, yet somewhat 
confuses people in the 
northern half of our state. 

The cover photo shows 
just one of the many 
"krewes" and parades the 
crescent city has to offer 
this weekend. 

If Ringling Bros, truly 
have the "greatest show on 
earth," then Mardi Gras 
comes a close second. 

Hence, the "greatest 
free show on earth." 

See pages 8 and 9 - the 
'centerfold.' 

A recent report by two 
educational foundations 
says black college students 
set higher goals in school, 
but do not succeed as 
often as their white 
counterparts. Nor are they 
prepared as well in high 
school. 

See page 10 for an in- 
teresting study of this 
problem. 

The University Bookstore 
is one of the most verbally 
'abused' places on campus, 
yet it is something we 
"couldn't live without." 

See page 7. 

Cable TV has been in- 
stalled at dormitories at 
several schools. Have 
students' grades suffered 
any? Find out on page 1 0. 

On Wednesday, Nor- 
thwestern will host the 
Quest for Technology- 
What is this program and 
who is behind it? 

See page 6. 

The NSU Lady Demons 
lost to Grambling and Delta 
State last week, but 
bounced back to whip 
Nicholls State. For this plus 
the score of last night*! 
NSU-Southeastern game, 
see page 13. 

Cathy Ernst, Steve 
Horton, and Greg Shoalrm re 
are now SGA senators. 
See page 4 for the relate" 

story. 



New security measures 
were recently implemented 
on campus, and housira 
director Mickie Townsen" 
is pleased thus far. 

See page 3 for the story 



i 



11)111''" 



Feb. 12, 198S CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73, No. 1* 



PACE 3 



>85 
15 



the 
•wn 
"his 
kes 
it is 
>uth 
/hat 
the 



Housing director pleased with new security measures 



by Lisa Williams 

Managing Editor 

NSU students are "showing 
lot more maturity these 
days," said Mickie Townsend, 
coordinator of housing. 

Students are beginning to 
realize that they have to take 
responsibility for their own 
safety." 

Townsend said Thursday 
that dorm residents have 
responded favorably to recent 



housing security measures 
that had been taken as a result 
of last semester's attacks and 
alleged incidents of rape. 

"We had expected a big 
uproar when we started 
locking the dorm doors at 6 
p.m., but the response has 
been just the opposite. There 
have been a lot less propped- 
open doors than in previous 
semesters." 

Other safety measures 
include spotlights of the roof 



of Louisiana Hall, changing the 
back doors of Natchitoches 
Hall from combination locks to 
key locks and more frequent 
rounds by security monitors at 
Sabine Hall. 

Townsend said that housing 
employees check lights 
outside the residence halls at 
night and replace any that are 
burned out. "We have found 
that it is better to have them do 
that at night when it is dark," 
she said. 




"We have requested 
spotlights for Natchitoches 
Hall to shine in the courtyard, 
but Maintenance has been 
slightly behind schedule. 

"At Natchitoches Hall, it got 
to a point where the com- 
bination locks just weren't 
working and we replaced them 
with key locks. The back 
lobby door leading to the 
women's wing is also keyed. If 
someone manages to get into 
the lobby, he can't get to the 
women's wing, unless 
someone lets him in, of 
course. We've done 
everything but cut that wing 
off completely," Townsend 
replied with a smile. 

"At Sabine, there was a 
problem with the 6 p.m. 
closing because many 
residents had late classes in 
the TEC or PE Majors 
buildings. So from six until 
nine, there is a staff member 
sitting at the back door to let 
people in. That is a big building 
to have to walk around," she 
laughed. 

At Varnado, burned out 
lights were replaced. She 
said, "nothing was wrong with 
the combination locks, but we 
will probably change the 
combination soon just to 
shake everybody up." 

"An overall campus lighting 
project is on schedule," she 
continued. "We should see 

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some evidence of the 
progress around the middle of 
the semester as lights start 
cropping up everywhere." 



Literary 
Contest 
Planned 



A Literary contest for poetry 
is being sponsored by the 
Lesche Club, a local literature 
organization for women. 

The club has been in 
existence since 1894 and is 
the oldest club in Nat- 
chitoches. The original pur- 
pose for the Lesche was for a 
study group with emphasis on 
literature. 

The prizes are $25 for first 
place, $15 for second place 
and $1 for third place. 

The rules for entering are: 

1 ) Applicant must be a full- 
time undergraduate student. 

2) Poetry must be free 
verse, a rhyming verse, one or 
more poems accepted, none 
to exceed 50 lines. 

3) Make three copies 
(typed) with social security 
number on the back. 

4) Include a 3 x 5 card with 
your name, social security 
number, address, phone 
number, number of poems 
being entered and titles of 
poems. 

Submit all entries to Barbara 
Gillis, coordinator of orien- 
tation in Old Trade School 
102. 

The deadline is March 29 at 
4 p.m. 

Winners will be notified in 
April. 



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PAGE 4 



Fe*>.12,1985 CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73, No. 16 _____ 



Klotzbach appoints three to serve as SGA senators 



SGA president Tod Klotz- 
bach selected three students 
last week to replace former 
senators Eileen Haynes, Chris 
Maggio and Jim Martin. 

Chosen to the senator-at- 
large positions were freshmen 



Cathy Ernst and Steve Horton, 
along with junior Greg 
Shoalmire. 

"All three expressed an 
interest in serving on the 
SGA," said Klotzbach. "Greg 
is one of the best workers 



Wyble explains 
SGA projects 



Beginning this week, a brief 
summary of all SGA meetings 
will be printed in the Current 
Sauce. 

This week, however, the 
SGA meeting was cancelled 
because of lack of quorum. 

Current Sauce did manage 
to find out what's going on in 
SGA by contacting Shawn 
Wyble, vice-president. 

Elections for everything 
from senators to approval of a 
new constitution will be held 
on March 13 in the Union 
lobby. Candidate filing for 
these positions will open on 
Feb. 27 and will close on 




March 6. Among the topics to 
be voted on: renewal of the 
assessment for the rodeo and 
ski teams, part-time fees, a 
fee increase for Potpourri, and 
a new SGA constitution. 

An SGA open house is 
scheduled for Feb. 26-27. 
Refreshments will be served, 
and anyone interested in 
student government asked to 
come by and meet the current 
SGA leaders, said Wyble. 

One idea Wyble said SGA is 
working on is the construction 

cinema 



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of a marquee to replace the 
old one across the street from 
the Union (next to Nat- 
chitoches Hall). The new one 
would be electronic, and 
would be placed on the edge 
of campus to let Natchitoches 
residents as well as Nor- 
thwestern students know 
what is scheduled on campus. 



SGA has ever had, Steve 
really wanted to do the job, 
and Cathy has been attending 
meetings regularly as a 
member of the Supreme 
Court." 

Haynes and Martin resigned 
their positions to concentrate 
on academic progress, as 
both are graduating seniors. 
Maggio was forced to resign 
because of conflicts with a 
Monday night class; SGA 
meetings are also on Mon- 
days. 

Jeff Eversull, sophomore 
senator, transferred to the 
University of Southwestern 
Louisiana for the spring 



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semester, leaving his seat 
vacant. According to the 
constitution the president can 
appoint students only if less 
than 60 days remain in the 
term. Since there are more 
than 60 days until next fall's 
class elections, Eversull's 
replacement will be elected in 
a special election in March. 

Klotzbach said that although 
his term as president is 



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We're looking for self-starters 
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To qualify for the SED 
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PAGE 6 



Feb. 1 2, 1 985 CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73, No. 1 6 



'Quest for Technology' Set for Wednesday 



Northwestern, along with 
other colleges and universities 
in the state, has chosen to 
participate in a Board of 
Regents-sponsored program 
that seeks to increase the 
university's revenue from 
technology through an 
organized program - the 
Quest. 

Representatives of Control 
Data Corporation in Min- 
neapolis, and Gulf South 
Research Irstitu'e in Baton 
Rouge will be on campus 
Wednesday, to conduct a 
seminar which will present 
information on the Quest for 
Technology program. 

The seminar at 4 p m in 
Kyser Hall 142 is open to 
faculty and staff members, 
students, alumni and people 
'iving in communities served 
by thp University 

According to Dr. David 
Dobbins, NSU's coordinator of 
the Quest, the program is 
designed to identify 
technologies, "know-how," 
for technology management. 
"We are not seeking bright 
ideas unsupported by some 
expertise, experience, know- 
how resources or facility. 
Rather, we are seeking areas 
of know-how which are in a 
fairly easily transferable form, 
and for which the submitter 
can see a need, an ap- 
plication, a use, either in the 
university or industry." 

The Quest is open to all 
Northwestern faculty, 
students, staff, Northwestern 
alumni and members of the 
community served by Nor- 
thwestern. 

Benefits for successful 
technology transfers can 
include a share in fees, 
royalties, etc. for the inventor, 
his or her department and the 
university. 

"The period for submission 
of technologies, "know-how," 
will last at least eight weeks 
and will begin in early 
February following our 
Technology Transfer 
Seminar." 

Northwestern and several 
other colleqes and universities 
m Louisiana are participating in 
Quest for Technology, a 
program sponsored in this 
state by the Board of Regents. 

Dr Dave Dobbins NSU's 
coordinate' for the program, 
said Quest for Technology has 
been designed by Worldtech. 
Inc.. a subsidiary of Control 
Data, to identify technologies 
for technology management 
and transfer. 

"We aro searching for 
technology, anything that can 
be marketed.'' said Dobbins. 
"It might be administrative 
technigues. it might be 
financial techniques or a 
seminar that someone has It 
must be something useful that 



can be marketed, and its 
application has to be 
universal." 

He added, "Application of 
the technologies we are 
searching for means that it has 
use, that it fulfills someone's 
need. The buyer has to have a 
need, which is being filled by 
this know-how or technology 
that a person intends to sell." 

Dobbins said the seminar is 
designed to explain the 
process of technology and the 
procedure for submitting 
know-how or technology to 
the Quest for Technology 
program. 

"We will have a technology 
review board that simply 
decides if this know-how or 
technology is beyond the idea 
stage and if it fulfills specific 
criteria." stated Dobbins. "If it 
does. ii then goes on to Gulf 
South Research Institute, 
which is the primary con- 



tractor between the board of 
Regents and the universities." 

Dobbins said the Quest for 
Technology program at 
Northwestern is seeking areas 
of unique expertise, 
knowledge, service or any 
other resource which is in a 
transferable form. 

Examples, he said, are 
inventions, laboratory 
technology, manufacturing 
and production techniques 
and processes, special 
measurement and analysis 
techniques, know-how in 
uncommon subjects, un- 
common administrative 
procedures or systems, 
unique equipment capabilities, 
unique department capabilities 
and unique financial tools or 
systems. 

In Quest for Technology, 
the benefits are money for 
individuals whose 
technoloqies are successully 



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transferred. 

"These benefits are in the 
form of royalties, fees to the 
inventor, for employees of the 
university," stated Dobbins. 
"A portion of the royalties and 



fees paid to university em- 
ployees, students, alumni and 
others will go to the university 
to be used for research and 
the development of scholarly 
activities." 



not including members of 
the armed services — are 
now living overseas. These 
people are engaged in nearly 
everypossible activi- 
ty. ..construction, engineer- 
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secretarial work, accoun- 
ting, manufacturing, oil 
refining, teaching, nursing, 
government, etc. -etc. And 
many are earning $2,000 to 
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To allow you the op- 
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(1) . Our International 
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west coast. You will be told 
what type of positions the 
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such as deck hands, 
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(2) . Firms and .organiza- 
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(5) . How and where to ap 
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ifii. Information about 
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(7). You will receive oui 
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Feb. 1 2, 1 985 CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73, No. 1 6 



PACE 7 



ay 

sity em- 
jmni and 
.niversity 
irch and 
scholarly 

NT 

VOMKN' 
SOUTH 

WAGES' 



Bookstore: A place none of us could live without 



by Ricky Moore 

Staff Writer 

It's one of the most griped 
about, complained about and 
grumbled about places on this 
campus and none of us could 
do without it. It's the 
bookstore. And yes, books 
are sometimes late and prices 
are high, but it's better to have 
a late costly book than none at 
all. 

Yes, it does seem to suck 



up students' money like a 
rampaging vacuum cleaner. 
But what makes this vacuum 
cleaner run, and who runs it 
and what are some of its extra 
features? 

The person who runs it is 
Darlene Rachal. She has 
worked there for 1 4 years and 
been the manager since 
1 979. She said she prefers to 
be called Darlene. 

Rachal said that the 
bookstore supplies all books 



e South 
st South 
ery pari 

c s and 
jencies' 
l in near- 
in. from 
er to the 
Sessional 

oreaniza- 
"eign con- 
manufac' 

refining. 

services. 

ere to ap- 
)vernmeni 

on abotij 

_>ceive oui 
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urrent job 
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money P r ' 
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This Week 
at the 
Student Body 



mployneo 

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may return 
t basis 1 
.. for you' 



TUESDAY NIGHT 

E Phi Mu fundraiser 

WEDNESDAY 

\ $5 BEER BUST 
$1 TOM COLLINS 
$1.50 BAR DRINKS 

THURSDAY 

MARDI GRAS 

MAMBO 

Costume contest: 
grand prize for singles 
and groups 
FREE BEADS AND DOUBLOONS 



and materials that students 
need to attend Northwestern. 
They also have paperback 
novels, magazines, toiletries, 
clothes, jewelry and lab 
supplies. She said, "We even 
order lab specimens for 
Biology: cats, sharks and 
necturus (a type of fish.)" She 
said they also supply the 
office needs for the entire 
University. 

Rachal then explained many 
of the extra services at the 
bookstore. First of all, they will 
order special books for 
students or faculty. They also 
have a check cashing service 
($25 limit), and a 
photoprocessing service. 

She said that she wanted to 
explain her policy for buying 
back books since students 
often become irritated with her 
when she cannot buy them 
back. 



At the beginning of the 
semester, she will buy books 
back at the purchase price for 
two weeks after classes start. 

However, before she will 
buy them back, a student 
"must have his register 
receipt." Also, if he dropped 
the course, he must have his 
drop slip, or, if he resigned 
from the University, he must 
have the proper supporting 
papers. 

She emphasized that 
students should not mark in 
new books for the first two 
weeks because then she 
would only return 75 percent 
of the purchase price. Also, 
she said that if the University 
cancels a course, she will buy 
those books back. 

At the end of the semester, 
Rachal said that she gives 50 
percent of the purchase price 
for the books. A student must 



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have his ID, and she strongly 
emphasized that a student not 
try to sell back stolen books. 
"You will get caught, so don't 
try it, "she said. 

Rachal then had a few 
words to say about shoplifting. 
She said she has had a big 
problem with it in the past, bu' 
she is in the process of in- 
stalling a new security system 
that should eliminate much of 
it. 

When asked what happens 
to shoplifters, she said it 
depends on how much was 
stolen. Anything over $25 and 
they are prosecuteo; anything 
under $25 and they are 
turned over to the Dean of 
Students for punishment. 

Rachal said that the 
bookstore comes under the 
University's Systems Budget. 
What that means is that she 
does not receive one dime 
from the University. The 
money that pays the staff of 
six and two student workers, 
and all the utilities, comes out 
of bookstore revenue. 

She said that she is not only 
responsible for the bookstore 
on campus, but also for the 
other full-time store located at 
Fort Polk and for the two part- 
time campuses, one at 
England AFB and the other at 
the Shreveport campus. 




The Consumer Information Center of the 
U S General Services Administration puts 
the Catalog together quarterly to make sure 
you get inn most up to-dale information 

So send for a copy and shed some tight 
on your problems Its tree (or the asking 
Just write - 

CONSUMER INFORMATION CENTER 
DEPT. LB 
PUEBLO, COLORADO 81009 




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Rex, the King of Mardi Gras himself, parades through downtown New Orleans during 
Carnival 1984. 



Will you be attending Mardi Gras this year? 





Mark Birch 
4-2, Bus. Adm. 
Syracuse, NY 

"Yes, I'll be in Morgan City 
because it's a little less rowdy 
there. My wife is pregnant 
and I don't want her to get 
bounced around." 



Emilyn Matthews 
1-2, Accounting 
Natchitoches 

"Yes, because I've never 
been to Mardi Gras and it's 
time to kick up my heels and 
party!" 



Ernest White 

3-2, Public Relations 

Natchitoches 

"No, because I have to work 
and because I'm a Christian 
and would not be able to 
participate in the parties." 



8 — Covory 



The Greatfre 
Show on Eaf hi 
New Orlearext 



Mardi Gras, termed by visitors as the "Greatest Free Shew i money rei 
Earth," is the period when hundreds of thousands of U out of t 
citizens and visitors give expression to their festive feei cations thr 
before the Lenten period of fast. It is a season marked noadvertisi 
wholesome fun, spontaneous gaiety and feasting. * the then 

Literally, Mardi Gras applies to Shrove Tuesday ■■ the Med for pr 
before Ash Wednesday, which opens the Lenten season om in the I 
fact, Mardi Gras means "Fat Tuesday." Actually, the term M ig, spotlighti 
Gras is popularity applied to the two weeks during whicti » costumin 
various street parades are held. i of the b£ 

The terms "Carnival" and "Mardi Gras" are not necessres sketch* 
synonymous. The Carnival season opens officially on Jan n, Dukes, fV 
twelve nights after Christmas, and is marked by a success) ilform trie < 
elaborate private balls . i is always < 

The Mardi Gras season, on the other hand, opens twowt sgofthe Me 
before Shrove Tuesday and is marked by a series of sfiival balls an 
parades and masking in which the general public and testation, issue 
thousands of visitors participate. Mardi Gras, then, servshonal invitat 
the climax of the Carnival season . It is diff ic 

fc " ft Is acqi 

ORIGIN M 

Just when the European custom of celebrating Mardi I 
made its bow in New Orleans is shrouded in mystery. Or* Mi Gras oe 
relates that as soon as the city was founded by Bien* si<j|| ed de ^ 
impromptu Mardi Gras celebration was held by his men It eas 0n j s en( 
fact, however, that several years prior to the founding of the ^ designs 
by a party of French colonizers, headed by Iberville, camp« aided. On w 
the Mississippi River, 30 miles from its mouth. Noting that 'eetwide th 
day was March 3, 1699, Mardi Gras of that year, 
recorded that the location was officially named "Point def 
Gras." Quite possible some observance of the holiday 1 
place, the first in Louisiana. 

Because the original inhabitants of the city were a | 
people, it is not surprising that sort Mardi Gras celeW 
became customary soon after the colony was established^ 
celebrations took the form of balls and masquerade P 
with, perhaps, some spontaneous street masking. In H 
newspaper chronicled an organized street pageant 
unorganized masquerading took place prior to that date. 



4 "ted tho fn^t 

It was 1857, however, that the street pageants W ^ * r00 ' 
assume their present day shape, for in that year came tWJ ^ ' "is 
of the Mistick Krewe of Comus and the first night par* Jo at • ' n e 



Kre * ^are mai 

Comus still parades on Mardi Gras night. But unlike t- propr 



torchlight procession built around the 
Actors in Milton's Paradise Lost." As in 1857, the 



uction of 
* clothed 
^ until tr 
The th< 
I that d; 
, ^w float 
frawn by mL 
te . makin< 
flambeal 
Parades 



CARNIVAL BALLS 



, s tothe tr 
sed. 



major Carnival organizations have joined the Mardi Gras 
frolic. Rex, King of 
made his first appearance 
birth of the Knights 

made its appearance. The Knights of Hermes made tne ^asso nQ 
1957. Among the newer organizations who give pa^ "tig at ' 
Helois, Choctaw, Pandora, Mokana, Mecca, ^Nhisk 
Okeanos, Alia, Freret, Hercules, Pagasus, Babylon. Sfazb**™ 
Diana, Iris, Crela, Endymion, Jason, Thoth, Venus 
Poseidon, Bacchus, Zeus, Zulu, Arabi, Orleanians, 
City and Cronus. 



*#fofT beau ty 



an 



There are approximately 65 Carnival organizations nev er a 

treetPT"" - 



produce. 



Orleans. Each gives an annual ball, some present 
in addition. The average Carnival ball costs about $2 ^ oeriod 




Vol. 73, No. 1 6 CURRENT SAUCE Feb. 1 2, 1 985 




"Gimme' somethin' mister!" will become 
a familiar cry this weekend in the crescent 
city as more than 1,000,000 people will 
celebrate Mardi Gras. 



atfree 
Ef hits 
>aiext week 




reeShoi money required for staging these balls and the parades, 
inds of w out of the pockets of the members of the Carnival 
stive feel cations through dues and assessments. No tickets are 
i marked no advertising is permitted, no commercialism is tolerated. 

t the theme of the ball is selected, a scenic artist is 
iy ■- the ted for proper stage settings and decorations for the 
n season om in the Municipal Auditorium of the Rivergate. Stage 
ie term 11 ig, spotlighting and dramatic effects are then planned, 
ng which i costuming becomes the important requirement. The 

s of the ball is discussed with a costume maker who 
it necess res sketches of costumes suitable for the King, the 
ly on Jan n, Dukes, Maids, Captain, Pages and the Krewe members 
successialform the cast. 

i is always an outstanding civic leader and is considered 
ns two we ngof the Mardi Gras. 

ries of si W balls are private, social functions. Admission is strictly 
z and ten ilation, issued by a member of the Krewe involved. Each is 
an, serves sonal invitation to a lady or gentleman and is not tran- 
sit is difficult for a visitor to get a Carnival ball invitation 
* to is acquainted with a member of the Krewe issuing 

,g Mardif PARADES 

,terv ' ^pi Gras parade is a work of art-the product of corps of 
>y Bienvf 'skilled designers and builders. Shortly after one Mardi 
'' S ^Hhe ^ is ended ' P ,ans are made for the next. Themes are 
dingot p M, designs are drawn and in secret dens the work starts 
le ' cam trdL ed On wheeled flat cars about twenty feet long and 
JOt ' n9 n* 8etwide ' tne artificers build the papier-mache' creations. 
y ear ' de y "Notion of the floats-there are from 15 to 20 in each 
hniidav I ^ cl °thed with secrecy. The floats are never seen by 
3 noiw *kum\ the day or night they appear in the street 



The theme of the parade and ball is never made 



relent* that dav - Eacn new Mardi Gras brin 9 s new P arade 
a hi Qhed S i new tloat creations. Floats in the parades traditionally 

rade otffeiT by mules until tne Motor Age made these animals 
je in 18 31 S 6 ' makin 9 necessary the substitution of tractors. The 
1 pageant ^ ,lam beaux, or torchlights, are still used to illuminate 

[t ^befl* 2 M the foot Police are in the vanguard of. the procession . 
me W 1 ? and nis ai des, mounted, masked and costumed, are 

C ht ci* 1 r t nce - Tnen come the Kin 9' s float ' tne title float and the 
n '?,^ h g rjf! C s which interpret the theme of the parade. These 

the tes e manned °y Krewe members, all masked and in 

' . 357; impropriate to the common theme, who throw 

at Gras P 1 ^ the throngs in the streets. Numerous bands are 

^ear^ 1 fee? 6 Mardi Gras P eriod - the streets and buildings are 
e ^,e of flCi?!! ed wim the official colors of purple, green and gold. 



ide their' 



m °st heard is "If Ever I Cease to Love," the official 
sona. 




6 ofK at 10 am - on Mardi Gras day ' Rex and tne 

°' his Krewe parade through the thronged streets of 

^beauty in the sunlight is breathtaking. Following the 

great monarch come those of the Krewes of 

ig^ an d Crescent City-lavishly decorated trucks 

'soro^ry maske rs made up from the memberships of 

lf s , s i nt| es and other groups. 

izations f never a dull moment in New Orleans on Mardi Gras 

it str|^ ^ «n nightfall brings the parade of Comus, the public 

3ut Pday D n riod com es to an end. On the next day, Ash 

y Oceanians go to church and back to work. 




The "Boeuf Gras", or fat ox. 
This float is a traditional crowd 
favorite at New Orleans' 
biggest Mardi Gras parade 
REX. 




Feb. 12, 1 985 CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73, No. 1 6 



10 



Close-Up 




Says national educational foundation: 



Black collegians set higher 
Priorities, but fail more often 




Although black collegians set higher degree 
goals than do their white counterparts, they do 
not succeed as often or as rapidly, according to 
a new report by the Ford and Southern 
Education foundations. 

The report, entitled "The Causes and 
Consequences of College Students' Per- 
formance," found that white students have a B 
grade average while black students are bet- 
ween B- and C-plus. The report also found that 
55.7 percent Of black students drop out 
compared with 38.4 percent of white students, 
and that black students take an average of one 
term longer to graduate. 

Black students experience more 
discrimination and "interfering problems" and 
white students are more satisfied with campus 
life and are better off financially. 

The researchers concluded that, "Univer- 
sities need to take specific, long-term 
measures to assist black students to improve 
their retention rates, progression rates, and 
college grade point averages." 

Further, the "qualitative aspects" of college 
desegregation must be addressed. Michael 
Nettles of rtie Educational Research Service 
describes "qualitative aspects" as the ac- 
cessibility and quality of relationships with the 
faculty; social aspects of campus life; and ihe 
benefit of college experience as measured by 
GPAs, graduate admissions, and the value of a 
college education in the labor market. 



"The qualitative aspects, the increasing 
numbers of minority students attending 
previously segregated colleges and white 
students going to black colleges, are very 
important," he says. "These represent 
equality of opportunity, but the qualitative 
aspects represent the equality of per- 
formance." 

Racial and financial barriers hindering black 
students are compounded, the student found, 
by less than adequate preparation for college in 
high school. On average, white students have 
higher SAT scores and better grades in high 
school. 

The report points out that these differences 
in college performance vary with the type of 
institution and according to which race is in the 
minority. For instance, 80 percent of white 
students in black public colleges drop out over 
a four-year period, compared to only 60 
percent for blacks. Thus, "Minority status 
rather than race per se may account for some 
of the racial differences observed," say 
researchers. Of the black students in the study 
sample, 55 percent were in the minority on 
campus, compared with 12.3 percent of the 
white students. 

Report copies are available from the Ten- 
nessee Higher Education Commission, 501 
Union Building, Suite 300, Nashville, TN 
37219. 



Cable TV causing no problems 



When ZZ Top and Indiana Jones move into 
residence halls, do college students become 
television junkies glued to the tube? 

Traditionally, college students are not big 
television watchers, but with a growing number 
of residence halls providing access to cable 
television in both public lounges and private 
rooms some administrators feared that movie, 
music, and sports channels would prove too 
great a distraction. 

A random survey of housing directors and 
deans of student affairs by National On- 
Campus Report, however, found that cable TV 
isn't adversely affecting the academic pursuits 
of America's collegians 

Bob Clay, assistant dean of students at the 
University of Kentucky, kept a watchful eye for 
students neglecting schoolwork in favor of 
television this fall when UK first offered access 
to cable TV in dorm rooms. "After reviewing 
GPA s." Clay says, "my impression is that that 
didn't happen " 



At Texas A&M. where dorm residents have 
had access to cable for nearly 1 years, vice- 
president for student services John Koldus 
says, "It's not been a problem." 

That isn't to say that college students aren't 
part of the television generation: 30 percent of 
UK's 5,000 dorm residents signed up for cable 
TV and 85 percent at Florida State University 
either had a television or planned to bring one. 
"I guess I'm the last of the non-television 
generation," says Sherrill Ragans, director of 
housing at FSU. "I enjoy TV but I don't have to 
have it on every single minute like these kids." 

Ragans added that FSU has long had cable in 
its dorm TV lounges and University-owned 
apartments and that no scholastic problems 
have come of it. 

This seems to indicate, to Ragans and 
others, that college students enjoy watching 
television but can prudently balance their 
viewing and their studying. 



Z2 




1 



Demons vs. Stephen F. Austin 



Thursday night, 7:30, 
Prather Coliseum 



USA ON- 
CAMPUS 



A SEMESTER OF COM- 
PLAINTS has not moved the 
U. of Montevallo (Alabama) 
housing director. The UM 
housekeeping staff ceased 
supplying toilet tissue to 
students living in rooms with 
private baths this fall and has 
no plans to resume supply. 
The student government is 
now selling tissue for 25 cents 
a roll. 

MACHO NERDS FOR 
REAGAN and Girl Geeks for 
the Gipper claim to represent 
the true spirit of Reaganism 
and have been stealing the 
show at the U. of Wisconsin's 
College Republicans' pro- 
Reagan rallies. The Nerds' 
platform includes national 
standards for lawn care and a 
chain of retail stores called 
"Wars R Us" to reduce the 
deficit. 

IGNORING ILLNESS is a 

cultural characteristic of 
American collegians. Ac- 
cording to research by an 
Austin Peay State U. 
professor, comparing illness 
behavior of U.S. students with 
that of their Third World 
counterparts, Americans tend 
to ignore illness and resist 
seeking medical help unless 
their symptoms appear life- 
threatening. 

RACIST VANDALISM 
ANGERED Yale U. students, 
who protested to the college 
dean when they heard that 
three students would receive 
only a reprimand for paintina 
"KKK" on an Asian-American 
woman's door. 

A NON-ALCOHOLIC PUNCH 
RECIPE BOOK s available 
courtesy of the U. of Alabama- 
Birmingham Greek com- 
munity. The recipes are 
entries from a punch contest 
held at a Greek-sponsored 
party in honor of the UAB 
basketball team. 

HOUSE PARENTS FOR 
FRATERNITIES? In 

terfraternity Council leaders at 
the U. of Florida are con- 
sidering taking legal action if 
the administration follows a 
special task force recom- 
mendation and requires 
fraternities to have resident 
advisers. The recom- 
mendation stems from an 
alleged gang rape at a LlF 
fraternity house. 

EATING WELL EARNS YOU 
MONEY at Valparaiso U. On 
unannounced days, students 
who buy something from a" 
four food groups receive a 1 0" 
percent discount from the VU 
food service. 



Vol. 73, No. 16 CURRENT SAUCE Feb. 12, 1985 



PAGE 11 



To serve as Alumni Center 



Old President's Home Being Remodeled 




Getting a facelift... 

The Old President's Home will be renovated within the next few weeks to house the 
Northwestern Alumni Office. The project should be complete by the summer, when the 
Alumni Office will move to the building from the A.A. Fredericks Center. 



by Lisa Williams 

Managing Editor 

The home of Northwestern 
presidents, from its con- 
struction in 1 924 until the mid 
1 970s when the new 
structure was built on South 
Jefferson Drive, the Old 
Presidents Home located on 
College Avenue will undergo 
renovation beginning this 
semester. 

Until recently, the Tudor- 
styled building served as a 
home management residence 
for students majoring in home 
economics. 

According to Leigh Wood 
Jonson, coordinator of the 
NSU Entertainers and alumni 
facilities, bids from con- 
tractors were opened 
Tuesday and contract rights 
w9re awarded to the lowest 
bidders. 

The contractor has an 
amount of time before he must 
legally begin work, "but we 
are anticipating that the 
renovations should actively 
start March 1. We are 
shooting for a completion date 



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of Oct. 1 ."she said. 

The sixty-one-year old 
structure "will house the 
offices of External Affairs -- 
the Entertainers, NSU 
Foundation, Alumni Affairs -- 
all of the directors and the 
support personnel. 

With the renovations, the 
ten -room building will have one 
bathroom removed. "We are 
not knocking down walls -- all 
of the rooms will remain the 
same." 

She added that some of the 
oak wood floors would be 
kept. "We are trying to 
maintain the authenticity of the 
antiquity of the area, but of 
course, certain modifications 
will have to be made. Upstairs 
will be all offices and naturally 
that area will be designed to fit 
office needs." 

"Downstairs we will keep for 
entertaining and visiting," she 
continued. "My office will be 
downstairs so that visitors will 
have a friendly face to see 
when they come inside." The 
living room will be a gathering 
room and the dining room kept 
for entertainment events." 

Regarding furnishings for 
the building, Jonson said that 
she hoped "older misplaced 
pieces of furniture would be 
donated to the project to be 
put in a more timely en- 
vironment." 

Along with a facelift in the 
next few months, the Old 
Presidents Home will get a 
new name but Jonson said 
that the current term "Alumni 
Center' really is "too exclusive 
for the other activities" they 
are involved with. 

The ideas for remodeling the 
home came from the Alumni 
Center at USL. They, too, 
renovated their old home 
management residence. 
"Ours has the potential to be 
even better because it is older 
and a more beautiful building." 

"We would certainly ap- 
preciate any input or 
donations of furniture or 
money to make the project 
better. We want it to be 
comfortable for our alumni and 
visitors." 



SGA 



continued from 
page 2 

agreed that, it the resolution is 
passed, the Rec Complex fee 
structure would be altered. 
Instead of paying $20 in the 
fall, spring and summer, 
students would pay $1 5 in the 
fall and $17.50 in the spring, 
but $27.50 in the summer. 
Robbins explains "we found 
that the complex just isn't 
open enough in the regular 
semesters to warrant paying 
the same as in the summer, 
when it's open every day." 



Feb. 12, 1985 CURRENT SAUCE VoL 73, No. 16 



12 




The mens and women's 
tennis teams opened the 
season on Saturday picking up 
where the left off last year - 

winning. 

The defending Trans 
America champions, now in 
the Gulf Star Conference, 
blitzed East Texas Baptist in 
afternoon matches at the NSU 
Tennis Complex. Both the 
men and women shut out the 
East Texans by 9-0 scores. 

Mens' singles winners in- 
cluded Jorge Salvo, 6-1. 6-2; 
Morris Brown, 6-1, 6-0; 
Francisco Acuna, 6-1, 6-2; 
Pierre Genevier, 6-4, 6-7, 6- 
1 ; Claudio Semmelmann, 6-3, 
6-2; Alex Reich, 6-0, 6-0. 

Mens doubles saw Salvo- 



Acuna win 6-1, 6-4; Brown- 
Semmelmann, 6-0, 7-6; and 
Genevier-Reich, 6-2, 6-0. 

Winners of the women's 
matches were Tory Plunkett, 
6-1, 6-0; Ana Maria de 
Felippo, 6-1, 6-0; Angie 
Peterson, 6-0, 6-0; Kim 
Tollett, 6-0, 6-0; Monica 
Isaza, 6-2, 6-0; and Karla 
Tubbs. 6-0, 6-0. 

Doubles action gave wins to 
Plunkett-Peterson, 6-0. 6-0; 
Isaza-de Felippo, 6-0, 6-0; 
and Tollett-Tubbs, 6-0, 6-0. 



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Sports 

Demons taking 10-day break; 
Freshman Jones leads team 



Going for two 

Northwestern freshman George Jones, a product of 
Shreveport's Captain Shreve High School, puts the ball up in 
a recent home game against the Southeastern Lions. The 
Demons couldn't pull it out, however... 

Jones leads the team in scoring with 14.0 points per game. 
He is fourth in Gulf Star statistics with 20 points per game in 
five GSC outings thus far. 

Heading into a home game on Thursday with Stephen F. 
Austin in the Coliseum, the Demons are 2-20 overall and 1-5 
in the Gulf Star. 

Tennis Teams Destroy 
East Texas, 9-0, 9-0 



In the middle of a 10 day 
break before heading into the 
final six games of the season, 
the Demon basketball team 
continues to be led by 
freshman forward George 
Jones. 

The 6-6 forward from 
Shreveport scored a season 
high 28 points and matched 
his high of 1 5 rebounds in the 
last Demon outing, an 84-71 
loss at Sam Houston. The 
Demons will resume action on 
Thursday at home against 
Stephen F. Austin. 

Northwestern is 2-20 on the 
season and 1-4 in Gulf Star 
Conference play, with the one 
bright spot being the season- 
long play of Jones. Jones 
currently leads the team in 
scoring (14.0), rebounding 
(7.3) and blocked shots, while 
also ranking second in field 
goal percentage at 53 per- 
cent. 

Jones has been even more 
impressive in the five Gulf Star 
games, averaging 20 points 
and 10.6 rebounds, while still 
shooting 53 percent from the 
field. In Conference statistics 
this week Jones is fourth in 
scoring, second in reboun- 
ding, ninth in field goal per- 
centage and third in blocked 
shots. 



Sophomore forward 
Sylvester Smith and junior 
center Donald Mays also rank 
in conference statistics this 
week. Smith is eighth in 
scoring at 1 2 points per game 
and 10th in rebounding at 5.1 
per contest. Mays is shooting 
an even 60 percent from the 
field to rank third in the league. 

As a team the Demons are 
the league leaders in average 
rebounds (36.6) and 
rebounding margin (0.9). The 
Demons are fourth in field goal 
defense (49.1), fifth in both 



free throw percentage (63.4) 
and field goal percentage 
(47.4 percent) and sixth in 
scoring margin (-14.3). 

Four of the final six games 
on the Demon schedule are at 
home, with the two road 
games being at Nicholls and 
Southeastern. After hosting 
Stephen F. Austin in their next 
outing, the Demons will later 
host non-conference foe 
Centenary and then league 
opponents Southwest Texas 
and Nicholls to close out the 
home season. 



Six men selected to annual 
Lady Demon Sweetheart Court 



Six students have been 
selected to the first annual 
Lady Demon Sweetheart 
Court, chosen by members of 
the women's basketball team. 

Sweetheart Court members 
and their Lady Demon escorts 
are: Joe Bienvenu and Linda 
Grayson; Jonathan Shields 
and Sandy Pugh; John 
Stephens and Lonnie Banks; 
Felton Pay ton and Lisa Carter; 
Kevin Hays and Monica Lee; 



and John Cunningham and 
Teressa Thomas. 

The Court will be presented 
at half time of the men's 
basketball game on Thursday. 
The King will be announced at 
half time. 



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Vol. 73, No. 16 CURRENT SAUCE Feb. 1 2, 1 985 



PAGE 13 




Ladies end streak 
by beating Nicholls 



Heavy Dealing 

Skip Waters tries to trade Park Place for Lisa Williams' Pennsylvania Avenue in last 
week's Intramural Monopoly competition held in the Union lobby. In the foreground is 
Steve Allen. Lisa refused to sell or trade, but Skip won the game anyway. 



by John Cunningham 

Sports Editor 

The Lady Demons broke a 
two-game losing streak on 
Saturday night by beating up 
on the visiting Nicholls State 
Lady Colonels, 90-70. 

With the win, the Ladies 
climbed to 1 5-5, and have an 
undisputed Gulf Star lead at 5- 
0. 

Earlier in the week, the 
ladies lost twice in a row for 
the first time this season. On 
Monday night the NSU women 
fell to Grambling, 84-83, in a 
game played at GSU's small 
gym, which had 1 ,800 vocal 
fans crowded in for the game. 
Delta State of Mississippi 
handed NSU its second 
straight loss with a 91-87 win 




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LAST NIGHT'S SCORE: 

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over the Lady Demons in 
Prather. It was the second 
Coliseum loss this year for 
Northwestern. (The other loss 
was to number-four ranked 
Northeast.) 

For the Nicholls game, 
Teressa Thomas led all Lady 
Demon scorers with 19 
points. Annie Harris pumped 
in 16, and Gussie Leonard hit 
12, after sitting the bench 
because of foul trouble most 
of the first half. 

The Lady Colonels, who 
held second place in the GSC 
prior to the contest, were 
never in the game. The "NSU 
of the south" fell to 3-3 in loop 
play, 12-10 overall. 

At Grambling, several 
starters for NSU didn't see 
much action. Val Williams 
didn't even make the trip, and 
freshman sensation Gussie 
Leonard was sick, but still 
managed to put in 25 points 
for Northwestern 's losing 
cause. 

Leonard returned to form 
with 32 points and Linda 
Grayson added 1 9 against the 
Delta State women, but even 
those stellar performances 
couldn't offset foul trouble as 
the Mississippians shut 
Northwestern down in the last 
five minutes to take the lead 
for good. 



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PAGE 14 



Feb. 12,1985 CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73, No. T6 ' 



Four home games highlight "very tough" 1 985 



by John Ramsey 

Editor 

Games with three of the 
best in the Southland Con- 
ference and four of five Gulf 
Star Conference games on the 
road highlight what Tynes 
Hildebrand, athletic director, 
calls a "very tough" 1985 
football schedule. 

The Demons open the 
season at home on Aug. 31 
with powerful Arkansas State 
University providing the 



opposition. The Indians were 
8-3 last year and made it to 
the NCAA playoffs. 

Another Southland 
powerhouse the Demons will 
face is archrival Louisiana 
Tech - a team that advanced to 
the NCAA championship game 
in 1984. As always, the 
Bulldogs and the Demons will 
meet in the State Fair Classic, 
this year on Oct. 26. 

Another new team to the 
Demon schedule is North 
Texas State. The Mean Green 



DATE OPPONENT (Home games in capitals) TIME 

Aug 31 ARKANSAS STATE U. 7 p.m. 

Sept. 7 North Texas State 7p.m. 

Sept. 14 McNEESE STATE U. 7 p.m. 

Sept. 28 Southern Mississippi 6 p.m. 

Oct. 5 NORTHEAST LA U. (Homecoming) 7pm 

Oct. 1 9 Sam Houston 7 p.m. 

Oct. 26 Louisiana Tech (Shreveport) 7 p.m. 

Nov. 2 Southwest Texas 3 p.m. 

Nov. 9 Nicholls State 7:30 p.m. 

Nov. 1 6 Southeastern LA 7pm 

Nov. 23 STEPHEN F. AUSTIN STATE 7pm 



Gulf Star Conference standings: 



MEN'S BASKETBALL: 



Southeastern LA 
Stephen F. Austin 
Sam Houston 
Nicholls State 
NORTHWESTERN 
Southwest Texas 



5-0(14-7) 
3-0 (14-5) 
2-2 (12-9) 
2-3 (10-9) 
1-4 (2-20) 
1-6(5-16) 



WOMEN'S BASKETBALL: 



NORTHWESTERN 
Southeastern LA 
Nicholls State 
Sam Houston 
Southwest Texas 
Stephen F. Austin 



5-0(15-5) 

4-2 (12-9) 
3-3 (12-10) 

3-3(11-9) 
2-4(10-11) 

0-5(1-18) 



was 2-9 last season, but won 
the Southland title the year 
before. The Demons meet 
NTSU in Denton, TX, on Sept. 
7. 

After battling North Texas, 
old foe NcNeese State travels 
to Natchitoches on Sept. 14. 
The Cowboys from Lake 
Charles have escaped with 
narrow wins in each of their 
previous two meetings with 
the Demons. 

After an open date, the 
Demons will try to achieve 
"the impossible" again this 
year - defeat Southern 
Mississippi at Hattiesburg. 
Last season the Demons 
shocked the traditionally tough 
Golden Eagles at home, 22-0. 

Homecoming comes to 
Northwestern and Nat- 
chitoches on Oct. 5, when the 
Southland's third power, the 
Northeast Indians, invade 
Turpin Stadium. Two years 
ago Northwestern State 
University stunned then- 
number-nine ranked NLU, 13- 
9, in Turpin. Last year, the 
Demons shocked Northeast in 
Monroe's Malone Stadium, 
2/ - i Both years, the NSU 
wins cost the Indians top ten 
rankings and probably national 
playoff berths. 

GSC play begins on Oct. 1 9 
after another open date, when 
NSU travels to Huntsville, TX, 
to meet Sam Houston. The 
Bearkats were 8-3 last 
season, but in 1 984 lost 38-7 
to the Demons in Nat- 
chitoches. 

Tech provides the op- 
position in Shreveport the 
following weekend and on 
Nov. 2 the Demons return to 
Texas. San Marcos, to be 
exact. There the NSU team 
will face the Bobcats of 
Southwest Texas, another 
surprise victim of Nor- 
th western's 1984 GSC title 
march. 



THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO 

BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY. 

And they're both repre- 
sented by the insignia you wear 
as a member of the Army Nurse 
Corps. The caduceus on the left 
means you 're part of a health care 
system in which educational and 
career advancement are the rule, 
_ not the exception. The gold bar . 
on the right means you command respect as an Army officer, 
earning a BSN, write: Army Nurse Opportunities, P.O. Box 
Clifton, NJ 07015. 

ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE. 





If you re 
7713, 



Nicholls State, the school 
that tied NSU last year for the 
Gulf Star title, will host the 
Demons on Nov. 9 in 
Thibodaux. Two years ago, 
Northwestern began a 
season-salvaging winning 
streak of three games by 
downing the Colonels, 24-21 , 
on their home turf. 

For the second time in a 
row, this year's Northwestern 
squad will travel to Hammond 
to meet Southeastern LA in a 
GSC matchup. Last year the 



Demons manhandled the 
Lions, 38-21. 

To close the season again 
this year is NSU's rival in the 
Chief Caddo series, Stephen 
F. Austin. SFA has defeated 
NSU twice in two years - 25- 
22 in a 1983 game in Nat- 
chitoches and 22-1 8 in 1 984 
when the home-standing 
Lumberjacks cost the Demons 
the undisputed GSC cham- 
pionship. This year, the 
Demons will meet Stephen F. 
Austin in Turpin. 



Phi Mu 



Fundraiser 



9:00-2:00 
Tuesday, February 12 

Drink Specials — 



At The 
Student Body 



Test yourself. 

Which early pregnancy test is as 
easy to read as red, no -white, yes? 

Which is a simple one step test? 

Which has a dramatic color change 
to make the results unmistakable? 

Which is 98% accurate, as accurate 
as many hospital and lab tests? 

Which is portable for convenience 
and privacy? 




isnije jog noA 
•jil§u 9J,noA 



Vol. 73, No. T6 ' CURRENT SAUCE" ' Feb. 12,T983 



-I IflfA* 



15 



Viewpoint 



Nothing Like It! 



We're just one week away from Fat Tuesday, so 
here comes Demon Dictionary word number thirteen: 

Mardi Gras - a holiday established to celebrate 
the last days before lent begins. In south 
Louisiana it is hailed as the "biggest party in the 
world." In the northern half of the state, it's a 
good excuse to miss classes or work for a couple 
of days. 

When the New Orleans celebration of Mardi Gras 
began in 1 857, it was just one parade (Comus) and a 
few spectators. Since then, it has grown to its 
present day totals of 55 parades and annual crowds 
of over 1 million visitors. It is so big that one of the 
south's largest cities literally shuts down for three 
days. 

Most of Northwestern 's student body hails from the 
northern part of the state; therefore, many have 
never experienced all the fun and revelry that is 
Mardi Gras. That's a shame, since Mardi Gras is 
synonymous with Louisiana. Just like Cajuns and 
political corruption. 

If you've never been to New Orleans on Fat 
Tuesday, you've never experienced Louisiana at its 
best (and sometimes its worst!). Until then, your 
"education" is not complete. 

What makes Mardi Gras special? For each person, 
there's probably a different answer. Some like the 
wild partying, others the dazzling parades, still others 
the eccentric costumes and people. Whatever the 
reason, almost everyone who's been to Mardi Gras 
likes it. 

NSU students will feel right at home, for New 
Orleans at Mardi Gras is decorated in a tacky 
combination of purple, gold, and green - kind of like 
°ur tacky purple, white, and orange. New Orleans is 
noisy - kind of like Rapides. At Mardi Gras, everyone 
is feeling no pain - similar to Thursday nights at the 
Student Body. And if you veer off course near the 
^ench Quarter, the local housing projects look 
surprisingly similar to Kyser Hall. You'll feel right at 
home. 

There are some differences, too. The streets are 
Packed, unlike Prather Coliseum on basketball 
n| ghts. But that's another story altogether. 

recommendations for Mardi Gras include the 
Par ades of Endymion, REX, Zulu, and Comus. If you 
War >t to catch lots of interesting junk, try the Argus 
an d truck parades in Metairie. 



on 



|| you want to have a good time this weekend, New 
e ans is without a doubt your best bet. 
laissez les bons temps rouler 
. L Let the Good Times Roll! 

Joh " Ramsey 

editor 



Doonesbury by garry trudeau 



MIKE, HAVE YOU OUT' 
TALKEPTOYOUR (Cn'oF 
ATTACXER5 MOTHER fkft.1 

j— I \ yet? i 




C'M0N,MIKE,6IMME 

SOMETHING! WHAT (v/fl 

IUEREYOUUKEAS , ' 

/ A KIP? I 




til 



PO YOU OWN MO, BUT IF 
AHANP6UN, YOU PEOPLE 
MIKE? _ DONTSTAYOUT 
OF MY HOUSE, 
/|§y^ m SERIOUSLY 
^SS&.m JWMKIN60F 
GETTING ONE' 






Distraught 
Dodo? none 

i borest>*°* 
I Wish det»» 



Professionalism 



Isn't that why we're here? 

PROFESSIONALISM. Isn't that why we're here? To learn to 
be professionals in whatever field we choose. I am an ac- 
counting major in the College of Business, and I honestly enjoy 
my classes here. In my three years at Northwestern I have 
taken or am currently taking accounting classes (taught by a 
Certified Public Accountant), business law classes (taught by 
lawyers), and a stock class (taught by an ex-stock broker). 
That's why I'm here. To be taught professionalism in my chosen 
field by professionals. 

I am also one of the students frowned on in last week's 
editorial by Lisa Williams. I do indeed take a class at Fort Polk, 
where I signed up for a class in management. Webster's 
defines management as "the judicious use of means to ac- 
complish an end." This is precisely what we did at our last class 
meeting at Fort Polk. We were broken into groups, presented 
with a problem, and told to define the problem and form a 
solution using the data provided. This is my opinion of what a 
management class is, not writing papers and reading Woman's 
Weekly, like I would have to do in the same class on the Nat- 
chitoches campus. 

I prefer to use "means to accomplish and end" at Fort Polk, 
and to to learn management in the best way possible. 
Stacy Scroggins 

Business Manager 



Fill This Space 

BY WRITING A LETTER TO THE EDITOR. 
P.O. BOX 5306 OR DROP BY OFFICE, 
225A KYSER HALL. 



The 
Current Sauce 
Staff 



John Ramsey 

Editor 

Lisa Williams 

Managing Editor 

John Cunningham 

Sports Editor 

Lance Ellis 
Robin Gunter 
Kevin Hopkins 
Ricky Moore 

Staff Writers 

Warren Tape 

Art/Photography Editor 

Kevin Hopkins 

Photographer 

Stacy Scroggins 

Business Manager 

Lucy LeBlanc 

Advertising Director 

David Silver 
Carol Wegley 

Advertising Sales 

Russel Bienvenu 

Circulation/Distribution 

Peter Minder 

Adviser 

The Current Sauce 
newsmagazine is published 
weekly by students of 
Northwestern State 
University of Louisiana. It is 
student-run and financed, 
and is not associated with 
any of the University's 
colleges or departments. 

Editorial and business 
offices are located at Kyser 
Hall 225A. Office hours are 
1-4:30 p.m. Tuesday through 
Friday. The telephone 
number is (318) 357-5456. 
An answering machine will 
record messages after office 
hours. 

All correspondence is 
welcome, and should be 
brought by the office or 
mailed to P.O. Box 5306, 
University Station, Nat- 
chitoches, LA 71497. 

Deadline for both ad- 
vertising and copy is 1 p.m. 
on the Thursday preceding 
Tuesday publication. All 
contributed items must be 
signed and must include a 
telephone number. Names 
will be withheld upon 
request. 

Mail subscription rates are 
$6.00 for semester or 
$10.50 per academic year. 
Current Sauce is entered as 
second class mail in Nat- 
chitoches, LA. USPS number 
140-660. 



PACE 16 



Vol. 73, No. 16 CURRENT SAUCE Feb. 12, 1985 



The Wesley Foundation's second annual 
Valentine's Dinner and movie will be Thursday 
evening, beginning at 5:30 p.m. The cost is $3 
for steak, potato, salad, dessert and the movie. 

On Wednesday evening, Feb. 20, the Nor- 
thwestern Community is invited to share in the 
Wesley Chapel, Communion and an Ash Wed- 
nesday Service. 




There will be a carnation sale sponsored by the 
SAB on Tuesday and Wednesday, 1 a.m. until 2 
p.m. in the Union lobby. Carnations will be sold for 
one dollar, will be delivered on (Thursday) 
Valentine's Day. 



The A. A. Fredericks Center's Orville Hanchey 
Gallery is currently featuring the University of 
New Mexico Print Show through Friday. The 
gallery is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. 
to 4:30 p.m. Admission is free. 



Demon Connection, the annual high school 
visitation day, will be held on campus Thursday. 
Visiting students from a three-state area will be 
treated to many activities in most campus areas. 
For more information, call Enrollment 
Management at 357-5240. 



A weight control group will meet for ten 
Wednesdays this semester. The group is led by 
Dr. Millard Bienvenu of the University Counseling 
Center, and has already begun meeting. Call 
357-5901 for more information. 



Applications are now available for women 1 7- 
26 who have never been married to participate in 
the Miss Cenlabration pageant in Alexandria. 
This is a Miss America preliminary, and will be held 
on May 11. For an application, call 487-8791 . 



Applications are now available for students 
wishing to apply for Insider at the 1985 Inside 
View summer orientation program. Applications 
are available from Barbara Gillis in the Old Trade 
School, and must be turned in by Feb. 27. 

An exhibition of paintings and prints by Leslie 
Elliot is on display at the Hanchey Gallery of the 
A. A. Fredericks Center. Admission is free, and 
gallery hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays. 



Noteworthy 

Let us know what your 
group or organization is 
planning! Call the Sauce 
hotline 24 hours a day at 



357-5456 




Published articles and reviews by members of 
the University faculty are currently on display at 
the media and serials division of the Watson 
Library. 



A six-week course offering an introduction to 
sign language will begin Monday, Feb. 25, under 
the sponsorship of Continuing Education. 

The course is scheduled to meet on Mondays 
from 5 to 7 p.m. through April 8 in Kyser 207. The 
registration fee for adults and children 1 2 years of 
age and older will be $25 per person. For in _ 
formation, call 357-4579. 



It's Sweetheart Night at Prather Coliseum on 
Thursday when the Demons tackle Gulf Star-rival 
Stephen F. Austin. Game time is at 7:30. 



Loans, grants, and campus employment 

are available to students who plan to enroll for the 
summer term. 

A student must be enrolled for six hours or more 
to be eligible for federal student aid for the 
summer session. If you plan to attend summer 
school and are in need of financial aid, visit the 
financial aid office (Roy Hall) as soon as possible 
to talk with someone concerning these federal 
student aid programs. 



Epsilon-Upsilon chapter of Tau Kappa Epsilon 
fraternity recently elected officers for the up- 
coming year. 

Elected are Dennis Jeffares, president; Phil 
Vaughn, first vice-president; Greg Geier, second 
vice-president; Frank Sisson, treasurer; Chris 
Pearce, secretary; Jon Maynard, chaplin; John 
Lever, historian; Kent Mastanish, sergeant-at- 
arms and rush chairman; and Grady Norton, 
pledge trainer. 



Northwestern's chapter of the Association of 
the United States Army (AUSA) has been re- ' 
activated after 15 years of inactivity. The first"! 
meeting was held in December and the following^ 
officers were elected: 

Bill Doane, company commander; Brian Mar-*; 
shall, executive officer; David Silver, finance and* 
security officer; and Richard Fenoli, administration! 
NCO. 

AUSA is a military support agency designed to 
help the entire Army and to provide lobbyists toj 
congress. The local chapter is a service] 
organization dedicated to the improvement ofj 
military life. The newly formed chapter will DOT 
performing service projects to the entire Nat-; 
chitoches community. 



Reservations are now being accepted for a two- ) 
day tour of South Louisiana that is being, 
sponsored in March by Continuing Education. 

The tour, which is set for March 22-23, will-; 
include such highlights as visits to Nottaway 
Plantation, Longfellow-Evangeline State Park, the 
Acadian House Museum, St. Martin de Tours 
Church, Evangeline Oak, Heymann Oil Center, St. 
John's Cathedral, the Cathedral Oak, the 
Lafayette Museum and Acadian Village. 



Current Quotes 



How do you feei about the proposed cutbacks in federal student 
aid? 




Mario Jackson 

1-2, Elem. Education 

Mansfield 

"I feel we really can no\ 
afford a cutback because it is 
hard enough trying to make it 
now. If anything we should 
get a little more." 



Dr. LeRoi Eversull 
Professor, Geography 
Boyce 

"I would be against a cut- 
back in student loans because 
they are an investment in the 
future of our nation; however, 
I feel the students who don't 
pay them back should be 
prosecuted." 



Joe Parker 

3-2, Art Education 

Many 

"How can you expect 
anything but a cutback when 
you have approximately 30- 
40 percent of government 
student loans that are never 
repaid. It doesn't make sense 
for anyone to make loans if 
they'll never get paid back." 



Kathy Bonin 

1-2, Music Education 

Shreveport 

"I don't agree with it. It is 
hard enough as it is paying for 
college, but a cutback would 
only make it worse." 



Angela Row 

4-2, Public Relations 
Shreveport 

"They should not cut bacKj 
any government aid. But, trt*| 
University and others l oS ?j 
money because they dontj 
keep accurate records <T 
money going in and <"fl 
because of scholarships- 
Some students are makflfl 
money at registration." 



Current Sauce 



Northwestern State University 

of Louisiana 

Natchitoches, LA 

March 5, 1985 
Vol. 73, No. 17 



Lady Demons 
Win the Conference 



see page 12 






News 



Enrollment creeps upward again 



by Lance Ellis 

News Staff 

Enrollment for the spring 
semester is slightly higher 
than that of one year ago, and 
on all campuses totals 6,080, 
a .75 percent increase from 
the total of 6,033 in spring, 
1984. 

The enrollment always dips 
a little from the fall to spring 
semester, but this year the 
drop is unusually small, ac- 



cording to Dr. Ray K. 
Baumgardner, registrar. 

"There is usually a 10 
percent drop in enrollment 
from the fall semester to the 
spring semester," he said. 
Last fall Northwestern 
registered 6,178 students, 
while this semester the 
enrollment is 6,080. This is far 
below the usual 10 percent 
decline we experience each 
spring." 

"This also takes in to ac- 



count we had about 400 
graduates in the fall, so it does 
give us reason to feel proud 
that Northwestern State 
University is showing signs of 
growth, even if it is ever so 
slowly," he said. 

Main campus enrollment at 
Natchitoches is 3,269, while 
the remaining 2,81 1 students 
attend class at one of the 
branch campuses: Shreveport 
(724), Fort Polk (942), 
England Air Force 



Spring Enrollment Figures 



SCHOOL 


SPRING 




Delgado 


8,396 


8,006 


Grambling State 


4,677 


4,676 


Louisiana Tech 


10,449 


10,825 


McNeese 


7,600 


7,910 


Nicholls State 


7,203 


7,387 


Northeast 


10,796 


11,558 


NORTHWESTERN 


6,080 


6,178 


Southeastern 


8,346 


8,992 


Southwestern (USL) 


15,560 


16,326 


TOTALS 


79,107 


81,949 



Institutions under the control of the Board of Trustees. 



FALL-SPRING CHANGE 
plus-4.8 percent 
-1 .9 percent 
-3.5 percent 
-4.0 percent 
-2.5 percent 
-6.6 percent 
-1 .6 percent 
-7.2 percent 
-4.7 percent 



-2.72 percent 



Base/Alexandria (355), other 
(790). 

Enrollment by college is Arts 
and Sciences, 264; Basic 
Studies and Associate 
Programs, 2,611; Business 
and Applied Sciences, 505; 
Education and Behavioral 
Sciences, 318; Graduate 
Studies and Research, 1 ,648; 
and Nursing, 734. 

Freshmen contribute 1,934 
students toward the student 
body, while the sophomore 
class enrolls 888. Juniors 
number 638, and there are 
972 seniors. Graduate 
students and individuals taking 
classes but not pursuing a 
degree constitute the rest of 
the enrollment. 

The vast majority of Nor- 
thwestern students - 5,604 - 
are residents of Louisiana. 
Residents of other states 
number 297, while there are 
1 79 foreign students 
currently registered. 

And as usual, the women 
outnumber the men at NSU by 
a wide margin; 3,628 females 
and 2,452 male students. 



SAB spring concert still unclear 



by Ricky Moore 

Staff Writer 

Jimmy Hartline, chairman of 
the concert committee of the 
Student Activities Board, 
doesn't know whether Nor- 
thwestern is going to have a 
spring concert this year or not. 
He said that it "all depends" 
and that "nowhere does it 
state that we have to have a 
spring concert." 

Hartline said there were 
several groups brought up for 
consideration at their last 
committee meeting. They 
were Banana-rama. Tommy 
Shaw (of Styx), New Edition, 
and Sawyer Brown. They 
were all voted down. "A lot 
were eliminated because of 
price" he said, adding that 
there is probably not enough 
money left in the budget for a 
spring concert now. 

The total budget for the 
Concert Committee for this 
year is $1 8,500. Because the 
Louise Mandrell concert cost 
$1 1 ,000 ($1 8,000 total cost 
minus $7,000 ticket sales) 
and an upcoming spring mini- 
concert will cost $2,000, 
see "Concert..." 
on page 5 




Heavy Dealing 

Stephanie Samuels, Student Activities Board president, talks on the phone with a 
national concert representative. The SAB is still unsure if NSU will host a spring concert, 
as losses on the Louise Mandrell concert were high. 



Current Sauce 



March 5, 1985 
Vol. 73, No. 17 



On the Cover 

Our cover shot shows 
Lady Demon Linda Grayson 
adding two points for NSU 
as the Lady Demons crush 
Stephen F. Austin to finish 
10-0 in the Gulf Star 
Conference and 20-6 for 
the year. Also pictured is 
the team, hamming it up 
with the GSC title plaque. 

Turn to page twelve for 
John Cunningham's ac- 
count of both of last week's 
battles against the 
Ladyjacks - two wins which 
may send Northwestern 
into the NCAA playoffs for 
the first time ever. 



Rumors. You hear a lot 
of them in Natchitoches. 
How are they hurting, and 
who are they hurting? See 
page fifteen for an editorial 
perspective. 

NSU has some of the 
most interesting ar- 
chitecture of any campus 
in the state. Photographer 
Warren Tape spent a 
couple of hours last week 
snapping away at several of 
Northwestern's buildings, 
and he found some striking 
contrasts. 

See page eight for the 
photo essay. 



A unique elementary/pre- 
school, called Alpha, is 
currently operating on 
campus. Meet the people 
behind this fascinating 
program - a one of a kind in 
north Louisiana. 

SGA elections are rolling 
around again, and students 
on next Wednesday will 
have four major proposals 
to vote for. See page four 
for further details. 



How do you feel about 
the indictment of 

Louisiana's governor? Five 
students voice their views 
for Current Quotes on page 
thirteen. 

Wayne Yates resigned 
on Friday as head 
basketball coach for NSU. 
See page 1 1 for details. 



Letters to the Editor 
poured into the Sauce 
office. Due to space 
limitations, only three were 
printed, but they sure are 
interesting. See paQ e 
fourteen. 



Please 

Direct, 

d ays a 
you r n 

Direct, 



Vol. 73, No. 17 CURRENT SAUCF March 5, 1985 



PAGE \ 



Orze to faculty: The slate is wiped clean 



by John Ramsey 

Editor 

president Orze told 
University employees last 
week that "the slate was 



wiped clean," but that the next 
time he heard rumors about 
his dismissal, something will 
be done about it. 

"I tell you adamantly and 
strongly. The next time I hear 



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it, or the next time I have 
proof, something will be done - 
in a legal, straightforward 
manner." 

During most of last Mon- 
day's thirty-five minute ad- 
dress, the president appealed 
for the faculty and staff to get 
behind the institution and 
forget the events of the past 
three weeks. 

"The hurt that I felt was so 
much more than the comfort 
that comes with any 'win' I 
may have gotten," he said. "I 
really felt bad for Nor- 
thwestern. The institution 
suffered the most. But now we 
have to get together; to make 
it work. We've found it's easier 
to work together." 

"If you (faculty and staff) 
want to make Northwestern 
the best it can be, we will all 
benefit. If you can't believe in 
it, you can't be a part of it," he 
said. 

Orze said that any problems 
associated with Northwestern 
are not ones that appeared 
overnight, and neither will the 
solutions come overnight. He 
said that as the president, he 
would not always be agreed 



with on tough decisions. But 
they must be made for the 
betterment of the University, 
despite any "toes that are 
stepped on." 

"If I had the choice between 
being popular and respected, 
I'll take the respect. Sure, 
everybody wants to be 
popular. God knows it's hard 
being lonely. But it's important 
to know that you've done your 
best with the power you 
have," he said. 

Orze added "everything I've 
done has been in the best 
interst of Northwestern State 

"The institution suffered the 
most. But now we have to 
get together; to make it 
work." 

President 
Joseph J. Orze 

University, and it hasn't always 
been popular." 

Midway through the 
assembly, Orze turned his 
attention to another pressing 
problem: the 2.5 percent 
budget cuts ordered by 
Governor Edwards last month, 



The 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 
ASSOCIATION 



of 

Northwestern State University 



request the pleasure of your 
company 
at an 



Open House 



Tuesday and Wednesday, 
March 5th and 6th, 1985 
1 1 :00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. 

SGA Office 
Second Floor, Student Union 
Refreshments will be served 



which affect all state- 
supported institutions. Orze 
said that unlike faculty . and 
staff at some other colleges 
and universities, NSU per- 
sonnel are safe. 

"Nothing will be done to 
affect our personnel." he said. 
"There will be no salary cuts, 
layoffs or firings. We'll meet 
our financial problems. We've 
got good financial 
management. 

The president said that 
when the budget was planned, 
the administration hoped to 
have faculty and staff raises 
by the end of the year. 
Despite the budget cuts, he 
said, raises are planned for 
next year's budget. 

Orze also told the group of 
approximately 400 staff 
members that all state 
university presidents are 
working together to get the 
state legislature to fund higher 
education, as close to 100 
percent as possible. 

"If we had it (funding), then 
we could develop and im- 
plement a salary enhancement 
program to allow us to 
compete for qualified faculty in 
the academic market. We 
could increase our library and 
have a large percentage of 
money go toward instruction. 
And we could reach our 
highest potential for academic 
progress; we could be the 
pinnacles of excellence.'' 

Orze used the cigarette-ad 
slogan "we've come a long 
way, baby" to describe NSU 
since he took over as 
president on June 1, 1982. 
He cited several examples of 
progress since that time. 

To close the meeting, Orze 
said that the faculty can "fill 
this place with students, but 
we nave to go out and tell 
eveyone what's good about 
Northwestern," instead of the 
negative concept they may 
have because of recent media 
coverage. 

"Perception is reality. As 
people perceive us, that's how 
they think we are. So we had 
better believe in ourselves and 
shout our strengths," Orze 
said. 

"If we believe in ourselves, 
then other people can believe 
it too," said Orze. 



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March 5, 1 985 CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73, No. 1 7 



Student elections set for next Wednesday 



Next Wednesday, students 
will not only pull levers for SGA 
officers and senators-at-large, 
but will also pull levers for or 
against four separate 
proposals. 

The four issues at stake are 
the Potpourri fee increase, the 
Student Trust Fund, the Ski 
Team renewal, and the ap- 
proval of a new SGA con- 
stitution The fifth proposal, 
the subject of adding part-time 
students to the current 
student assessments, will be 
voted on March 20, the run- 
off date. 

This wili be the first time 
since 1983 that student fee 
proposals have been offered 
to students 

Following is a brief summary 
of each bill to be voted on next 
week 

THE STUDENT TRUST FUND 
BILL .was proposed by senator 
Rhonda Leydecker. This trill 
would add a $5 assessment to 
student fees. A committae 
would be formed to oversee 
the usage of the fund, whch 
could only be used for student 
projects which NSU can not or 
will not fund. Leydecker cites 
an example. "suppose a 




student wanted to see 
racquctball courts con- 
structed He could go befor<v 
the committee, and then they 
would vote on it. Only 
students could decide what to 
do with the money " 

She added that it could be 
used for such major projects, 
or for anything that just 
"needs fixing 

A FEE INCREASE FOR 
POTPOURRI was authored by 
senator Eileen Haynes Her 
bill stated that since printing 
and labor costs have risen 
dramatically snce the last 
yearbook fee increase, the 
book deserves a $5 addition 
to its assessment, which 
would bring the total from $ 1 5 
to $20 in the fall semesters 
only. Students would still not 
pay any spring assessment for 
the Potpourri. 

THE RENEWAL OF SKI TEAM 
FEES is set to come up this 
year, as it is now two years 
since the bill's original ap- 
proval Currently, students 
pay $1 per semester for ski 
team funding. If the renewal 
passes, the team will continue 
to receive student funds. 

STUDENT APPROVAL OF A 



NEW SGA CONSTITUTION 

must also be voted on. The 
new constitution, according to 
Tod Klotzbach, SGA 
president, is simply a newer 
version of the old one, with the 
loopholes being tightened. 
"There are really no major 
changes," he said. 

STUDENT FEES FOR PART- 
TIME STUDENTS will come up 
on the ballot on March 20. 
Currently, Northwestern is the 



only school in the state where 
only full-time students pay 
fees. The proposal was 
passed unanimously by the 
SGA Finance Committee, 
chaired by Jon Robbins, SGA 
treasurer. Says Robbins, "this 
will let part-time students 
share the burden. They won't 
pay for anything they don't 
use." 

The plan is simply to let part- 
time students pay for student 
services which they receive, 



such as Current Sauce, 
KNWD. Argus, the Union 
drama and program fees, the 
Recreation Complex, etc. If 
approved, part-time students 
(5-1 1 hours) will not pay for 
Potpourri, SGA, intramurals, 
rodeo team, or ski team. 

If passed, the Recreation 
Complex fee for full-time 
students will be decreased in 
the fall and spring, and in- 
creased in the summer, when 
the complex is open most of 



the time. "We found that the 
complex just isn't open 
enough in the regular 
semesters to warrant paying 
the same as in the summer 
when it's open every day." J 

If passed, the Rec. Complex 
adjustment is the only effect 
the bill will have on full-time 
students; it will not raise 
current fees. 

Next week's elections wi 
be held from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m 
in the Union lobby. 



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Vol. 73, No. 17 CURRENT SAUCE March 5, 1985 



PAGE S 



Concert still up in air, says SAB 



continued from 
page 2 

there is only $5,500 left for a 
spring concert now. Hartline 
said that wouldn't begin to 
cover the cost of a major 
concert. 

When asked why some of 
the more popular groups didn't 
come to Northwestern, 
Stephanie Samuels, president 
Df the SAB, said, "Money is it; 
that's the key." She added 



that any Top 40 group was 
going to cost at least 
$35,000. Samuels also said 
that Prather Coliseum is 
another limiting factor; it only 
holds 5,000 people. The lack 
of freeways is another 
problem; no one will drive very 
far to see a concert at Nor- 
thwestern. 

Samuels said the biggest 
problem is that students don't 
support the concerts. She 



said that's "the reasoning 
behind having a concert during 
the Christmas festival... 
you've got 1 00,000 people in 
town that day. Surely some of 
those people would come to a 
concert." 

Samuels said that only about 
20 percent of the crowd at 
any concert at Northwestern 
is made up of students. Of the 
1 200 people at the Louise 
Mandrell concert there were 



only approximately 240 
students. It cost the SAB 
$1 1,000 so that 240 
students could attend a 
concert. 

Samuels emphasized that 
this figure of 20 percent held 
for all the recent concerts, 
including the Commodores, 
Evelyn King and her backup 
The Dazz Band, the SOS 
Band, and all the others that 
she remembered. She said, 




1892. HOWARD HANSELBERGERDORFER 
INVENTS THE HEADLIGHT 




And, boyoh-boy, was old 
Howard beaming when he 
came up with that. 

You '11 be beaming, 
too, after you taste 
Bud Light. It's the 
less-hllmg light beer 
with the first name m 
taste. (Good thing its 
first name isn't 
Hanselbergerdorfer.) 



So, like Howard, bring 
out your best Beam 
yourself to your favonte 
tavern and ask for the great 
light of today. Bud Light. 



EVERYTHING 

ELSEISJUST 

ALIGHT 



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"No one supports the con- 
certs. What do you' do?" In the 
last 20 years only two con- 
certs have made money, 
LeRoux and Ronnie Milsap, 
she added. "You can never 
satisfy everybody. Student 
apathy is the biggest problem 
facing any activity on this 
campus." 

Hartline said, "I think the 
students are really apathetic. 
I've busted my butt for them." 
He said that he wished that he 
could "get the people who use 
all their energy complaining to 
put that energy into trying to 
help make some decisions." 
He said that anyone could 
come to the concert com- 
mittee meetings. 

When asked why Louisiana 
Tech has such good concerts, 
Hartline said, "Tech has such 
concerts because they have 
god freeways, they have 
10,000 student and they 
have a concert budget of 
$55,000." 



Saints 
affect 
state 



Each person in Louisiana 
will suffer if New Orleans loses 
the Saints professional 
'ootball team, which would 
mean a loss of nearly $133 
million annually, said Noelle 
LeBlanc, secretary of the 
Department of Culture, 
Recreation and Tourism, last 
week. 

She said that this is not a 
situation that affects only New 
Orleans. The Saints and the 
Louisiana Superdome attract 
visitors who stay in hotels and 
pay the occupancy tax. They 
eat in restaurants and shop in 
stores where they pay state 
as well as local sales taxes. 

"At least $6 million in direct 
state tax revenue would be 
lost each year - money that 
provides the people of this 
state with such things as 
health care, roads and 
education," said LeBlanc. 

"I'm appalled that Louisiana 
is going to sit back and lose 
the Saints," she said. "We 
have to sell Louisiana. Each 
time we lose an attraction we 
lose some of our marketability. 
We can't sell Louisiana if we 
don't keep it worth buying. 
And if tourists don't buy, 
everyone in Louisiana suf- 
fers." 

Nearly one dozen cities are 

see "Saints" 
on page 6 



PACE 6 



March 5, 1985 CURRENT SAUCE Vol.73, No. 17 



SAB members attend convention in Chicago 



Eight members of the 
Student Activities Board 
returned last Monday from a 
seven-day trip to Chicago 
where they attended the 
annual convention of the 
National Association of 
Campus Activities. 

According to Rita Ravare, 
first vice-president, the 
purpose of the trip was to "get 
entertainment for Nor- 
thwestern at a cheaper cost 
through co-op buying.'' With 
the cooperative buying 
process, entertainers may be 
booked at progressively lower 
prices if more schools in the 
area get together and 
negotiate performance dates. 

SAB members had an 
opDortunity to view many 
entertainers in the evenings at 
the showcase performances. 



Saints 



continued from 
page 5 

planning or considering 
construction of domed 
stadiums for major sports 
teams to bring the prestige 
and millions of tourist dollars to 
their cities. "If we don't do 
something to keep the Saints 
in New Orleans some other 
city will get them. We will lose 
our visitors to some other 
state," warned LeBlanc. 

The Saints and the 
Superdome have helped to 
revitalize downtown New 
Orleans. Since 1975 the 
number of hotel rooms has 
nearly tripled. Businesses 
have moved into the area 
bringing jobs and money and 
increasing the state's income 
and sales tax revenues. 

"Time is running out. If 
Louisiana loses the Saints we 
will lose a lot more than just a 
football team," stressed 
LeBlanc. "It's not a matter of 
losing a team but of losing an 
industry." 



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Comedian Alex Cole, 
scheduled to appear March 
1 5 as part of the Midterm Blitz 
activities, was one of the acts 
booked at the NACA Con- 
vention. 

Other performers selected 
for next fall include a return 
visit by comedian Chip 
Franklin on Oct. 4; Gravity's 
Last Stand, a juggling act set 
for Sept. 14; coffeehouse 
entertainer Barbara Bailey 
Hutchison, also a return 



performer, scheduled for Oct. 
22; Hot Shandy, a cof- 
feehouse group making a 
return visit on Oct. 2, and 
singer Dave Wopat, brother to 
Tom Wopat of Dukes of 
Hazzard fame, set for Nov. 
22. 

A modern dance company, 
Bulova, has been scheduled 
for sometime in November, 
Ravare said. 

Northwestern also will 
receive a free comedy 



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showcase as a result of a 
raffle sponsored by Miller 
Beer during the convention. 

In additon to viewing per- 
formers and participating in 
co-operative buying sessions, 
the members attended 
educational sessions during 
the day. Ravare said that some 
of the sessions dealt with 
problems facing student 
activities groups all over the 
country - recruiting new 
members, retaining the 



members, programming for 
minorities, negotiating con- 
tracts and understanding 
copyrights. 

Ravare said that overall the 
trip was very successful, 
despite the long and tiring trip 
on a crowded van. "We spend 
a lot of money to get these 
entertainers for the students 
and it is for their benefit. I 
really hope they will take 
advantage of these op- 
portunities," she said. 



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Vol.73, No. 17 CURRENT SAUCE March 5, 1985 



PAGE 7 



Second Renaissance Festival begins Monday 



The second annual Nor- 
thwest Louisiana Medieval- 
Renaissance Festival will be 
conducted on campus 
beginning Monday. 

The week-long celebration 
will feature movies, seminars, 
exhibits, videotape presen- 
tations and discussions. The 
highlight of the festival will be 
the Medieval-Renaissance 
Fair Thursday, Friday and 



Saturday, on the grounds of 
the Old President's Home on 
College Avenue. 

Joseph A. Johnson, 
associate professor of 
English, who is directing the 
festival and fair, said the 
festival is unique in that it is 
produced by individuals from 
the city and from the 
university. 

Johnson said the festival 




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and fair will focus on "the 
glories of Arthur's Camelot, its 
valiant knights of the round 
table and beautiful maidens of 
castles high, and the ex- 
citement of Elizabeth's 
England, its disdainful ladies 
and love-sick fops... together 
with jugglers, dancers, 
musicians, players, sword- 
smen, wrestlers, wenches, 
pendants, ports, cony- 
catchers, clerics, danbers. 
gulls, bawds and fools. "He 
also encourages those 
planning to attend to dress in 
costume. 

"During the three-day fair, 
which was successful last 
year, there will be booths 
selling food and drink, tents 
offering games of skill and 
chance, peddlers pushing 
trinkets and cloths, poets and 
painters seeking patrons, 
troubadors and goliards and 
fools emphasizing human 
follies and vanities," Johnson 
stated. 

He said the Medieval- 
Renaissance Fair at Nor- 
thwestern is based upon 
actual historical fairs and upon 
the re-creations that have 
been extremely popular in 
Texas, California, Connecticut 
and Florida. 

On Friday and Saturday of 
next week, members of the 
Society for Creative 
Anachronisms, an organization 
of medieval enthusiasts, will 
present mock tournaments 
and jousts, displays of armor, 
shows of magic and rounds of 
dancing. 

Johnson said members of 
the society will be available to 
talk with individuals interested 
in the Middle Ages and in 
starting a local chapter of the 
society. 



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the Medieval-Renaissance 
Fair, members of the Society 
for Creative Anachronisms, an 
organization of medieval 
enthusiasts, will present mock 
tournaments and jousts, 
displays of armor, shows of 
magic and rounds of dancing. 

Johnson said members of 
the society will be available to 
talk with individuals interested 
in the Middle Ages and in 



starting a local chapter of the 
society. 

"Last year was a success, 
especially the fencing mat- 
ches, the dunkings, the belly- 
dancing and the installing of 
the Lord of Misrule, the fool 
empowered to play pranks on 
the pompous and to dismiss 
students from class.'' stated 
Johnson. 

For further information on 
the Festival and Fair call 357- 
6608. 




Two-Alarm Blaze 

On Thursday at 3:15, a two-alarm fire broke out in the 
basement of the Rapides dormitory. Natchitoches 
firefighters extinguished the blaze quickly, and little damage 
was done to the building itseif. 

(Photo by Dennis Wilson) 



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Vol. 73, No. 1 7 CURRENT SAUCE March 5, 1 985 



PAGE 9 




Gifted Children 

Two of the children involved in the Alpha program at NSU experiment with art. Alpha is 
an accelerated pre-elementary program. 

Wyatt to head yearbook staff 



by Robin Gunter 

News Staff 

Patrick Wyatt has been 
selected to serve as editor-in- 
chief of the 1 986 Potpourri. 

Wyatt was chosen at last 
Tuesday's meeting of the 
Student Media Board, who 
"let to review applications and 
interview interested students. 
Other students under con- 
sideration were Lucy LeBlanc 
and Kristine Leone. 

Wyatt is a journalism major 
^d commutes daily from 
Marthaville, where he was 
^itor of his high school 
yearbook. 

He feels that being editor 
give him valuable 
fi ducational training and 
experience, and that he has 
already learned enough to 



produce a high-quality 
yearbook that can serve NSU 
well. 

"I realize that this job will 
require extensive coverage of 
events," he said. "I will en- 
thusiastically devote my time 
to the coverage of these 
events, knowing that some of 
the most important events 
occur on weekends." 

Wyatt added that the 1 986 
Potpourri will be different from 
those of years past, since he 
will utilize new concepts that 
he is learning in Northwestern 
journalism courses. 

A good yearbook requires 
strong thematic and sectional 
development, said Wyatt. He 
added that every campus 
organization will get fair 



coverage under his editorship. 

"I'll try to be a good editor, 
concerned with the writing, 
photo coverage, display, 
business, staff organization, 
morale and most importantly, 
the content of the book," he 
said. 

Applications for Potpourri 
staff positions will be ac- 
cepted for one week. Ap- 
plications may be picked up 
and returned by noon 
Wednesday, March 6, 1986, 
from Mr. Minder in Kyser 225 
F. The Potpourri is seeking 
staff members who have 
journalistic skills in 
photography, writing, layout 
design, proofreading, copy 
editing, graphic arts and 
design art. 



Not your everyday 
Kind of school 



VISION, 



by Robin Gunter 

News Staff 

It doesn't look much like a 
first grade classroom. No 
desks in a row, textbooks, 
worksheets, blackboard, not 
even a teacher's desk. 

The young students, ages 
3-6, are busily making 'space 
pizza,' and are guided by 
teacher Corliss McCallister - 
helping one student with 
motor skills as he rolls out the 
dough, and asking another 
how many pieces of pep- 
peroni she will need to 
represent the planets and 
checking yet another's math 
as he tries to decide if he will 
have enough slices for 
everyone if he cuts each half 
into thirds. 

This is a typical learning 
session at Alpha, an ex- 
perimental school for 
preschoolers and first-grade 
students. 

Alpha (Accelerated 
Laboratory for Pupils of High 
Ability), the only school 
program of its kind in north and 
central Louisiana, began when 
NSU and the Natchitoches 
Parish School Board agreed to 
cooperate to serve ten 
children who had been 
identified by the parish as 
having "high potential." 

Under the leadership of Dr. 
Frederick Gies, dean of the 
College of Education and 
Behavioral Sciences; Dr. 
Robert Oge, principal of the 
NSU Lab School; and George 
Lewis, director of special 
education for Natchitoches 
Parish Schools, Alpha was 
charged with serving 
Louisiana's bright young 
students and discovering new 
ways of making learning 



exciting and important to all. 

Located on the first floor of 
South Hall on campus, Alpha 
students study reading, math, 
science, social studies, art, 
music, movement, dramatics, 
computers and Spanish. 

This month they are 
studying space and the five 
rooms (movement room, 
language room, art room, 
kitchen and science room) are 
filled with globes, lunar maps, 
photograph's of Jupiter's 
moons, books and computer 
software on space ex- 
plorations. Charts illustrating 
the placement of heavenly 
bodies are made from various 
odds and ends. Next month, 
the students have decided to 
study dinosaurs. 

Gies wanted a research- 
oriented program to find new 
ways to do the "same old 
thing" - to challenge students 
and help them learn. Alpha 
was created to combine two 
goals - experimentation and 
service. 

"Like the first Greek letter, 
Alpha is a first - a new 
beginning, a sort of fresh 
ideas," said McCallister. 



FRIDAY 
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to 

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Featuring Leon Wilkeson 

and Billy Powell 
Surviving Members Of The 
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Appearing Friday, March 8, 1 985 
at 7:30 p.m. 
at the Pineville High School 
Auditorium in Pineville, LA. 

Tickets are $ 5 50 in Advance 

$ 6 50 Day of Concert 
For Sale at University Sounds 

in Natchitoches. 
Special Guest is AIRBORNE 



THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO 
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY. 

And they're both repre- 
sented by the insignia you wear 
as a member of the Army Nurse 
Corps. The caduceus on the left 
means you're part of a health care 
system in which educational and 
career advancement are the rule, 
_ not the exception. The gold bar . 
on the right means you command respect as an Army officer, 
earning a BSN, write: Army Nurse* Opportunities, P.O. Box 
Clifton, NJ 07015. 





If you're 
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ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE, 



March 5, 1 985 CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73, No. 1 7 



10 



Close-Up 



USA ON- 
CAMPUS 



Wisconsin tries to cut alcohol abuse 





To reduce alcohol abuse on campus, 
researchers at the University of Wisconsin- 
Madison suggest that colleges may do well to 
sponsor more participatory events on campus. 

Researchers Frank- Farley and Sharon 
McNeely found what they call Type T per- 
sonalities: people with an inner thrill-seeking 
need who correlate highly with alcohol abuse, 
especially drinking and driving. 

Rechanneling their efforts to find 
psycological stimuli in more constructive ac- 
tivities is an important step in cutting down their 
alcohol consumption, says Farley. The key, 
however, is to involve them in activities and 
events designed to satisfy their need for 
arousal. 

"You probably can't change the core per- 
sonality," Farley says. "If you think of it (thrill- 
seeking) as a lifestyle, then you can work 
toward changing it. We (as a society) have had 
a lot of experience lately in how to change our 
lifestyles." 

He points out that in recent years studies 
have taught us that certain personality types 
and lifestyles often have life-threatening 
consequences, such as stress, heart failure 
and cancer. The same research has not been 
done for the leading killer of young adults: 
drunk driving. 

The current approach to the problem of 
alcohol abuse has been legalistic. The trouble 
is that, for Type T people, higher drinking ages, 
higher driving ages, and harsher penalities for 
offenders may have the reverse of the intended 
effect. The danger of breaking these laws, and 
even the novelty of going to jail, may be just the 
thrill these people are looking for. 



"I'm working toward a reorientation of our 
attention," says Farley. "We need to identify 
these people: Who are they? What are their 
characteristics? And how can we help them?" 

Progress has already been made. Farley has 
found that the thrill of sports, especially body- 
contact sports, is a very satisfying outlet for 
Type T personalities. But he has also found that 
"T" types are especially creative people and 
that crafts, arts, and music often fulfill their 
need for stimulation. 

They are also very social people and Farley 
suspects that preventative counseling - 
showing them that their alcohol abuse may kill 
their friends, family and loved ones - the survey 
finds, have twice as many automobile ac- 
cidents as other personality types. 

A theme that seemed to emerge from our 
study was that drinking was a scheduled event, 
a part of the cultural and campus clock in which 
'going drinking' was a regular activity in itself 
and part of the tempo of student life," says 
Farley. Breaking the routines, changing the 
lifestyles, won't be easy, he admits, especially 
since it appears to hinge on increased school 
involvment. Type T personalities need to be 
identified and counseled. Parents need to be 
alerted. And most importantly, stimulating 
alternatives to alcohol-induced arousel need to 
be provided. 

To this end, Farley surveyed 500 students to 
find what they would prefer as alternatives to 
drinking. Females preferred dances, plays and 
movies; males preferred sports and sex. 
Well... there are limits even to school in- 
volvement. 



Frat closure upsets students 



Relations are strained between ad- 
ministrators and students at Illinois Wesleyan 
University because students feel officials there 
turned a deaf ear to student protests over the 
withdrawal of university recognition for a 
fraternity. 

Describing the IWU administration as "ultra- 
conservative," student government leaders are 
complaining that the Acacia fraternity was 
closed by officials because its members "didn't 
fit the mold." 

"They were more individualistic," says Lisa 
Gosker, treasurer of the IWU student govern- 
ment. "When we asked why (recognition was 
withdrawn) we got different reasons." 

Dean of Students Glenn Switchtenberg says 
the administration "withdrew recognition in the 
hope that it (the fraternity) can be started up 
again, say, in a couple of years. There were a 
number of problems which existed over several 
years: alcohol problems, but these were really 
minor: image: and low membership. 

"There was an alcohol violation." Gosker 
says, "but it was nothing compared to the 
violations of other fraternities here. Low 
membership: there were only 1 6 members, but 
this is a very small university. And poor image? 
We thought these were very subjective 
reasons." 



Calling the administration "totalitarian," 
students are also complaining that the Student 
Senate's efforts to intervene on behalf of the 
fraternity were treated with arrogance. "We got 
nowhere with the administration," says Gosker. 
"The dean said, 'You shouldn't question the 
administration's decisions.'" 

The fraternity closure brought out "the most 
student activism this university's seen in 
years," according to Gosker. She says 
students held a rally, wrote letters to the editor 
in the student newspaper and wore black 
armbands to university sporting events, all in 
support of Acacia. The administration was 
"surprised" by the depth of student support, 
says Gosker, but stood firm in its decision. 

The student government admits defeat in this 
battle but is planning future strategy for the on- 
going struggle for a student voice in university 
affairs. "We're now trying to form an appeals 
committee or process for this sort of thing," 
says Gosker. "They've got one at Millikin 
University and we're using that as a model." 

How does the administration view the 
possibility of the appeals process? "Well," 
Gosker said in a voice filled with hope, "the 
dean said they'd look into it." 




Help bring the world together, 
one friendship at a time. 

Before the world can be at peace, we 
must first be at peace with one another: 

That's the reason for International \buth 
Exchange, a Presidential Initiative for peace. 
To bring teenagers 15-19 from ether countries 
to live for a time with American families like 
yours and attend American schools. To build 
bridges of understanding between the next 
generation of world leaders. To help bring 
the world together.. .one friendship at a time. 

Volunteer host families from all segments 
of American society are being selected. 
If you'd like to be one of them, send for more 
information. 



mm yotmi txovvMoc r» 



THE BEST-SELLING 
MAGAZINES ON CAMPUS 

last year, according to College 
Store Executive, were 
Cosmopolitan, Glamour, 
Vogue, Mademoiselle, 
Gentleman's Quarterly, 
Playboy and Penthouse. 



UNSUNG HEROES were, 

honored at Southern Illinois 
U.-Carbondale when student 
organizations submitted 
essays on why their faculty 
adviser should be named, 
Faculty Adviser of the Year. 
The Office of Student 
Development created the 
contest because the 
dedicated faculty advisers 
have not received the 
recognition they deserve. 



PEACE CORPS AP- 
PLICATIONS ARE UP 

nationwide and Peace Corps 
officials say the dramatic 
increase is inspired by the 
famine in Ethiopia. Although 
more than half of all Peace 
Corps volunteers are currently 
in Africa, none are in Ethiopia. 
A new corps program will send 
600 volunteers to Ethiopia this 
year. 



THE BLACK STUDENT 
UNION at Northern Illinois U, 
took exception to an ad 
purchased by the Inter- 
Fraternity Council prior to a 
BSU -sponsored appearance 
of Louis Farrakhan. The IFC ad 
in the student newspaper 
urged "all students.... who 
view Farrakhan's speech... to 
remember instead Martin 
Luther King Jr.'s 'I Had a 
Dream' speech..." The BSU 
feels the ad implies it disavows 
King's principles. 



A HOMECOMING FOR 
YUPPIES? To boost 

homecoming attendance of 
the 1 most recent graduating 
classes the U. of Redlands 
alumni staff threw them 3; 
simple, inexpensive wine and 
cheese party on homecoming 
afternoon. The party drew 
400. 



OFFICIAL STATUS WAS 
DENIED for the third time to 
Bachar On Campus, a group 
trying to turn homosexuals into 
heterosexuals at the U. ° f 
Minnesota. UM policy can 
restrict groups on religious 
grounds, says a UNj 
spokesman and members of 
Bachus On Campus "have 
openly professed Jesus Christ 
as their Lord and Savior." 



Vol.73, No. 17 CURRENT SAUCE March 5, 1985 



Sports 



11 



After 3-25 season 



As expected, Yates resigns as head coach 




Head basketball coach 
Wayne Yates resigned from 
his position on Friday after 
Northwestern recorded its 
worst record ever the night 
before, as the Demons fell to 
3-25 with an 87-81 loss to 
Southeastern. 

Yates expressed regrets 
that he "was unable to turn the 
basketball program around 
during my tenure as coach.'' 
he said. 

Yates served as five years 
as head coach after an 
illustrious career at Memphis 
State University, where four of 
his five teams were ranked in 
the Top 20. 

Last season, he told 
President Orze that he would 
step down at the end of the 
1 984-85 season if there was 
not "significant progress" in 
the basketball program. 

Orze said he accepted 
Yates' resignation "with a 
sense of compassion for 
Wayne, his assistants, and the 
young men on the basketball 
team, because they all 
demonstrated unusual 
dedication and commitment in 



their efforts to bring im- 
provement to the program. 

According to Orze, the 
University's Athletic Council 
"is progressing in its search 
for a new coach, and it is 
anticipated that Yates' 
replacement will be an- 
nounced within a week. " 

Local speculation has been 
high that former Natchitoches 
resident Don Beasley, now 



"It is some consolation to 
me that we have operated a 
clean, honest program. I 
extend my best wishes..." 



-Wayne Yates 



assistant coach at the 
University of Georgia, has 
already been offered the job. 
According to the persistent 
campus rumors, NSU will wait 
until an NCAA investigation of 
the Bulldog basketball 
program is complete before an 



announcement is made. 

As of press time. Beasley 
could not be reached for 
comment. 

Yates' record in five years 
as Demon mentor was 48-92. 
His overall record at Memphis 
State and NSU is 141-141. 

This season, NSU set a 
school record with 25 losses. 
The team finished its first 
season in the Gulf Star 
Conference with a 2-8 record, 
which placed Northwestern 
last among six teams. 

In his letter of resignation, 
Yates expressed appreciation 
to Orze for his "patience, 
cooperation, and support." 
He was "grateful for the 
opportunity that I have had to 
be associated with the out- 
standing people of the 
University and the com- 
munity," said Yates. 

"It is some consolation to 
me-and I hope it is to you- 
that we have operated a clean, 
honest program. I extend my 
sincere best wishes for 
success in the future to you, 
the new basketball staff, and 
the entire University," he said. 



• Six place at SWT Rodeo 



Coach Yates 

On Friday, Wayne Yates resigned as head coach of the 
Northwestern basketball squad. Yates' record in five 
Masons as Demon mentor was 48-92, 

p rior to taking the head job at Northwestern, Yates spent 
lve years at Memphis State University, winning 20-games 
l0 «r times. 



Six members of the in- 
tercollegiate rodeo team 
placed last weekend at the 
Southern Region-National 
Intercollegiate Rodeo 
Association contest in San 



Marcos, TX. 

The team, which tied for 
sixth at the rodeo sponsored 
by Southwest Texas State, 
was led by bull rider Mike 
Yancey. He scored 67 points 




JS WAS 

j time to 
a group 
xuals into 
ie U. ° f 
>licy can 
religious 
a UM 
mbers of 
js "ha^ 
jus Chris' 
ior." 



:NOW SHO WING 



Witness-R 
M , The Breakfast Club-R 
^Qhtmare On Elm Street-R 
L Turk 182-PG-13 



COMING SOON 



The Aviator 
Porky's Revenge 
Friday 13th, PartV 
Police Academy II 



Call for Current Movie Information 
352-5109 



March 
Thurs. 7 
Fri.8 
Sat. 9 
Sun. 10 
Mon. 11 
Sat. 16 
Mon. 18 
Sat. 23 
Sun. 24 
April 
Thurs. 11 
Sat. 13 
Sun. 14 
Tues. 16 
Tues. 23 
Thurs. 23 
Tues. 30 

ALL GAMES 
FIELD behind 



1985 Demon Baseball 
(Home games only) 

Central Missouri State 
Central Missouri State 
Southern Mississippi 
Southern Mississippi 
Southern Mississippi 
Louisiana Tech 
Texas Southern 
Nicholls State 
Southeastern Louisiana 

Tulane 
Southwest Texas State 
Sam Houston State 

Louisiana State 
Stephen F. Austin 
Louisiana College 
Centenary 

PLAYED ON CAMPUS 
Prudhomme (LA School) Hall 



1:15 
1:15 
7:00 
2:00 
2:00 
1:15 
1:15 
1:15 
1:15 

2:30 
1:15 
1:15 
7:00 
5:00 
5:00 
5:00 

AT BROWN-STROUD 



on his ride to place third in the 
long go-round and fourth in the 
average. 

In steer wrestling, John 
Hoare and Brian Carroll tied for 
third in the long go-round with 
times of 6.3 seconds. Hoare 
also placed fourth in the 
average with a combined time 
of 13.5 seconds on two 
steers. 

Northwestern timed-event 
specialists Jeff Campbell and 
Jeff Manzaneres roped their 
steer in eight seconds to place 
fourth in the long go-round of 
team roping. 

Also, Pam Campbell tied for 
third in breakaway roping with 
a time of 5.4 seconds in the 
long go-round and was fifth in 
the average with a time of 
10.6 seconds on two calves. 

Bareback riding saw Keith 
Hathaway place fifth in the 
long and short go-rounds. 

Northwestern and other 
Texas and Louisiana schools 
will compete this weekend at 
Temple Junior College (TX), 
before partipating at the 
Natchitoches Fair Grounds 
next week for the Demon 
Days Rodeo, March 15-17. 



PACE 12 



March 5, 1985 CURRENT SAUCE Vol.73, No. 17 



Lady Demons down SFA, win Gulf Star 




Up for two 

Annie Harris shoots for a bucket during Wednesday's 106- 
85 Lady Demon win over Gulf Star rival Stephen F. Austin. 
The win gives the Lady Demons the GSC championship at 
10-0. 

The ladies, 20-6 overall, are hoping the season isn't over 
just yet. This weekend, either the NCAA or NIT tournament 
may call Coach Pat Pierson and tell the squad to "pack their 
bags." 



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by John Cunningham 

Sports Editor 

A season-high crowd of over 
1,700 was on hand Wed- 
nesday night to watch the 
Lady Demons win the Gulf Star 
Conference championship 
with a 1 06-85 thumping of the 
outmanned Ladyjacks of 
Stephen F. Austin State. 

The ladies clinched the title 
two games earlier, but the 
SFA win moved Nor- 
thwestern's GSC record to a 
spotless 10-0. It also ended 
the Lady Demon regular 
season at 20-6, maybe good 
enough for an NCAA or NIT 
selection committee to look at. 

Coach Pat Pierson won't 
know until this weekend 
whether or not Northwestern 
will be invited to a post-season 
tournament. 

It was the second time in a 
week that NSU and SFA 
battled on the hardwoods, as 
the two met just four days 
earlier in Nacogdoches, TX. 
Wednesday's contest in 
Prather Coliseum was a make- 
up game. 

The Lady Demons thrilled 
the home crowd by jumping 
out to an 8-2 lead against 
SFA, only to see the 
Ladyjacks outscore 1 8-6 in a 
matter of minutes to pull 
ahead, 20-14. Teressa 
Thomas then sparked an NSU 
10-point spurt that gave the 
Lady Demons the lead... for 
good. 

Twenty-nine was Nor- 
thwestern's biggest lead of 
the game, on a Sandy Pugh 



basket with just one minute 
left in the game. By this time, 
the NSU'ers were already 
celebrating, and SFA closed 
the gap to the game's final 
margin of 21 . 
Gussie Leonard pumped in 



still beat the Ladyjacks, 95- 
79. 

The Lady Demons opened 
the game to the tune of a 23- 
10 blowout of SFA, but the 
Ladyjacks came roaring back 
after a timeout to cut the NSU 





GSC 


OVERALL 


Northwestern 


10-0 


20-6 


Southeastern 


7-3 


16-10 


Southwest Texas 


4-6 


16-12 


Nicholls State 


4-6 


13-14 


Sam Houston 


3-7 


12-13 : i 


Stephen F. Austin 


2-8 


3-24 



29 points for NSU, while 
Thomas hit 24 and Lonnie 
Banks added 21. Linda 
Grayson scored 1 4 points. 

In the earlier game at the 
SFA Coliseum, Northwestern 
played a sluggish ballgame but 



lead to 27-24. That was as 
close as it got, for Nor- 
thwestern took control of the 
game after that. The 
Austinites had short spurts, 
but never enough to challenge 
the GSC champion Demons. 



NAVAL ARCHITECTURE & MARINE ENGINEERING 
at THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW ORLEANS 

Undergraduate and Graduate 
Start Summer or Fall, 1985 
Write: 
Chairman 

School of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering 
University of New Orleans 
P.O. Box 1098 
New Orleans, Louisiana 70148 
Or Phone: (504) 286-7180 




GET INV OLVED 

r 

JOIN A 
FRATERNITY 

...IT'S A MOVE 
OF A LIFETIME 



A MESSAGE FROM YOUR 
INTER FRATERNAL COUNCIL 
(IFC) 



Vol.73, No. 17 CURRENT SAUCE March 5, 1 985 



PAGE 13 



Current Quotes 



How do you feel about last week's federal indictment of Governor 
Edwards? 



as 
3r- 
he 
he 

ts, 

ge 




Cathy Holmes 

2-2, Accounting 
Montgomery 

"I feel that since he was 
indicted he should have no 
more dealings in state affairs." 



Rachel Heider 

1-2, Public Relations 
Donaldsonville 

"I think he deserves to be 
indicted. All he's doing is 
bringing the state's reputation 
down with him." 



Annette Manual 

4-2, P.E. 
Mamou 

"I'm embarassed that the 
governor of our fair state has 
been indicted and ruined the 
reputation of Louisiana." 



ATTENTION NSU CO-EDS! 

You may be qualified to become a member 
of Purple Jacket. If you meet the following 
requirements, stop by the Dean of Students 
Office (Room 309, Student Union) and pick up 
an application: 

1. A GPA of at least 2.6 

2. Membership in two chartered campus 
organizations 

3. An officer or chairman position in one of 
those organizations 

4. A junior standing by next fall 

Return the application to the Housing Office 
(Room 306, Student Union) by Noon, March 8. 




SUM MERTREE 



APTS. 

NEWLY REMODELED 
CLEAN 

REASONABLE RATES 

RESIDENT MANAGER 

CALL 352-3972 



HAVE YOU DISCOVERED 
THERE'S A LITTLE MO 
TO YOURSELF 
THESE DAYS? 




CaUAWJft 

*E CARE ABOUT YOUR HEALTH 
407 Bienville 352-3141 






Mark Self 

3-2, Piano 
Ringgold 

"I thought he was crooked 
before and I think it is only fair 
that he be indicted. I do not 
think that his interest in the 
state is as great as his own 
personal welfare." 



Bobby Matt 

1-2, Gen. Studies 
Eunice 

"I think they should convict 
him, because he has done a 
lot of wrong things this time." 



Goodwin pleased 
With scrimmage 



"We were able to get more 
done than I thought we would 
with this much inexperience," 
announced Sam Goodwin, 
head football coach, following 
Saturday's first spring 
scrimmage. 

The defending Gulf Star 
champion Demons are 
currently engaged in two 
weeks of practice, and will 
play the annual Purple and 
White spring game on March 
28. 

"I thought the defense 
looked good in that we had 
only two plays over twenty 
yards, and one of those was 
against the third team," said 
Goodwin. 

That play was an eighty-yard 
touchdown by Bo Jeter, and 
was the only touchdown of the 
ninety-minute scrimmage. 



The only other score came on 
a 41 -yard field goal by Rick 
Hammer. 

Running backs John 
Stephens, Frank Allen, and 
Jeter all rushed for over 
seventy yards. Allen carried 
the ball eleven times for 86 
yards, while Jeter managed 
83 stripes on just three 
carries. Stephens, the 1984 
Louisiana and GSC 
newcomer-of-the-year, picked 
up seventy yards on twelve 
carries. 

Wayne Van, the starting 
quarterback for most of last 
season, hit seven of eleven 
passes for 79 yards, and had 
37 yards on three carries. 
Backup quarterbacks Rob 
Fabrizio and Rusty Slack 
combined for five of sixteen 
passes for 77 yards. 




DRESS SHOP 



Updated Junior 
and Career Fashions 



329 DIXIE PLAZA SHOPPING CENTER 
NATCHITOCHES, LOUISIANA 71457 
318/352-1436 



PAGE 14 



March 5, 1 985 CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73, No. 1 7 



Letter: IM basketball too rough 



Dear Editor 

Before I get into what I want 
to discuss, let me first qualify 
myself. I am not what most 
people would call a "jock" but 
I have played basketball for 
more than eight years now, 
both recreationally and on 
organized teams. I have 
coached a team, and I have 
refereed a few games. With 
my background, it is obvious 
that I do not have a narrow 
perspective of basketball. I 
have been on both ends of the 
whistle. 

Let me begin by saying that I 
thoroughly enjoy playing 
intramural basketball. It gives 
me a chance to do something 
other than homework and 
study, but it is ridiculous to 
have to leave a game feeling 
like a worn out punching bag. 
The referees at intramural 
games have the keenest of 



eyes for the smallest of fouls 
being committed around the 
ball handler, but manage to be 
oblivious to the demolition 
derbies under the boards. 

It is simply amazing how a 
person can manage to move 
three feet without ever having 
flexed a muscle. I have 
watched people deliberately 
<ick at others with no reaction 
for the referees. I've seen 
(and felt) bear hugs that were 
called "jump-balls", have 
played "bumper cars" until my 
hips looked like D urple Pride 
incarnate for just trying to hold 
my ground, have far too often 
given piggy-back rides to 
opposing players while trying 
to get a rebound, and have 
fifteen too many elbows and 
knees meet my muscles, 
bones, and kidneys. 

I realize that as with many 
sporting events there is going 
to be some rough play and 



inevitable physical contact, 
but let's face it, people. With 
the way things are right now 
on the intramural basketball 
courts, just give us some 
Roman armos and the days of 
the gladiator will have 
returned. 

For those of you who say "if 
you can't take it, quit" I say I 
can take it and I enjoy com- 
petitive basketball too much to 
quit, but something has got to 
change, or someone who isn't 
quite as durable and lucky is 
going to be seriously injured. 
The reaching-in and slapping 
wrists might throw off 
someone's dribbling and 
shooting, but it's the elbows, 
knees, hips, and fists that 
might stop it for good. 

Bruised but not beaten 
Name withheld 
by request 



1985 Universal Press Syndicate 



WE APOLOGIZE FOR THE 
LOW QUALiTV OF THE 

sitcoms we've a/'fep 
jou\ght, sohere'sour 
station manager 75 

REAP m FUNNIES To YOU! 



® 





3-5 



Reader disagrees with Saints editorial 



Dear Editor 

This is regarding the article 
about the New Orleans Saints 
in the Feb. 5 Current Sauce. 

After reading this article, 
many NSU students were very 
angry with the poor taste that 
was put into this section. 

There is a bit of pride and 
loyalty at stake here. You say 
south Louisiana loves them 



(the Saints), but the Yankee 
part of the state, from 
Alexandria northward, seems 
to back Dallas, because Dallas 
wins, New Orleans doesn't. 

South Louisiana loves them 
because they are our team 
and we call that pride. 

I'm sure that South 
Louisiana doesn't care if North 
Louisiana backs Dallas. After 



all, if you can't pull for your 
home team then we don't 
need you. 

And about the Saints being 
the only team to go 18 years 
without a playoff berth, you're 
wrong! If you knew anything 
about football you'd known 
that it took the Steelers 27 
years to amount to anything 
and they have been in 
existence for 50 years. 



And knocking the State of 
Louisiana isn't going to help 
you at all. If you don't like it 
here why don't you leave? 
How can you say Louisiana is 
ignorant, but you continue to 
live here. That, to me, doesn't 
sound like Louisiana's 
ignorant, but someone else. 
You must be enjoying what 
Louisiana has to offer. 

And the massive headache 



Renaissance Fair offers something for all 



Dear Editor 

Thank you for running a story several weeks ago on the 
second NSU Medieval-Renaissance Festival (March 11-16), 
which includes the Med-Ren Fair scheduled for that Thursday, 
Friday and Saturday (March 1 4-16). 

Although the activities of this romantic week have been ap- 
proved and financed by the University, with President Orze's 
strong support from the start, they remain "student-oriented" 
activities: that is, they depend for their success primarily upon 
student participation and student support. In snort, both the 
Festival and the Fair depend upon you. 

So, I am again writing the Sauce as a means of speaking 
directly and personally to each student, each student 
organization, each student club, even each student gathering. 

The Festival will consist of a number of differing events: the 
film of "The Lion in Winter" with. Peter OToole and Katherine 
Hepburn, video-tapes of "King Lear" (Olivier) and "Othello" 
(Hopkins), and "Monty Python..", possibly a discussion of 
Shakespearean Tragedy and another on Courtly love, and an 
exhibit from The Texas Humanities Resource Center on 
"Treasures of the Vatican." 

At the same time, during this week, SAB is sponsoring its 
"Midterm Blitz;" the Academic Honors Banquet is being held; 
Dance is having a presentation; Music is hosting ensembles: 
Rodeo is being cowboys; and the District Literary Rally, bringing 
in over 3.000 students, is being held. 

'Tis a full, active, busy week, a week that offers something of 
interest to everyone, even to those who complain about there 
being nothing to do. 

For many people, the high point of the week will come at the 



I 



end - March 14-16 when our Medieval-Renaissance Fair is 
held. This is the time when we try to transform the campus into 
Camelot, the time when we try to bring the courts of Arthur and 
of Elizabeth to Northwestern . 

Flags and banners waving in the breezes, coats of arms 
resting against trees, poets reading their works, bawds selling 
their wares, cony-catchers seeking gulls, squires pursuring 
damsels, fools pointing out their equals, peddlars hawking their 
goods, roaring-girls challenging dandies, musicians lifting 
delicate melodies, mimes and jugglers collecting coins for their 
acts, players giving farces, all of these can come to our campus. 

BUT no one is going to give them to us; we must provide them 
ourselves. 

There is no reason why we cannot have a Med-Ren Fair here 
as popular and as fun as one anywhere. We damn well have as 
much talent, as much ability, as much potential enthusiasm and 
excitement as I have seen at any university. 

If the Fair is to get moving, gain momentum, earn the 
popularity it deserves, then it must have the support, the par- 
ticipation, the push of individuals, groups, clubs and 
organizations. 

There are still a number of activities, games, contests and 
booths that might be held-if there were sponsors for them. And, 
of course, knights and ladies, bawds and fish-mongers, flirting 
wenches and eager squires, fools and players, and soldiers and 
poets and craftsmen and wrestlers and gulls and horsemen and 
artists are all needed. 

Equally important, your ideas and suggestions are needed. 
You can reach me at 357-6272 or 352-9026. 

Joe Johnson 
Language Arts 

toV.ba 



you were talking about is not 
from the problems of 
Louisiana, but from people like 
you who always nag about 
every little thing that comes 
up. Instead of criticizing and 
arguing with each other, why 
don't you try to help out with 
each other and things might 
logically turn out right. 

Have you ever heard "united 
we stand, divided we fall?" 
Think about it. I'm not 
speaking to all of North 
Louisiana, only those who feel 
the way you do. And it's not 
only from me, but from all of 
South Louisiana. 

And another thing... Pa' 
O'Brien's is doing just fine. 
Name withheld by request 

Just for your information, I 
happen to be from South 
Louisiana and I have been a 
Saints fan for years. I don't 
feel a state purchase is the 
answer, however. I agree with 
"united we stand, divided we 
fall." That's why I feel North 
and South Louisiana are one: 
not "we don 't need you. " 

By the way, I called the 
Pittsburgh Steelers office. The 
Steelers did go nearly 40 
years (1933-1972) without 
making the playoffs, but in the 
story to which you refer I said 
"playoffs and/or have a 
winning season. " The 
Steelers posted a winning 
record in 1942-nine years 
after their founding. The 
Saints haven't done it in nearly 
twenty years. And I agree, P at 
O's is doing just fine. 

Thanks for writing! 

Editor 



Vol.73, No. 17 CURRENT SAUCE March 5, 1985 



15 



Viewpoint 



Rumors dangerous 



Word number 14 of the Demon Dictionary is 
one that most people have heard plenty of during 
their college days in Natchitoches. 

Rumors - statements associated with gossip and 
instances of backstabbing. Rumors can, and often 
do, destroy careers and even lives. 

Just two weeks ago, Northwestern's president was 
standing before the Board of Trustees for State 
Colleges and Universities, "explaining" his actions to 
the board. Why was he there? Because he heard his 
job was in jeopardy. And why was it in jeopardy? 
Because of the old NSU tradition of rumors, gossip, 
and especially in this case, backstabbing. 

The president received a full vote of confidence 
from the Trustees after he explained his position. All 
the Board heard was of NSU's declining enrollment, 
poor academic programs, and low morale. What the 
person or persons out "to get" the president forgot to 
tell them was that enrollment is up again this 
semester, our academic programs are far from poor, 
and morale is perhaps better than it has been in 
recent years. 

And the president is not the only person to have 
been affected by rumors. 

On Friday, head basketball coach Wayne Yates 
resigned his position. Before he had even done that, 
however, Natchitoches/Northwestern cranked up the 
rumor mill again about his replacement. Coach Yates 
should be glad to get out of a situation like that. It's 
hard enough to win in NCAA Division I without having 
your own University and community turning on you. 

Both Orze and Yates as individuals were un- 
doubtedly hurt by their ordeals. The president is still 
here, running NSU. And if Coach Yates had all the 
"support" people said he had, I bet he'd still be here, 
too. Complete with a winning team. 

President Orze's unfortunate situation has tar- 
nished Northwestern's reputation, and the stir 
Coach Yates has not helped Demon basketball, 
e ither. When are Northwestern's "friends" going to 
r ealize that all the public relations, good academic 
Programs, and winning teams in the world aren't 
poing to help if the public still perceives NSU as a 
b ad" institution. Right now, that perception can not 
b e very positive. 

Rumors, gossip, and backstabbing. They can be 
j^ed at a president, a coach, or anybody at Nor- 
tn western. But who actually suffers? The institution 
itself. 

^ou always hear rumors about the "impending 
c| osure" of Northwestern. They are just that: 
rurT iors. Nothing more. But if they keep going, they 
be the one thing that causes that terrible 
Dr 0phecy to come true. Ironically, if that became a 
Reality , it would affect the people who started the 
^ors, as faculty, staff, students, and an 
entir e city of 25,000 people would suffer. 

just hope the "friends" of Northwestern State 



I 

On 



,' n 'versity quit being so "friendly," and let the people 

,' re d to run the University do just that - before it's 

tQ oiate 
J oh, 



Doonesbury by garry trudeau 




USA FOR AFRICA? UlELL.SOFAR 



668,1 PONT 
KNOW.QUINCY. 
I'M SItU, SORT 
OF RETIRED. WHO 
AU ARE YOU 
ASKING? 



WE'VE GOT 
LIONEL RICHIE- , 
BRUCE SPRING- 
STEEN. 303 

DYLAN.. 

/ 




. . MICHAEL JACKSON, RAY CHARLES, 
STBVIE WONDER, BETTBMIPLBR, 
DIANA ROSS, BILLY JOEL, PAUL 
SIMON, KENNY ROGERS, LUILLI8 
NELSON, TINA TURNER, SMOKEY 
ROBINSON AND f 
DIONNE WARWICK. f,i^\ 




YOU'RE TOUGH, 
MYFR1ENP- 




Learning to play 
'The Game ' 



"I don't care if he is crooked, I'm still voting for him. If he can 
do good for the state, I don 't care how he does it. " 

Time after time I have heard that same old song, sometimes 
concerning Louisiana's gubernatorial elections, sometimes local 
politics, sometimes high school student councils. 

Louisiana, with its history of underhanded political dealings 
and colorful political figures has become quite the picture of 
dishonest government to many people. These colorful 
characters and colorful incidents have over the years imbedded 
in many people's minds that the end does indeed justify the 
means. 

As a result, many have learned to play The Game or else fail 
miserably. University presidents are expected to play The Game 
or those poor students will be accidentally looked over when it 
comes to funding for one thing or another. 

When a president refuses to play The Game and cater to the 
whims of a flamboyant political figure, or follow the advice of 
other powerful characters, he doesn't favorably affect his 
popularity. Indeed, he must sometimes fight for his job and be 
constantly aware of which fellow employees he can and cannot 
trust. 

Our president has often been criticized because he does not 
yield to political influence, because he will not kiss our gover- 
nor s posterior. That's a serious offense in Louisiana 

When Dr. Orze came here four years ago, his moving in did 
cause some upheaval, and it did take a while to adjust but 
Northwestern has achieved some stability, despite the fact that 
NSU and its president are not in the highest regard of EWE 

The end does not justify the means. The mark of a leader is 
not in how much financial success he brings, but is exemplified 
by his own stability and the perseverance with which he retains 
his own morals and ideals. And that is the sort of person I want 
to be president of my university. 



msey 



Lisa Williams 



Editor 



Managing Editor 



The 
Current Sauce 
Staff 



John Ramsey 

Editor 

Lisa Williams 

Managing Editor 

John Cunningham 

Sports Editor 

Lance Ellis 
Robin Gunter 
Kevin Hopkins 
Ricky Moore 

Staff Writers 

Warren Tape 

Art/Photography Editor 

Kevin Hopkins 

Photographer 

Stacy Scroggins 

Business Manager 

Lucy LeBlanc 

Advertising Director 

David Silver 
Carol Wegley 

Advertising Sales 

Russel Bienvenu 

Circulation/Distribution 

Peter Minder 

Adviser 

The Current Sauce 
newsmagazine is published 
weekly by students of 
Northwestern State 
University of Louisiana. It is 
student-run and financed, 
and is not associated with 
any of the University's 
colleges or departments. 

Editorial and business 
offices are located at Kyser 
Hall 225A. Office hours are 
1-4:30 p.m. Tuesday through 
Friday. The telephone 
number is (318) 357-5456. 
An answering machine will 
record messages after office 
hours. 

All correspondence is 
welcome, and should be 
brought by the office or 
mailed to P.O. Box 5306, 
University Station, Nat- 
chitoches, LA 71497. 

Deadline for both ad- 
vertising and copy is 1 p.m. 
on the Thursday preceding 
Tuesday publication. All 
contributed items must be 
signed and must include a 
telephone number. Names 
will be withheld upon 
request. 

Mail subscription rates are 
$6.00 for semester or 
$10.50 per academic year. 
Current Sauce is entered as 
second class mail in Nat- 
chitoches, LA. USPS number 
140-660. 



PACE 16 



March 5, 1985 CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73, No. 17 



The SGA will hold an open house from 11 a.m - 
4 p.m. on Tuesday and Wednesday. All students 
are encouraged to stop by the office, located on 
the second floor of the Union. For further in- 
formation, call 357-4501 . 



Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, the national music 
fraternity, was the recipient of a citation for having 
increased chapter membership by over 30 
percent. The group is planning future "smokers" 
(parties for prospective members) and possibly 
Student Body fundraisers and the spring 
musicale, featuring musicians from Northwestern 
and the surrounding area. 



On Saturday, the track team will host the 
Demon Relays at the NSU Track Complex. 
Admission for students is free, and the events will 
be run all day. 

The Louisiana Independent School Association 
(LISA) All-Star football and basketball games 
will be played Saturday at either Turpin Stadium or 
Prather Coliseum. Call the Field House at 357- 
5251 for more information. 



Intramural action this week includes a softball 
officials clinic on Tuesday at 6 p.m. in the IM 
Building, an IM Council meeting at 4 p.m. Tuesday 
in Union 236, a softball team captain's meeting at 
5 p.m. Wednesday in the IM Building. The Miller 
Softball Tourney begins Sunday. For more In- 
tramural information, call 357- 




The NSU Medieval-Renaissance Festival 

continues through Saturday on campus. The 
Med-Ren Fair begins Thursday. Most actitivies 
will be near the Old President's Home, and all 
events will be posted. For more information, call 
357- 

The Rapides Symphony Orchestra will present 
its third concert of the 1984-85 series at 3:30 
p.m. Sunday at Alexandria Senior High. Tickets 
are available at the door. Call 439-2481 for more 
information. 



Applications are now available for women 17- 
26 who have never been married to participate in 
the Miss Cenlabration pageant in Alexandria. 
This is a Miss America preliminary, and will be held 
on May 11. For an application, call 487-8791 . 



Northwestern 's chapter of the Association of 
the United States Army (AUSA) has been re- 
activated after 15 years of inactivity. The first 
meeting was held in December and the following 
officers were elected: 

Bill Doane, company commander; Brian Mar- 
shall, executive officer; David Silver, finance and 
security officer; and Richard Fenoli, administration 
NCO. 



Students should be aware that certain 
University records are maintained for each 
student, says Dr. Fred Bosarge. dean of students. 
He added that each student has certain rights to 
have access to his/her student records as well as 
Tie right to challenge the contents of those 
r ecords. Specific information about University 
student record policy is published on pages 27- 
30 of the 1 984-85 General Catalog. 



Northwestern transforms itself to Camelot 
during next week's Medieval-Renaissance 
Festival, set for Monday through Saturday on 
campus. For more information, call Joseph 
Johnson at 357-6608, 357-6272 or 352-9026. 

Coach Alan Bonnette at Nesom Natatorium has 
found a ladies' pair of treated sunglasses outside 
the building. For more information or to claim the 
glasses, call either 357-41 40 or 357-51 26. 



Noteworthy 

Let us know what your 
group or organization is 
planning! Call the Sauce 
hotline 24 hours a day at 




357-5456 



Tau Kappa Epsilon social fraternity is currently 
holding a week of fund raising for St. Jude's 
children's hospital. For more information, call the 
TKE house at 352-9470. 



The 1 985-86 application for federal student 

aid is now available in the Financial Aid office, 
located in the basement of Roy Hall. Students may 
use the form to apply for Pell Grants, SEOG, 
Work-study, SSIG and National Direct Student 
Loans. Students should continue, however, to 
use a separate application for the Guaranteed 
Student Loan. 

The eleventh annual Kappa Alpha Boxing 
Tournament to benefit Muscular Dystrophy will 
be held March 26-27 at 7:30 in Prather Coliseum. 
All fighters must sign up in the Dean of Students' 
office on the third floor of the Union. 



The diamond Demons baseball team will host 
Central Missouri State at 1:15 p.m. on Thursday 
and Friday. Southern Mississippi provides the 
opposition for Saturday (7 p.m.) and Sunday (2 
p.m.) games. All games are free to students, and 
are played at Brown-Stroud Field on campus. 



The Rotary Foundation recently announced a 
new grant program for university teachers. 

Approximately ten $10,000 grants will be 
awarded to high education faculty who teach for a 
6-10 month period in countries other than their 
own. For further information, call (312) 328- 
0100. 



Sigma Kappa social sorority has elected of- 
ficers for the upcoming year. Monica Aucoin was 
chosen as president. Other officers are Paula 
Simmons, vice-president; Ann Ramke, secretary; 
Julie Anderson, treasurer; Melissa Hightower, 
pledge educator; and Lisa Bordelon, rush 
chairman. 

New Sigma Kappa initiates are Cindy Foster, 
Rachel Heider, Wander Huhner, June Johnson, 
Michele Lavergne, Anita Lodridge, Karen Nichols, 
Suzette Sand. Nancy Seiple, Francine Sibille, Kim 
Slaton and Mikki Stark. ^usea*******.** 



Loans, grants, and campus employment 

are available to students who plan to enroll for the 
summer term. 

A student must be enrolled for six hours or more 
to be eligible for federal student aid for the 
summer session. If you plan to attend summer 
school and are in need of financial aid, visit the 
financial aid office (Roy Hall) as soon as possible 
to talk with someone concerning these federal 
student aid programs. 



Judith Lott of the College Success program 
says that response was great to her recent 
shortage of tutors; she will continue to keep a file 
of tutor applicants to be considered for future 
needs. She added that College Success now 
provides a study hall for all students, Monday 
through Thursday from 6:30-8:30 p.m. in Old 
Trade School 1 08. For more information, call the 
College of Basic Studies at 441 3. 



Deadlines for summer and fall financial aid from 
The Scholarship Bank, the largest private 
scholarship bank in the country. For more in- 
formation, send a self -addressed stamped en- 
velope to 10100 Santa Monica No. 2600, Los 
Angeles, CA 90067. 



The men's tennis team plays Arkansas Tech at 
2 p.m. on Friday at the NSU Tennis Complex. 
Students are admitted free. 




The NSU Artist Series presents organist 
Herndon Spillman in concert at 8:30 p.m. on 
Wednesday in the Recital Hall of the A.A: 
Fredericks Center. Students will be admitted with 
ID. 

Spillman will also perform from 3-7 p.m. on 
Thursday, also in the Recital Hall. 

A Job Search Workshop will be sponsored 
Tuesday and Wednesday in Union 321 by the 
Center for the Career Planning and Placement. 
Danny Seymour, Center director, is the instructor 
and all seniors and graduates are invited. Times 
for Tuesday are 3-4:30 p.m., and Wednesday 
from 4-5:30 p.m. 

The tourist haven of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 
along with islands of Nantucket and Martha's 
Vineyard, are offering thousands of summer jobs 
to college students. For more information, write 
1985 Summer Jobs, Box 594, Room 12, Barn- 
stable, MA 02630. 



The New Orleans Museum of Art, located at City 
Park in the crescent city, is currently hosting the 
"Ida Kohlmeyer: Thirty Years" art exhibit to honor 
the Louisiana painter/sculptor. There is an ad- 
mission charge to the Museum and the phone 
number is (504) 488-2631. The exhibit ends 
April 28 

Kappa Sigma social fraternity officers for the 
upcoming year are Richard deVargas, president; 
Shawn Wyble, vice-president; Greg Shoalmire, 
ritualist; Skip Waters, treasurer; and Steve 
Horton. secretary; John Brittain, Greg Jolley and 
Dan Medlin are guards. >L^M 



Current Sauce 



Northwestern State University 

of Louisiana 

Natchitoches, LA 

March 12, 1985 
Vol. 73, No. 18 




Demon Days Rodeo this weekend 



see page 1 3 



March 12, 1085 CURRENT SAUCE Vol.73, No. 18 



News 



SGA refuses appointment 



by Lisa Williams 

Managing Editor 

The SGA refused to approve 
Patrick Wyatt as editor-in-chief 
of the 1 986 Potpourri at last 
week's meeting, and 
requested that the Supreme 
Court investigate the Student 
Media Board's recent 
nomination of Wyatt as editor- 
in-chief of the yearbook. 

Caria Erickson, editor-in- 
chief of the 1985 Potpourri 
"disagreed totally" with the 
selection of Wyatt because 
"he isn't qualified." Wyatt, 
who did not work on the 1 985 
publication, was chosen by 
the committee over Kristine 
Leone and Lucy LeBlanc, both 
of whom have J past 

experience on the Potpourri. 

Erickson charged that the 
questioning of candidates by 
the Student Media Board was 
unfair. "They only brought up 
work from one candidate and 
criticized those papers. Work 
from the other two candidates 
was not brought up. Patrick, of 
course, had only high school 
experience and that is a big 
difference from college 
yearbooks." 

Wyatt is enrolled this 
semester in journalism 309 
(yearbook editing), a course in 
which the candidates for the 
position are required to have 
completed. Neither LeBlanc 
nor Leone have taken the 
course. 

Peter Minder, Potpourri 
advisor, said that Wyatt did not 
have an unfair advantage over 
the other two candidates. "As 
a matter of fact, Pat 
demonstrated a superior 
knowledge in all the various 
areas of yearbook production, 
even though he didn't have 
previous Potpourri ex- 
perience." he said. 

According to Minder, Wyatt 
has been an apprentice on the 
staff this semester and is 
getting class credit for a 
journalism practicum. 

Minder said that he "told all 
of the candidates that the 
Media Board would ask them a 
lot of questions. I tried to help 
each candidate and let him 
know what would be expected 
of them. Some were not as 
ready as others, but that is not 
unfair." 

"I wasn't aware of being 
treated unfairly while I was 
there," said LeBlanc. "I wasn't 
there during the other two 
interviews, so I don't know." 

Wyatt commented that the 
candidates were "all in- 



terviewed on equal terms. It 
was up to the Media Board." 

He also said that he was 
"upset to a certain degree. I 
had hoped that this con- 
troversy would not be blown 
to this extent I thought that 
when the Media Board 
selected me that I would be 
the choice." 

Minder said that the Media 
Board "knew what they were 
supposed to do. It was so 
clear to the Media Board who 
was the best qualified can- 
didate." 

I've been here long enough 
to see the Media Board 
nominate two other can- 
didates (KNWD and Argus), 
and I think the Media Board 
has been just about the most 
impressive administrative 
body that I have ever seen 
here atNSU." 

In reference to the KNWD 
situation, Minder continued, 
"there was only one can- 
didate. Those board members 
were smart and aware enough 
of interviewing techniques to 
really ask that candidate about 
what the radio station can do 
to improve." 



"The Media Board consists 
of administrators, faculty 
members, and students. I 
think you have a very fair 
sampling from each of those 
areas, with one requirement 
that all members have a 
specific knowlege of the 
purpose and function of the 
media in general and how it 
will affect the University." 

The Supreme Court may 
decide to ask the Media Board 
to conduct another selection 
process of the Potpourri 
position. 

Wyatt said that he still 
wished to work on the staff if 
he did not get the position of 
editor-in-chief. "I really want to 
be editor - it would be a 
valuable education for me. I 
still want to work on the staff 
because I have a knowledge 
of computers and I think I can 
do a good job." 

Editor of his high school 
yearbook, Wyatt said that 
college yearbook production 
"was not really different than 
high school yearbook 
production, it is just on a larger 
scale. With the new 
technology of computers 



being used, that makes up for 
the larger scale." 

Erickson, on the other hand, 
felt that high school yearbook 
production "differed greatly 
from college. In high school, 
our advisor told us what to do. 
We didn't figure out how to fit 
our copy and basically we 
didn't write such copy." 

One who is editor of the 
Potpourri "has to know who to 
contact" on campus, she 
continued. "A freshman 
doesn't know a lot about this 
University, things that are 
going on, what positions 
people hold, who to contact." 
Wyatt "could have learned 
that if he had been on the 
staff, but he shouldn't have to 
ask fo the staff's help - he 
should be helping the staff." 

"The Media Board members 
feel he's qualified because he 
is a journalism major. He has to 
work up just like we did," she 
said. 

Erickson declined to 
comment on who she felt 
should be editor, but said they 
"both had experience. That 
makes a big difference." 




INNE 



Medieval Happy Hour 

The Demon's Head Inne will again be in operation during 
this year's Medieval-Renaissance Fair. Stop by after class 
for a cool drink. 




Current Sauce 



March 12, 1985 
Vol. 73, No. n 



On the Cover 

Northwestern bull rider 
Ronnie Walters of 
Coushatta competes in last 
year's first Demon Days 
Rodeo. Walters will 
compete again in this year's 
rodeo, which is set for this 
weekend at the Nat- 
chitoches Parish 
Fairgrounds. See page 13 
for more information. 

Elections for students to 
serve on SAB and SGA will 
be held on Wednesday, 
with runoffs coming one 
week later. Both pictures 
and statements of can- 
didates running for 
executive positions are on 
pages 9 and 10, and 10- 
1 1 features pictures of 
candidates for SGA senator 
or SAB representative. 

Carla Erickson, editor of 
the 1985 Potpourri, is 
upset about the selection of 
Patrick Wyatt as editor of 
the 1986 edition of the 
book. Carta's letter to the 
editor is on page 19. 

What does the Current 
Sauce editorial board think 
of the three student fee 
proposals? Find out on 
page 1 9. 

The Medieval-Renaiss- 
ance Fair is now underway 
on campus. Find out more 
on page 8. 

What do you look for in an 
SGA president? Five 
students address that same 
question in this week's 
Current Quotes on pag f 
20. 

It wasn't the best of years 
for the Demon basketball 
team, but there is a bright 
spot: many talented un- 
derclassmen are returning 
For a recap of 1 984-85 as 
well as a look at records 
(good and bad) set las' 
year, see page 1 5. 

The Gulf Star Champ«*j 
Lady Demons basket!)* 
team will return eveO"! 
player next year. Why <j° 
the ladies have opponents 
"shaking in their hightops* ! 
See page 16. 



There has been an up 
swing in the number ^ 
reported crimes on c0 ' |e jL 
campuses around j 
country. A story about tn 
growing national problem 
on page 1 2. 



Vol. 73, No. 18 CURRENT SAUCE March 12, 1985 



PAGE 3 



Capital Punishment Necessary, says Supreme Court 



Capital punishment is a 
necessary deterrent to crime, 
said a Louisiana Supreme 
Court Justice in a campus 
interview last week. 

"We (the Supreme Court) 
see capital punishment as a 
necessary part of dealing with 
particularly heinous crimes," 
said Justice Jack C. Watson, 
who represents southwestern 
Louisiana (Lake Charles, 
Lafayette, etc.). "Especially 
in crime-for-profit or malicious 
crimes, like when someone 
robs a 7-11 and kills the 
cashier for no apparent 
reason." 

Watson says the Louisiana 
high court hears at least one 
case involving the death 
penalty every five weeks, the 
interval at which the court 
meets. 

"We have got to listen to 
everything very carefully in 
these death penalty cases. 
We review and review and 
review the case some more," 
he said. "We affirm about two- 
thirds of the cases. The rest 
are overturned, sent back to a 
lower court, or commuted to 
life imprisonment." 

Watson was in Natchitoches 
to visit some old friends, and 
"to have a catfish dinner out 
on Black Lake," said the 
judge. He added that his 
mother was a 1 924 graduate 
of Louisiana Normal, so he had 
ties to NSU. 

When not in session, 

MOVIES 



Watson spends his time 
studying applications to hve 
cases heard before the Court. 
Watson said that the Supreme 
Court receives about 75 
applications weekly, but hears 
only three or four of them. 

"We may hear 20 or 25 per 
month," he said. "They're 
really varied. We get work- 
men's compensation cases, 
criminal cases, property cases 
and a few accident cases," he 
added. 

Watson said that Justices 
are elected to ten-year terms 
and that it is an "honor to 
represent so many people (he 
serves 1 1 parishes). It's hard 
being a Justice - you just have 
to do what's right." 

Although the Court is 
careful to accept only im- 
portant cases, occasionally a 
lighter case hits the cour- 
troom. 

"Once we had a case where 
a man was accidentally let out 
of prison, two years early. 
During those, two years he 
committed another crime," 
said Watson. "He tried to 
convince the Court that it was 
the Department of Correc- 
tions' fault, since he could not 
have committed the crime had 
he not been let out early." 

Needless to say, the case 
lost. 

"We also had a DWI case 
where the man claims he was 
only drunk because he went 
home and had some drinks 
after the accident," chuckled 
Watson. 

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Here comes the Judge 

Louisiana Supreme Court Justice Jack Watson was interviewed last week in the Current 
Sauce office. Watson was in Natchitoches for personal business. 



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And they're both repre- 
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not the exception. The gold bar 
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earning a BSN, write: Army Nurse Opportunities, P.O. Box 7713, 
Clifton, NJ 07015. 

ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE. 






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PAGE 4 



March 12, 1985 CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73, No. 18 



Students vote today on issues, officers 



On Wednesday, students 
will not only pull levers for SGA 
officers and senators-at-large, 
but will also pull levers for or 
against four separate 
proposals. 

The four issues at stake are 
the Potpourri fee increase, the 
Student Trust Fund, the Ski 
Team renewal, and the ap- 
proval of a new SGA con- 
stitution. The fifth proposal, 
the subject of adding part-time 
students to the current 
student assessments, will be 
voted on March 20, the run- 
off date 

This will be the first time 
since 1983 that student fee 
proposals have been offered 
to students. 

Following is a brief summary 
of each bill to be voted on next 
week 

THE STUDENT TRUST FUND 
BILL was proposed by senator 
Rhonda Leydecker. This till 
would add a $5 assessment to 
student fees. A committee 
would be formed to oversee 
the usage of the fund, whch 
could only be used for student 
projects which NSU can not or 
will not fund Leydecker cites 
an example: "suppose a 




student wanted to see 
racquetball courts con- 
structed. He could go before 
the committee, and then th'jy 
would vote on it. Only 
students could decide what to 
do with the money." 

She added that it cjuld be 
used for such major projects, 
or for anything that just 
"needs fixing." 

A FEE INCREASE FOR 
POTPOURRI was authored by 
senator Eileen Haynes. Her 
bill stated that since printing 
and labor costs have risen 
dramatically snce the last 
yearbook fee increase, the 
book deserves a S5 addition 
to its assessment, which 
would bring the total irom $1 5 
to $20 in the fall semesters 
only Students would still not 
pay any spring ;issessment for 
the Potpourri. 

THE RENEWAL OF SKI TEAM 
FEES is set to come up this 
year, as it is now two years 
since the bill's original ap- 
proval. Currently, students 
pay $1 per semester for ski 
team funding. If the renewal 
passes, the team will continue 
to receive student funds 

STUDENT APPROVAL OF A 



NEW SGA CONSTITUTION 

must also be voted on. The 
new constitution, according to 
Tod Klotzbach, SGA 
president, is simply a newer 
version of the old one, with the 
loopholes being tightened. 
"There are really no major 
changes," he said. 

STUDENT FEES FOR PART- 
TIME STUDENTS will come up 
on the ballot on March 20. 
Currently, Northwestern is the 



only school in the state where 
only full-time students pay 
fees. The proposal was 
passed unanimously by the 
SGA Finance Committee, 
chaired by Jon Robbins, SGA 
treasurer. Says Robbins, "this 
will let part-time students 
share the burden. They won't 
pay for anything they don't 
use." 

The plan is simply to let part- 
time students pay for student 
services which they receive, 



such as Current Sauce, 
KNWD, Argus, the Union 
drama and program fees, the 
Recreation Complex, etc. If 
approved, part-time students 
(5-11 hours) will not pay for 
Potpourri, SGA, intramurals, 
rodeo team, or ski team. 

If passed, the Recreation 
Complex fee for full-time 
students will be decreased in 
the fall and spring, and in- 
creased in the summer, when 
the complex is open most of 



the time. "We founu that the 
complex just isn't open 
enough in the regular 
semesters to warrant paying 
the same as in the summer, 
when it's open every day." 

If passed, the Rec. Complex 
adjustment is the only effect 
the bill will have on full-time 
students; it will not raise 
current fees. 

Next week's elections will 
be held from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m 
in the Union lobby. 



Modem Dancers to 
Present concert 



The University's Modern 
Dancers will present their 
annual spring concert 
Wednesday, at 8 p.m. in the 
Fine Arts Auditorium of the 
A. A. Fredericks Center. 

In addition to the NSU 
Modern Dancers, who per- 
form under the direction of 
Craig and Karen Nazor, the 
concert also will feature guest 
ensembles from LSU in Baton 
Rouge and Northeast in 
Monroe presenting works 
danced by students. 

According to Karen Nazor. 
this year's concert will feature 
a variety of themes presented 
in the modern idiom performed 
to many different musical 
arrangements of live and 
taped music. 

The NSU Modern Dancers 
will perform "Saul" to a 
recording of the piece for 
choir and organ which was 
presented on the NSU 
Concert Choir program last 
fall. This performance will 
feature Kerry Durr in the role 
for Saul, and Rebecca Bard- 
well in the lead role among the 
chorus of angels. 

Paula Webb will present 



Weiner 
performs 
Tuesday 



New York commedian Mark 
Weiner is scheduled to appear 
Tuesday at 7 p.m. in Union 
Junction. Sponsored by the 
Student Activities Board, the 
presentation is part of SAB's 
slate of week-long activities 
for Midterm Blitz. 

Weiner, who has appeared' 
on "Saturday Night Live," 
see "Blitz" 
on page six 



choreography to Italian 
Renaissance music for 
recorders played by Dr. Bruce 
Bullock, Tony C. Smith and Dr. 
Robert Watson of the NSU 
Music Department. Dancing 
will be Allyson Hancock, 
Kendra Lowry and Christine 
Todd of Louisiana School and 
NSU student Stacey Mills. 

Other pieces on the 
concert will range from ab- 
stract dance to a percussion 
solo by Guy Gauthreaux to 
quartet choreographed by the 
Nazors to Japanese Koto 
music. 

Performing with the LSU 
modern dance ensemble will 
be Kara Andrews. 



ELECT 



Rhonda 
Leydecker 

SGA Secretary 



Combine Leadership 
With Experience 



PAID FOR BY RHONDA LEYDECKER 




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PAGE 6 



March 12, 1985 CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73. No. 18 



Over 200 expected at Academic Honors Banquet 



Students who have superior 
scholastic records will be 
recognized Wednesday at the 
24th annual Academic Honors 
Banquet. 

Scheduled for 7 p.m. in the 
Student Union Ballroom, this 
year's banquet will recognize 



more than 200 students who 
have maintained at least a 3.2 
grade-point average in the 
classroom . 

The keynote speaker for the 
banquet will be Leesville 
native and 1962 Nor- 
thwestern graduate Dr. 



Blitz 



Carolyn S. Leach Huntoon, 
who was appointed last 
September by the NASA to 
serve as the associate 
director of the Lyndon B. 
Johnson Space Center in 
Houston. 

Recipients of the special 
honors in over 50 award 
categories were selected this 
spring by the faculty members 
who represent the five 



colleges, 21 academic 
departments and numerous 
honorary academic 
organizations at Nor- 
thwestern. 

Sponsors of the Academic 
Honors Banquet are Phi 
Kappa Phi and the academic 
organizations of Alpha Lambda 
Delta, Sigma Theta Tau, Sigma 
Xi, Beta Beta Beta and Phi Eta 
Sigma. 



Presiding as master of 
ceremonies and presenter of 
awards will be Phi Kappa Phi 
president Dr. Edward Matis, 
professor in the Department of 
Human Services. 

Tickets for the banquet are 
$8.50 per person. They may 
be purchased in the offices of 
academic deans or from 
Jewett Hatch Leslie in Roy 
Hall 200. 



continued from 
page four 

"Late Night With David Let- 
terman" and Home Box Office 
has been nominated for the 
second year in a row for the 
National Association for 
Campus Activities (NACA) 
campus entertainment awards 
in the comedy area. 

Also to appear during 
Midterm Blitz is rhythm and 
blues band Inn-o-vation, at 6 



p.m. Thursday for an outdoor 
concert on the Esplanade 
stage of the A. A. Fredericks 
Center. 

On Friday in Union Station, 
comedian Alex Cole will 
perform at 6 p.m. following the 
Intramural arm wrestling 
contest scheduled for 4 p.m., 
also in Union Station. 

Current full-time students 
will be admitted free to these 
performances upon 
presentation of their ID. 



. God didn't give 
His only begotten Son 
to be a spokesman for 

the moral majority 

II ww ihink jt-Mis lows all |x-o|>lr — m-ii (host- who cfajul a^ivc will) I lini — 
toim- iiikl join u% in a %c] vkv uhnvdivrrsilv is not onlv allowed, bui uvlcointtl. 
I lie I pis(o|>al CJlurtll 




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Sunday Service, 10:30 a.m. 



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Available On Appointment 
Father Richard Taylor, Rector 
Telephone *«! 3113 



BUD LIGHT 




64 A.D. EMPEROR NERO COMES UP WITH A 
BRIGHT IDEA FOR ENDING URBAN BLIGHT 




Nero s fiddling around with 
bright ideas wouldn 't 
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It's the less-filhng 
light beer with the 
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So, fnends and 
countrymen, bring 



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Bud Light at your next 
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EVERYTHING 

ELSEISJUST 

ALIGHT 



mmmmmmmmm 



Proposed SGA Constitution 



PAID FOR BY SGA 



Constitution of the Student Government 
Association of Northwestern State University of 
touisiana 

PREAMBLE 

We. the students of Northwestern State 
University of Louisiana, grateful for the opportunity 
of living in a free country, desiring to benefit from 
our inherent right of setf-govenment and seeking to 
maintain and improve our general welfare tn this 
welfare in this educational environment, do hereby 
adopt and establish this Constitution. 

NAME 

The name of this organization shall be the 
Student Government Association of Northwestern 
State University of Louisiana, 

AUTHORITY AND RESPONSIBILITY 

The authonty vested in student government by 
this Constitution comes fromthe President of 
Northwestern State University and shall not be 
aflered or retracted except through procedures 
specifically enumerated in this Constitution, or be 
the President of this university Only those duties 
defined in this Constitution shall be the respon- 
sfoflity of the Student Government Association 
MEMBERSHIP 

Membership m this organization shall include the 
legislative, executive and judicial officers of the 
student body, as well as the students of Nor- 
thwestern State University 

ARTICLE I - LEGISLATIVE BRANCH 
SECTION 1: CI 1 All legislative powers of the 
Northwestern State University Student Govern- 
ment Association shaH be vested in a unicameral 
Student Senate 

CI. 2 The Student Senate shall consist of twenty- 
three (23) elected members composed as follows: 
a Ten (10) class senators, two from each un- 
dergraduate class, as well as two graduate 
senators 

b. Eleven (1 1 ) senators-at-Iarge, and 

c. Two (2} Senate seats shall be established to 
represent the Shreveport nursing students These 
seats shall be filled according to their by-laws 

01. 3. Two voting members of the Senate shall 
serve as representatives ol the Student Activities 
Board They shall be appointed by the Vice 
President with the advice and consent of the 
Senate 

SECTION J : CI. 1 The Student Senate shall have 
the sole right of impeachment and removal No 
Student Government Association executive officer 
may be removed from office except through im- 
peachment and removal proceedings in the 
Student Senate When sitting for that purpose, 
they shall be on oath or affirmation The Chief 
Justice of the Student Supreme Court shall 
preside No person shall be convicted without the 
concurrence of two-thirds of the voting Senate 
members 

SECTION 3 CI 1 The Student Senate shall 
determine qualifications necessary to run for its 
offices Once these qualifications are established, 
it shafl be the responsibility of the Election Board to 
determine whether individual candidates meet 
these qualifications 

CI 2 Two-thirds of the voting Senate members 
shal constitute a quorum to do business 
CI 3 The Student Senate may determine the rules 
of its proceedings (Rules of the Senate}, and with 
Hie concurrence of two-thirds of the Senate 
members, expell a member as provided for in the 
Rules of the Senate. 

Cl. 4. The Senate is authorized to compell the 
attendance of members in such a manner and 
under such penalties as provided for in the Rules ot 
the Senate 

SECTION 4: CI 1 The Student Senate shall make 
university -wide recommendations fo the Nor- 
thwestern administration concerning student rules 
regulations, appropriate all revenues of 
Student Government confirm or deny (by majority) 
Such nominations as the SGA President shall from 
tote to lime be called upon to make, keep informed 
con ceming the attitude of the student body with 
r 6oard to all problems of student interest, provide 
the general welfare of the student body, and 
■flake recommendations fo the President, and to 
consider and take action upon all matters referred 

(the Senate) by the University administration 
SECTION 5 CI 1 No student shall simultaneously 
terve m an executive, judicial. Election Board, or 
Student Activities Board position except those 
JJfledm Article I. Section 1 . Clause 3 
SECTION 6 CI. 1 Upon petition by ten percent of 
■* student body the Student Senate shall call and 
[feskle over a general meeting of the Student 
Gov emment Association 

ARTICLE II • EXECUTIVE BRANCH 
SECTION 1 : CI 1 The executive power of 
^western Stale University's Student Govern 
J* 1 ' Association shall be vested m the Executive 
tj** lc ' t - which is composed of a student 
7*te*tent. Vice President. Secretary. Tresurer and 
T^issioner of Elections Each shall hold office 
S*5 te "n of one year 

ACTION 2: CI 1 A SGA President shall be 
jjjjjahy elected by maiority vote of baHots cast by 

•ortf 



"*ters of the student body, in an election held 
■tet Purpose The studnet President shaH at the 



^of 
"the 



*ctivi 



his election and for the term, be a member 
student body for at least one (1) year. He 



have completed at least forty-five (45) 



m hours, and he shaH have served in an 
*e office or appointed Cabinet position He 
^■have served in at least twenty meetings which 
jT* be served over two (2) consecutive 
^Sters. excluding the summer 
rJJ^N 3: Cl 1 If the office of Student 
^^"^ent Association President should become 
tie v because of absence or temporary disability. 
( Vice President shall act as President If the 
Pto^ °' Student Government Association 
iw**"* should become vacant because of 
^Tytef'on. removal or permanent disability, the 
(^/fesident shaH become the Student 
Or Q T rirnen l Association President The president 
gj ^rnpore shal succeed the Vice President in 
j 1 ^ * Succession 

s> hould a vacancy m another executive office 
!3) ^ special election shall be held within three 
cj^*~?*s ol the accepted resignation, unless that 
^ • to be terminated wrthri sixty (60) days In 



the President may appoint a tem- 



SrJ>*acem e rTt 
^thT 4 ° 1 ^ student President shaH 
S^^te bower with the advice and consent of a 
"tejontv. to nominate and support or 



remove members of SGA boards and committees. 

including the chairman, if their appointment and 

removal is not provided for herein 

Cl 2- He shall have the power to fill all vacancies in 

the Senate with the approval of a majority of the 

Senate 

Cl. 3. He shall have the power to call special 
meetings of the Senate when he deems such 
meetings necessary, when requested to do so by 
majority of the senatiors or when reqested to do so 
by least ten percent ( 1 0) of the student body 
Cl 4 He shall represent the student body on all 
official occasions and coordinate student activities 
and services. He may address the student Senate, 
recommend for their consideration such measures 
as he shall deem necessary and expedient, he may 
convene the Senate in extraordinary session and 
take care of all acts of the Senate: he is respon- 
sible for faithfully executing the acts that are 
passed 

Cl 5 Upon petition by ten percent of the student 
body, the student President shall call and preside 
over a general meeting of Northwestern Student 
Government Association. 

SECTION 5: Cl 1 A Student Government 
Association Vice President shall be popularly 
elected by majority of the student body, in an 
election held for thai purpose The student Vice 
President shall at the time of his election and tor 
the term, be a member of the student body for at 
least one (1 ) year He shall have completed at least 
forty-live (45) semester hours, and he shall have 
served in an elective office He. shall have served 
over two consecutive semesters, excluding the 
summer 

CL 2 He shaH serve as presiding officer of the 
Senate 

SECTION 6: Cl 1 A Commissioner ol Elections 
shall be elected by the student body to serve a one 
(1) year term as provided tor in this Constitution 
He shall have served in an elected or approved 
Cabinet position for at least twenty meetings which 
may be served over two (2) consecutive 
semesters, and have completed at least forty five 
(45) semester hours of academic work 
Cl. 2 He shall serve as chairman of the Election 
Board which shall supervise all elections con- 
ducted by the Student Government Association. 
Cl 3. He shaH appoint the members of the Election 
Board subject lo approval of the Senate. 
SECTION 7: Cl. 1 An executive Secretary shall be 
popularly elected by the student body to serve a 
term of one ( t ) year 

Cl 2. The Secretary shall be responsible for all 
official correspondence and records and shall 
serve as Secretary of the school Spirit Committee 
and will serve as the Senate clerk. 
Cl 3 The Secretary shall faithfully execute all acts 
and measures delegated by the Executive Council. 
SECTION 8: Cl. 1 . An executive Treasurer shall be 
popularly elected by the student body to serve a 
term of one (1) year He shall have completed at 
least one ( 1 ) basic accounting course with a grade 
of C (2.0) or better 

Cl 2 It shall be the responsibility of the Treasurer 
to secure from the business office of the 
University, within one (t ) month after the beginning 
of the semester, a statement of the funds avaHable 
for use by the Student Government Association, to 
pay out money appropriated by the Senate, to 
make a report of the Student Government 
Association s financial status once each month, to 
provide same for publication in the Current Sauce. 
to purchase afl awards and supplies upon being 
properly requisitioned for the same and serve as 
chairman of the Budget Committee 
SETION 9 Cl 1 The Senate shaH create such 
organs as shaH be necessary and proper for the 
implementation of the duties and powers of the 
Executive Council 

SECTION 10: Cl. 1 Failure of an Executive Officer 
to perform stated duties shaH be considered 
malfeasance in office 
ARTICLES III -JUDICIAL BRANCH 
SECTION 1 Cl 1 All judicial powers of the 
Student Government Association shall be vested in 
one (1) student Supreme Court, or other student 
courts established by the Senate from time to time 
SECTION 2 Cl 1 Justice of the Supreme and 
inferior courts shafl be regularly enrolled students 
al the time of their appointment and confirmation 
Justices of the Supreme Court shaH serve a one 
( 1 ) year term coinciding with the SGA President or 
until they resign, or until they cease lo be regularly 
enrolled Northwestern State University students, 
or be impeached and convicted by a two-thirds 
maiority of the Senate 

SECTION 3. Cl 1 The Supreme Court shall 
consist of seven (7) members. 

SECTION 4: Cl. 1 The Student Government 
Association President shaH fill aU vacancies on the 
Supreme Court as they occur, with the approval of 
the Senate One Justice shall be appointed by the 
President as the Chief Justice 
SECTION 5: Cl t The judicial power of the 
student Supreme Court shaH extend to all cases 
arising under the Constitution and the acts of the 
Student Senate 

Cl. 2. The Court shall be the highest appellate 
court in the student judicial system and may caH 
cases before it on its own initiative involving 
controversies between organizations and 
students, organizations and other organizations 
and afl cases to which student government shaH be 
a party, if not otherwise provided for m the Con- 
stitution, Code ot Conduct, or Student Handbook. 
Parties mvofved may appeal a Supreme Court 
decision to the appropriate University committee 
SECTION 6: Cl 1 No court may render an opinion, 
hear evidence, or pass judgment in the absence of 
a quorum Quorum for the Supreme Court shall be 
five (5) members 

SECTION 7: Ct. 1 The student Supreme Court 
shall follow procedures prescribed n the Student 
Supreme Court Procedures and the Northwestern 
State University Code ot Conduct 

ARTICLE IV -LEGISLATION 
SECTION 1 Cf 1 A bill is defined as being a draft 
of a law presented to the legislature tor enactment 
concerning operation cr the Student Government 
Association 

Cl 2 A resolution is defined as the act of assembly 
to declare fads or express opinions or purposes, 
and not to command 

SECTION 2 Cl. 1 Any bill or resolution being 
considered for passage by the Senate may. by 



majority vote of the senate, be referred to the 
members of the student body for their approval In 
such case , the Senate shall provide for the 
publication of such Ml in the Current Sauce three 
(3) consecutive issues prior to such election 
Balloting on such bill shall take place at such time 
and in such manner as provided by the student 
Senate, and the results of such an election shaH be 
binding upon the Senate. 

Ct. 2 Student self-assessed fees, once approved 
by the Senate. shaH be referred to the members of 
the student body for their approval 
Cl 3. All legislation approved by the Senate shall 
be presented to the Student Government 
Association President If he approves, he shall sign 
il. but if not. he shafl return it to the Senate for 
reconsideration 

Cl 4 After such reconsideration, the Senate may 
override the President's veto with the concurrence 
of two-thirds of the Senators voting and present If 
any bill shall not be returned to the Senate by the 
Studenl Government Association President within 
seven days after being presented lo him. the same 
shall be enacted as it he had signed it. 
Cl 5. Having been enacted by the Student 
Government Association, all acts except those 
dealing specificaHy with the operation of the 
Student Government Association, shall be 
presented to the University President 
Cl 6 If the University President shall approve said 
legislation, he shall sign it. but if not/he shall return 
it with his objections to the student Senate THe 
Senate shall reserve Ihe right to submit the brtl to 
the Louisiana Board to Trustees lor approval or 
disappoval This action would require a two-lhtrds 
majority ot the voting Senate members present. 
Cl. 7 If any act shall nol be returned by the 
University President within ten (10) working days 
after presentation, it shall be enacted m like 
manner as If he had signed it 

ARTICLES V - ELECTIONS 
SECTION 1 Cl 1 Every officer of the Student 
Government Association shaH have, at the time ot 
filing (or office, and at the timeol mauguaralton an 
overaH 2 grade point average as certified by the 
Registrar or his designate. Any Student Goverment 
Association officer or appointee, including 
cheerleaders, judges, editors, and staff members 
of publications, shall be automaticaHy disqualified 
from holding office at the end of the semester in 
which his overall scholastic average falls below this 
minimum requirement 

Cl 2 AH candidates for election to the Senale or 
Executive Council of the Student Government 
Association must be eligible to serve his lull term ol 
office. 

Cl 3 Term of office is one (t) year, except as 
otherwise provided for herein 
Cl 4 . The members of the student body may recall 
any elected representative if the petition providing 
lor a recall election shall be signed by the number 
of members of Ihe student body in the affected 
officer's constituency equal to five percent and 
provided that the question ' ShaH be retained as an 
ollicer of the Student Goverment.'' shaU receive 
two-thirds majority of the many votes cast 
SECTION 2: Cl 1 No student may run lor any 
office of the Student Government Association 
while on disciplinary or academic probalm. and no 
student may be appointed lo any such office while 
on disciplinary or academic probation 
Cl. 2. Once in office, however, no officeholdei may 
be removed from thai office for any reason, except 
as otherwise provided for herein, except through 
impeachment proceedings by the student Senate 
as provided for in this Constitution 
SECTION 3 Cl 1 A student desiring to be a 
candidate for any of the various Student Govern 
menl Association offices shaH file a written "Notice 
of Intention" with the Dean ot Students prior to a 
deadline set by the Election Board for each 
election. 

Cl 2 The "Notice of Intention'' shall consist of the 
applicant's name, classification, scholastic average 
as certified by the Registrar, and name of office for 
which he intends lo seek election 
Cl. 3 Candidates will be certified as to their 
eligibility by the Election Board within one week 
after filing 

Cl. 4. The Commissioner of Elections shall an- 
nounce the final ballot within twenty-four (24) 
hours after the close ol nominations Anyone who 
wishes to contest the Constitutional qualifications 
of a candidate must do so within lorty-eight (48) 
hours after the announcement of the final baHot 
Cl. 5. The person involved in such protesls reserve 
the righl to appeal an Election Board decision to 
the student Supreme Court 

SECTION 4: Cl 1 . A general Student Government 
Associaton election lor Executive CouncH and 
eleven (11) Senators-at-Large shall be held no 
later than the twelfth week (counting registration as 
the first week) of the spring semester 
Cl 2. Class Senators shall be elected m a special 
election presided over by the Election Board no 
later than the fifth week of the fall semester 
(counting registration as the first week) 
Cl. 3 All elections, including voting on proposed 
Constilutional amendments and student self 
assessed fees, shall be held in the Student Union 
and any other locations set up by the student 
Senale If voting machines are unavailable locked 
baHot boxes shaH be used. PoHs shall remain open 
from 8am until 7 p m on the day of the election 
Commissioners shaH be named by the Election 
Board, no commissioner may work at the polls it he 
is a candidate for any office lo be elected in that 
election Methods and procedures in run-off 
elections must be uniform with the general election 
for that office Poll watchers may be appointed by 
the candidates 

Ct 4 In elections for Executive Officers of the 
Association or other offices in which only one post 
is vacant, and one candidate fails to secure a 
majority of votes m the general election, a run-off 
shaH be held one week later In the run-oft election . 
the two candidates having received the largest 
number of votes for each specified office shall 
compete for that office, and a simple majority, 
defined as fifty percent of the voles cast plus one, 
shall elect 

Cl 5. AH candidates for class Senators or 
Senators-at-Large receiving a majority of vot*s 
cast shall assume office after the initial baHoting 
The top number of candidates equal to not more 
than twice the number of seats vacant after that 
first baHotmg shaH be fiHed by those candidates 



receiving Ihe highest number of votes 

Cl 6 Determination of majority shall be according 

to Louisiana Law 

SECTION 5 CI 1 The inaugural ceremony shaH 
be held during each semester in which the 
Association officers of the student Senate shall 
constitute a committee for carrying out the 
inaugural ceremonies properly The retiring 
President of the Association, or his representative 
shall administer the Oalh ol Office to the Student 
Government Association Presidnet. who wtU ad- 
minister the Oath of Office to the other elected 
officials 

Cl 2. The Oath of Office shaH be worked as 
follows "I (state your name) do solemnly swear (or 
affirm) that I will faithfully execute the office to 
which I have been elected and that I will do my best 
to fulfill the duties of my office and uphold the 
Constitution of the Student Government 
Association ot Northwestern State University of 
Louisiana." 

SECTION 6 Cl 1 Each officer shall assume the 
responsibilities of his office immediately upon 
inauguration 

Cl 2 At least one meeting of the newly elected 
student Senale shall be held during the period 
remaining in the spring serhesler after 
inauguration The retiring President. Vice 
President Secretary and Treasurer of the 
Executive Council, and the retiring officers of the 
Senate shall be present at this meeting At this 
meeting. aH standing committees shall be ap- 
-pomled by the Senate, subject to the approval of 
the President ot the University 
Cl. 3, Those officers elected in the fall semester 
shall be inaugurated al the first meeting of the 
sludent Senate after the completion of the elec- 
tion 

ARTICLE VI - COMMITTEES AND BOARDS 

SECTION 1 Cl. 1 The standing committee and 
boards established under this Constitution shall be 
the foHowing Community Relations Committee. 
Committee on Organizations, Campus Security 
Relations and Traffic Committee. School Spirit 
Committee. Cheerleader Governing Board. 
Student Media Board. Student Services. Student 
Rights Committee. General University Coordination 
Committee and Committee on Committees 
Cl. 2 The newly elected Senale at Ihe time of its 
first meeting, will review the standing committees 
and shall adopt guidelines lor the organization and 
general composition of all committees except as 
otherwise provided lor herein 
Cl 3 The Committee on Committees shall comply 
with the guidelines established by the Senate for 
committees 

ARTICLE VII -FINANCES 

SECTION 1 Cl 1 The President of the Student 
Government Association shaH receive a full-time 
scholarship (A fuH-time scholarship provides a 
stipend equivalent lo the cosl of Ihe inlirmary fee. 
dining hall meal ticket, rental of any dormitory 
room, registration fee and other fees charged al 
registration.) 

Cl. 2. The scholarships lor the President, Vice 
President. Commissioner ol Elections. Secretary, 
and Treasurer ol the Association shall be paid out 
of the general student body funds The scholar- 
ships of the Current Sauce staff members shaH be 
paid from the funds of Ihe Current Sauce Agency: 
and the scholarships of the Potpourri staff shaH be 
paid out of the funds of Ihe Potpourri Agency 
These scholarships shaU be paid at such times and 
in such manner as are the other student em- 
ploymenl positons ol the University 
Cl 3 The stipend paid afl olfice holders may nol be 
changed by vote during the one year fneure of 
each office holder 

SECTION 2 CL 1. The general Student Govern 
men! Association lee shall be $63 for the faH 
semester, allocated as follows Potpourri. 15; 
Current Sauce. $3 Studenl Drama activities. $1: 
Student Union program fee. $ 1 0, Recreation 
Facility Fund. $20. Union Board drama fee. $1, 
Student Government Activity fee, $3 25. Alumni 
dues. $0 50. KNWD-FM. $3. Arugs. $1. 
Cheerleaders. $0.50. Intramurals fee. $2: Rodeo 
Team. $1. Ski Team. $1. Artist Series, $0 75 
(Should both husband and wife of a lamily be 
members of the Association, only one would be 
required to pay that portion ol the fees allocated lo 
the Potpourri Agency ) 

Cl 2 The general Student Government 
Association fee shall be $48 for the spring 
semester, allocated as follows Current Sauce. $3. 
Student Drama activities. $t. Recreation Facility 
Fund, $20; Union Board drama fee. $1. KNWD- 
FM. $3: Argus. $1. Cheerleaders. $0 50. In- 
tramurals fee. $2: Rodeo Team. $1 . Ski Team. $1 . 
Artists Series. $0 75. Student Union program fee, 
$10; Alumni dues. $0 50: Student Government 
Activity fee. $3 25 

Cl 3 The Sludent Government Association tee 
shaH be $34 25 for the summer session, allocated 
as follows Current Sauce. Sludent Drama ac 
ttvihes. $0 25. Studenl Government Activity lee. 
$1 75. Alumni dues, $0 25 Student Union 
program fee. $5. Recreation Facility Fund. $20: 
Union Board drama lee. $0 50; KNWD-FM, $1; 
Argus. $0 50 Intramurals fee. $1 . Cheerleaders 
$0 50. Rodeo Team. $1 . Shi Team. $1 
Cl 4 Of the Student Government Association 
Activity tee. $2 50 shaH be aHocated for the 
operation of (he Student Government. $0 25 for a 
reserve fund, and $1 tor an SGA speaker program 
fee. $1 shafl be used tor professional drama 
programming under Ihe Fine Arts Committee 
Q 5 Afl tuH time studenl mcludng graduate 
students of the Natchitoches campus, as defined 
by the Northwestern State University Catalogue. 
shal) pay aH fees designated m this article All full 
time graduate students ol the Natchitoches 
campus, as defined by the Dean of the Graduate 
School shaH also pay the fees enumeraled m this 
article 

Cl. 6 Full-time nursing students of Shreveport will 
pay those lees as designated by their respective 
constitutions 

SECTION 3 Cl t AH supervisory financial control 
ol the Student Government Association revenues 
and expenditures shaH be vested in the student 
Senate of the Association. 

Cl. 2 The student Senate shall review, accept or 
reject with recommendations of Ihe various 
proposed budgets from organizations receiving 
student fees The studenl Senate shaH meet lor 
budgetary reasons lo review approve or reject 



budgets trom aH organizations receiving Student 
Government Association fees no later than the 
seventh (7th) week ot each semester All said 
organizations musl submit budgets 
Cl 3 Expenditures and purchases paid out of the 
general student body fees shall be made through 
the University using normal University regulations 
unless otherwise authorized by Ihe student 
Senale 

SECTION 4 Cl 1 Expenditues and purchases 
paid out of Student Government funds shaU be 
made through thenormal purchasing procedures 
Cl -2 Other expenditures not expressly provided 
in this Constitution shafl be made only with the 
consent of the majority of those Senators present 
Cl 3. Travel expenses of students representing 
Student Government, if such trips are authorized 
by the student Senate, shall be paid if approved in 
advance Receipts must be submitted for all such 
expenditures 

ARTICLE VIII -LOAN FUND 

SECTION 1 Cl 1 The student Senate shall se! 
up rules and regulations governing the Student 
Loan Fund The lund shaH be administered b the 
STudent Loan Committee, composed of three (3) 
faculty members named by Ihe Presient ol the 
University and three (3) student members named 
by the President of the Student Government 

^ ARTITCLE IX - AMENDMENT PROCEDURE 

SECTION 1 Cl. 1 An amendment to this 
Constitution may be proposed by a two thirds vole 
of the entire membershp of iheSenate or by the 
presentation to the Senate of a proposal petition 
signed by ten percenl (l0°o) of the Studenl 
Government Association and presented lo the 
Senale. The Amendment must contain a statement 
as to the effective date of its provisions 

SECTION 2 Cl 1 Any proposed amendment ol 
the Constitution must be published in three (3) 
consecutive issues of the Current Sauce . prior to 
being voted upon by the Association The election 
to amend the Constitution shall be held within a 
week following the third publication and the 
election will be set up by the student Senate 
Ratification of amendments hall be a twolhirds 
majority ol the votes cast 

ARTICLE X - STUDENT MEDIA 

SECTION 1 Cl 1 The Sludent Media Board is 
designated by the Student Government 
Association as the delacto board of 
publishers directors for students media and will be 
res ponsible directly to the President ol the 
University the sludent media is defined as the 
Current Sauce. Potpourri. Argus, and KNWD-FM 
All wiH relate to the Student Media Board in the 
same way thai a publication radio station is 
responsible lo its board ol publishers directors 

Cl. 2. The Board willb e a strong and active 
Board 

Cl 3 The Sludent Media Board will not act as a 
censorship agency, ml iwll it take any actions 
which are no appropriate m light of current ethical 
or legal situations related to student media on 
university campuses 

CL 4 Functions of the Student Media Board will 
be 

(a) Provide University-level broad guidelines lo 
the publications radio station 

(b) Recommend to the President of the 
Univeistty the name of faculty staff member to 
serve as faculty advisor lor each publicalion radio 
station 

(c) Select through the process, the editor of 
each publication and the station manager KNWD 
FM. with subsequent approval ot the sludent 
Senate 

(d) Recommend to the President ol the 
University the name of a faculty staff member to 
serve as budget approving agent for each 
publication radio station. 

(e) Review Ihe operational guidelines developed 
for each publication and the radio station jointly by 
the editors station manager and the advisors 

(I) Approve disapprove annual budgets (with any 
periodic reviews thereof) lor each publication and 
the radio station, with subsequent approval of the 
student Senate 

(g) Define Ihe relationships which the 
publications and Ihe radio station will have with the 
media -oriented academic programs. Student 
Affairs, and the Student Government Association 

(h) Provide a forum lor problems which may arise 
from time to time, with the option to make suitable 
recommendation to the President ol the University 
should unresolved situations occur 

(i) Keep the President of the University informed 
ol any known or pending accomplishments, 
problems, or needs 

Cl. 5 The Studenl Media Board shafl be organized 
as follows: 

(a) Chairman - Assistant to Ihe President for 
External Affairs NOTE Votes only m case ot lied 
vote 

(b) Vice Chairman Chairman. Student Govern 
menl Association Student Media Committee 

(c) Member - Dean of Students and Chief 
Sludent Affa»s Officer 

(d) Member Designee ol Head Department of 
Language Arts 

(e) Member - Student with a major associated 
with media and or requisite experiential 
background, appointed by the Sludent Govern 
menl Association Irom a consolidated list com 
posed ol recommendations made by the Depart- 
ment Head ol Language Arts, and Irom at-targe 
student applications received by the Studenl 
Government Association 

(g) Member - Student selected appointed as 
indicated m Section 1, Clause 5, (f) immediately 
preceding 

(h) Member ■ Student selected appointed as 
indicated m Section 1. Clause 5 (f) immediately 
preceding 

(i) The editor ol each student publication, the 
general manager of KNWD FM, and the University 
Comptroller all will serve as ex-officio members of 
the Board 

SECTION 2 Cl 1 The official newspaper ot the 
Student Government Association shaH be the 
Current Sauce. A representative from the Current 
Sauce shafl attend aH student Senate meetings. 



continued on 
page eight 



PAGE 8 



March 1 2, 1 985 CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73, Mo. 1 6 



Med- Ren Fair 
Now Underway 



The second annual Nor- 
thwest Louisiana Medieval 
Renaissance Festival is 
currently underway on 
campus. 

The week-long celebration, 
which ends Saturday, features 
movies, seminars, exhibits, 
video presentations, and 
discussions. The highlight of 
the festival is the Medieval- 
Renaissance Fair, which 
begins Thursday on the 
grounds of the Old President's 
Home on College Avenue. 

Joseph A Johnson, 
associate professor . of 
English, who is directing the 
festival and fair, said the 
festival is unique in that it is 
produced by individuals from 
the city and from the 
University. 

According to Johnson, the 
festival and fair will focus on 
"the glories of Arthur's 
Camelot, its valiant knights of 
the round table and beautiful 
maidens of castles high, and 
the excitement of Elizabeth's 
England, its disdainful ladies 
and love-sick fops... together 
with jugglers, dancers, 
musicians, players, sword- 
smen, wrestlers, wenches, 
pendants, ports, conycat- 
chers, clerics, dancers, gulls, 
bawds, and fools." He also 
encourages ttiose planning to 
attend to dress in costume. 

"During the three-day fair, 
which was successful last 
/ear, there -will be booths 



selling food and drink, tents 
offering games of skill and 
chance, peddlers pushing 
trinkets and cloths, poets and 
painters seeking patrons, 
troubadors and goliards and 
fools emphasizing human 
follies and. vanities," Johnson 
stated. 

-He said the Medieval- 
Renaissance Fair at Nor- 
thwestern is based upon 
actual historical fairs and upon 
the re-creations that have 
been extremely popular in 
Texas, California, Con- 
necticut, and Florida. 

On Friday and Saturday, 
members of the Society for 
Creative Anachronisms, an 
organization of medieval 
enthusiasts, will present mock 
tournaments and jousts, 
displays of armor, shows of 
magic and rounds of dancing. 

Johnson said members of 
the society will be available to 
talk with individuals interested 
in the Middle Ages and in 
starting a local chapter of the 
society. 

"Last year was a success 
especially the fencing mat- 
ches, the dunkings, the 
bellydancing, and the installing 
of the Lord of Misrule, the fool 
empowered (by President 
Orze) to play pranks on the 
pompous and to dismiss 
students from class," said 
Johnson. 



IN ARMY NURSING 
YOU KEEP 
ADDING NEW 
SKILLS. 

It's important that you're treated with the 
dignity and respect accorded an Army officer. And 
it's important to work in a modern medical cen- 
ter, earn a top salary, and travel. But perhaps the 
most important aspect of Army Nursing is the 
dedication to education. In Army Nursing you 
have the opportunity to attend professional con- 
ferences, pursue advanced degrees and study 
a variety ot pursing specialties. 

If you re a student working on your BSN 
or if you already have a BSN and are registered to 
practice in the United States or Puerto Rico, look 
into Army Nursing. Stop by or call us: 

Staff Sergeant Michael Gray, U.S. Army Nurse Corps 
600 West Capitol, Room 143, Little Rock 
(501)378-5840 

ARMY NURSE CORPS. 
BE ALL YOU CAN BE. 




How much? 

Clay Williams bargains with a merchant at the Renaissance Fair, which began on 
Monday. Williams serves this year as the Lord of Misrule. 



SGA Constitution (continued) 



continued from 
page seven 

and the minutes of each meeting shail be printed in 
the Current Sauce. 

CI 2 The staff of the Current Sauce shall 

determine at the beginning of each semester the 

frequency of publication and publication dates with 

the approval of the Student Media Board 

Cl 3 Scholarship positions on the Current Sauce 

wfli not exceed five (5) fun-time scholarships. 

including the Editor and Business Manager 

Cl 4 The Student Media Board shall nominate an 

editor -in -chief of the Current Sauce from a list of 

qualified candidates, with the approval ot the 

student Senate 

Cl 5 To be eligible for the editorship of the 
Current Sauce, the candidate must have com- 
pleted at least forty-five (45) semester hours, 
including at least three (3) hours of reporting and 
three (3) hour of editing with at least a 2 
average He most have served on the Current 
Sauce staff at (east one semester prior to his 
selection 

O 6 If no one who tiles tor the office of editor -tn- 
chief meets the qualifications the Student Media 
Board may select the best qualified candidate, with 
the approval of the student Senate 
cl 7 Candidates aspiring to obtain the office of 
editor -in -chief ol the Current Sauce shall tile a 
Notice of Intention ' with the Studenl Media Board 
containing the name of the proposed Business 
Manager and the other most important staff 
membeis The Board shall determine whether or 
not each candidate is qualified to seive in the 
poshon to which he is appointed 
Cl 8 In cooperation with the staff of the 
newspaper the editor-m -chief shall direct the 
policies of his particular publications, he shall be 
directly responsible tor its publication and its 
contents 

Cl. 9 The editor shall be responsible also for 
mam faming a publication ot the best possible 
quality and shall seek to protect the integrity of the 
University while providing an adequate medium fot 
the dissemination of student views 
Cl to The editor -m-chief shall recieve a full-time 
scholarship as defined in this Consliiution 
Cl 1 1 The Business Manager shall be an ex- 
officio member of the Sfudent Government 
Association He shall have completed at least forty- 
five (45} semester hours including the first ac- 
counting course and he must maintain a 2.0 
overall average 

Cl 12 He shall be responsible for the business 
aspects of the publication He shall also file a 
prepared budget with the Student Government 
Association Budget Committee al the first of each 
semester. 

Cl 1 3 The Current Sauce is to be free of cen- 
sorship The editor or other staff members shall no! 
be arbitrarily suspended because of student , 
faculty administration, alumni or community 
disapproval of editorial policy or content 
Cl 1 4 An editor of staff member may be removed 
from his office only by the Student Media Board 
with the approval of the student Senate 
SECTION 3 Cl 1 The official yearbook of the 
student body of Northwestern State University 
shall be the Potpourri 

Cl 2 The Potpourri staff will recieve not more than 
five (5) fuH-time scholarships 
Cl 3 The Student Media Board shall appoint an 
editor-in-chief of the Potpourri from a list of 
qualified candidates with the approval of the 
student Senate 

Cl 4 To be eligible for the editorship of the 
Potpourri, a candidate musf have completed at 
least forty-five (45) semester hours including some 
hours in magazine editing with at least at 2 
overall average He must have served on the 
Potpourri staff at least on semester prior to his 
appointment 

Cl 5 if no one files for ihe office of editor -m-chief 



who meets the above qualifications, the Student 
Media Board may select the best qualified can- 
didate with the approval of the student Senate 
Cl 6 Candidates aspiring to obtain the office of 
editor -in -chief of'the Potpourri shall He a Notice of 
Intention' with (he chapman of the Student Media 
Board, containing the names of the more important 
staff members The Board shad determine whether 
or not each candidate is qualified to serve in the 
position to which he' is appointed 
Cl 7 The editor shall be responsible for filing a 
proposed budget with the Student Government 
Association Budget Committee at the first of each 
semester 

Cl 8 In cooperation with the staff of Ihe 
newspaper the editor tn -chief shad drect the 
policies of his particular publication: he shall be 
directly responsible for its publication and -its 
contents 

Cl 9 The editor shaH be responsible for main- 
taining a publication of the best possible quality and 
shaH seek to protect the integrity of the University 
Cl 10 The editor -in -chief shall recieve a fuH-time 
scholarship as defined in this Constitution 
Cl 1 1 An editor or staff member may be removed 
from his office only by the Student Media Board 
with the approval ot the student Senate . 

SECTION 4 Cl I The official multi-media 
magazine of the student body ot Northwestern 
State University shad be the Argus. 
Cl 2 The editor-in-chief, staff and the sponsor of 
the Argus shall determine at the beginning of each 
faH semester the frequency of publication and 
publication date with the approval of the Student 
Media Board 

Cl 3 Candidates asptnng to obtain the office of 
editor-in-chiel o the Argus shall file a "Notice of 
Intention" with the Student Media Board, con- 
taining (he names of the more invariant staff 
members. The Board shall determine whether or 
not each candidate is qualified to serve in the 
position to which he is appointed. 
Cl 4 To be eligible for the position of editor-in- 
chief ol the Argus the candidate must have 
completed at least forty-five (45) semester hours 
inlcuding six (6) hours of English, with a 2 5 
average, and must have served on Argus for at 
least one semester before appointment as editor 
Cl 5 In the absence of a qualified candidate for 
the office of editor-in-chief of Argus, the Studenl 
Media Board shall, appoint the best qualified 
candidate, with the approval of the student Senate 
Cl 6. The editor-m -chief of the Argus shall receive 
a stipend of $500 00 for each semester that he 
serves in that capacity 

Cl 7 In cooperation with the staff of the Argus, the 
editor -m-chief shall direct the policies of his par- 
ticular publications, he shall be directly responsible 
for its publication and its contents The editor-m- 
chiet shall maintian a magazine of the highest 
quality and shall uphold the integrity of Nor- 
thwestern State University while providing a 
medium for the publication of the creative works of 
students of other contributors 
Cl 8. The editor shall be responsible tor filing a 
proposed budget with the Student Government 
Association Budget Committee at the first of each 
semester. 

Cl 9 The Argus is to be free of censorhip Neither 
the editor-mchiet nor the members of his staff 
shaH be arbitrarily suspended because of student, 
faculty administration, alumni, or community 
disapproval or editorial policy or content. 

SECTION 5. Cl 1 The official radio station of the 
student body of Northwestern State University 
shall be KNWD-FM A representative shall attend 
all Association meetings with the intent to air 
Cl 2 The staff of KNWD-FM shall determine at the 
beginning ol each semester the daily air times in 
accordance with the Federal Communications 
rules and regulations, with the approval of the 
Student Media Board 

Cl 3 Scholarship positions on KNWD-FM will not 
exceed one fuH-time scholaship tor the general 
manager and three half-time scholarships to be 
distributed among the remaining staff 



Cl. 4 The Student Media Board shaH nominate i 
general manager of KNWD-FM from a list of 
qualified candidates, with the approval of the 
student Senate 

Cl S. To be eligible for the general manager 
position of KNWD-FM. the candidate must have 
completed at lees! forty-five semester (451 hours 
with at least a 2 overall average He must have 
served on the staff at least one semester prior to 
his election 

Ct 6 If no one who meets the qualifications Has 
for the office of general manager, the Studenl 
Media Board may select the best qualified can- 
didate . with the approval of the student Senate 
Ct 7. Candidates aspiring to obtain the office of 
general manager of KNWD-FM shall file a "Notice 
of Intention" with the Student Media Board con 
taming the names of the more important staff 
members. The Board shall deterrrwne whether of 
not each candidate is qualified to serve in the 
position to which he is appointed 
C1.8 The general manager shall be re sponsible tor 
Ming a proposed budget with the Studenl 
Government Association Budget Committee al the 
first of the each semester 

Cl 9 In cooperation with the staff members ot 
KNWD-FM. the general manager shaH direct the 
policies of the radio station: he shaH be drectfy 
responsible for its broadcasting operation and 
content 

Cl 1 0. The general manager shaH be responstte 
also for maintaining a radio station of the best 
possible quality, shall strictly observe Federal 
Communications Comrnrssion Policy and shal 
seek to protect the integrity of the University 
Cl. 11 The general manager shaH receive a fut- 
time scholarship as defined in this Constitution* 
Cl 1 2 KNWD-FM is to be tree of censorship The 

general manager or other staff members sbdl not 
be arbitrarily suspended because of student- 
faculty, administration alumni, or comrnun*V 
disapproval of editorial policy or content 
Cl 1 3. A general manager or staff member may be 
removed from his office only by the Student Med* 
Board, with the approval of the student Senate 
ARTICLE XI - STUDENT BILL OF RIGHTS 
SECTION 1 Cl 1 The student has the right tt 
petition student government for redress «* 
grievance 

SECTION 2 Cl 1 The student has the hgM" 
judicial due process including a speedy 
confrontation of the plaintiff or his witness coi*j* 
presemption of innocence, protection aO*** 
cruel punishment, and appeal, as defined in ■* 
Northwestern State University Code of Conduct. 

SECTION 3 Cl 1 The student has the right » 
bring suit within the regular judiciary structure' ' 
any violation ol rights guaranteed by the Stud* 1 * • 
Bill of Rights or Student Regulations . 

SECTION 4 Cl 1 The studenl has the right no» 
to be twice put in jeopardy for the same offense. 

SECTION 5: Cl 1 The student has the right" 
use campus facilities subject to uniform regulato*" 
governing the facility B 

SECTION 6 Cl 1 The student has the rtgW I" 
mvite and hear any person of his choice 
subject of his choice as provided m the onjr* 
Handbook B 

SECTION 7 Cl 1 The student has the ngW * 
assembly to demonstrate inform. ° r "° r0, ^j— n 
long as the normal workings of the North w«*^ 
State University Student Government Assoc*** 
are not disrupted 

SECTION 8 Cl 1 The studenl has the nflW rf 
be secure »n his possessions against invas** 1 
privacy and unreasonable search and seizu* 

ARTICLE XII - SHREVEPORT CAMPUS65 ^ 
SECTION 1 Cl 1 A council shall be establish** 
represent each Shreveport campus an 13 !*«nfi 
councils shall be known as the Warrington c ^Jf 
Council and the Associate Degree Organisation^ 
Students Each council shaH determine its by 
under Senate direction _ # 

SECTION 2 Cl 1 A Senate seat 
established to represent each ^ reve *^7*jT(V J 
campus and shall be tilled according to the* 
laws ^ 



r 



Sta 



Vol. 73, No. 18 CURRENT SAUCE March 12, 1985 



PAGE 9 



tnef 



via* 5 



SGA 
Candidate 
Statements 




Tim Jacobs 

I, Tim Jacobs, would like to 
announce my candidacy for 
the position of Treasurer. 

I have served on SGA for the 
past year as a Senator-At- 
Large and feel that I have 
played a part in the 
revitalization of SGA. I have 
also served as an SGA 
representative to the Student 
Activities Board. I feel that I am 
able to work well with people 
of all groups, a useful tool in 
any position of government. 

When you go to the polls on 
Wednesday to vote, 
remember that Tim Jacobs will 
be a dedicated and hard- 
working member of SGA. 

Thank you. 




Stacy Scroggins 



' Wi " Taylor 




Johnny Cox 



The selection of a Student 
Government President is the 
most vitally important election 
each year at Northwestern 
State University. I, Johnny 
Cox, have recognized the 
impact and effect that the 
Student Government 
President has upon student 
life here at Northwestern. It is 
for this and other reasons that 
I have decided to announce 
my candidacy for the position 
of Student Government 
President 1985-86. As a 
Student Government Senator, 
my involvement with recent 
changes, and the internal 
organization of the Student 
Government Association, have 
educated and informed me of 
not only the role of the 
Student Government 
President, but more im- 
portantly, my responsibility to 
the students, and duty to 
Northwestern itself. We have 
made great strides in the 
Student Government 
Association this year. This 
progress must not stop here. 
My pledge is to work for the 
students, with the ad- 
ministration, and toward the 
positive goals that we have set 
for NSU. 



I would like to announce my 
candidacy for the office of 
Treasurer. As an upper level 
accounting major, I feel that I 
have the necessary 
background for the job. As a 
past senator, I feel that I have 
the experience needed to be 
an officer of SGA. As the 
current Business Manager of 
the Current Sauce, I also feel 



*inoL Ta y' or ' would like to 

&GA t 6 my candidac y f o r 
W. Usurer. A native of 
A^oches, I am a Business 
a 'Stration major pursuing 
Manner in Financial 
Ihe = emer| t. I feel that I have 
j^ded experience to 



serve as SGA Treasurer. I am 
currently the Treasurer of 
Kappa Alpha Order, and have 
served two terms. I have also 
served on the Interfraternity 
Council. It is leadership that 
proves a true leader; elect Will 
Taylor as you proven leader 1 




Shawn Wyble 



I am formally announcing my 
candidacy for president and I 
furthermore pledge myself to 
work for the benefit of the 
Students and Northwestern. 

Since entering NSU in the 
spring of 1 982 I have par- 
ticipated throughout student 
life as a member of the Demon 
football team, a Student 
Ambassadors member, NSU 
Agriculture Club vice- 
president, SGA senator (two 
years), and currently as SGA 
vice-president. 

While in SGA, I've been a 
member of the Constitution 
Revision Committee, the 
Physical • Resource and Self 
Study Committee and the 
Traffic and Parking 
Regulations Committee. 

I authored legislation to 
increase lighting on campus 
and for Safety and Emergency 
equipment. I co-wrote The 
Campus Bench Resolution, 
and a rule to automatically 
table legislation (to get student 
opinion). 

I want to increase com- 
munication between SGA and 
students and thus between 
students and administration. 



Stacy Scroggins 

that I have a working 
knowledge of business 
matters at NSU. 

I would appreciate your vote 
on March 1 3. 




Dan Kratz 



As a Senator-at-Large 
during the past year, my fellow 
senators elected my to serve 
as President Pro Tern of the 
Senate. (I would preside in the 
absence of the vice 
president.) 

Now I ask you to elect me, 
Dan Kratz, vice president of 
the Student Government 
Association. My leadership 
experience is wide in that I 
serve as Commander of ROTC 
and I am president of my 
fraternity, in addition to 
serving as a senator. As a 
senator I have worked on 
important bills dealing with 
visitation, fees and the 
election code. 

Combine experience and 
leadership. Vote for Dan Kratz 
- vice president. 



Greg Shoalmire 



During my three years as an 
NSU student, I have served in 
a variety of organizations that 
have given me the background 
for leadership to be an ef- 
fective vice-president. As a 
senator for two years, I was a 
member of the Traffic and 
Parking Committee, liason to 
the vice-president for 
University Affairs, and was 
chairman of the Constitutional 
Revision Committee in 1983. 
As a member of Blue Key and 
vice-president of Phi Eta 
Sigma, I have shown my 
desire to serve you to the best 
of my ability. For vice 
president, vote Greg 
Shoalmire. 



Will Taylor 




Reatha Cole 



I, Reatha Cole, would like to 
announce my candidacy for 
the office of Student 
Government Secretary. 

As a candidate for an 
executive seat in our 
government I realize the time 
and energy that will be ex- 
pected. If elected I feel I can 
adequately fulfill the duties of 
my office. I will, to the best of 
my ability, strive to keep 
accurate records of all 
Student Government ac- 
tivities. 

Thank you for your support. 



Rhonda Leydecker 

Through serving you as 
Senator-At-Large on the 
Student Government 
Association, I have discovered 
how rewarding it can be to be 
a part of the decision -making 
process of this university. I 
would like to further increase 
my experience and service by 
upholding the office of SGA 
Secretary, r have the 
secretarial skills and the 
student government ex- 
perience necessary to uphold 
this office and I am willing to 
serve you, the student of 
Northwestern State 
University. I, Rhonda 
Leydecker, appreciate your 
consideration and your 
support. 



PAGE 10 



Vol.73, No. 18 jjcE 



CoE 
candidates 




Jerome Cox 

I, Jerome Cox, would like to 
annouce my intention to 
participate as a candidate in 
the 1985 election for 
Commissioner of Elections. In 
the past year, the Student 
Goverment Association has 
made a great effort to improve 
its standards, redirect its 
goals, and upgrade its ef- 
ficiency. As an active member 
of that association, I have 
become very excited aobut 
the potential of student 
government at Northwestern. 
As your Commissioner of 
Elections, I will devote my time 
and energy into maintaing the 
quality of government that we 
have thus far achieved. The 
Commissioner of Elections at 
Northwestern has many vital 
responsibilities. I can assure 
you that it is a job that I will not 
take for granted. 




Leah Sherman 

I am asking for your vote on 
March 13. for the office of 
Commissioner of Elections. I 
have served on both the 
Senate and the Election Board 
for over a year and I feel that I 
have the necessary leadership 
abilities to represent the 
students of NSU. I would 
appreciate your support for 
this office. 

Leah Sherman 



SAB 
candidates 





Brian Smith 




Shannon Bennett 



Celena T. Strickland 




Jan Chatelain 



# J 

SuSu Williamson 



Senator-at-Lj 




Denise Coolman 




Christi Dickev 




Cathy Ernst 



Mo. 18 ycE March 12, 198S 



PAGE 1 1 



H$andidates 




Steve Horton 




Keith Humphries 



"Doogie" McNulty 



VOTE! 

Union lobby 
8 a.m.-7 p.m. 
ID required 




SAMPLE 
BALLOT 



Chuck Shaw 




Marvis Lewis 



Grady Norton Jr. 



Abby White 



PRESIDENT (vote for one) 

Johnny Cox 
Shawn E. Wyble 
VICE PRESIDENT (vote for one) 
Dan Kratz 
Greg Shoalmire 
SECRETARY (vote for one) 
Reatha Cole 
Rhonda Leydecker 
TREASURER (vote for one) 
Tim D. Jacobs 
Stacy Scroggins 
Will Taylor 

COMMISSIONER OF ELECTIONS (vote for one) 

Jerome Cox 
Leah Sherman 
SOPHOMORE SENATOR 

Darrell Miley (elected) 
STUDENT ACTIVITIES BOARD 
REPRESENTATIVE-AT-LARGE (vote for seven) 

Kim Antee 
Shannon Bennett 
Jan Chatelain 
Rachel Heider 
Beth Sandiford 
Brian Smith 
CelenaT. Strickland 
Susu Williamson 
SENATOR-AT-LARGE (vote for eleven) 
Debbie Adams 
Kristin Allred 
John Brittain 
Denise Coolman 
Christi Dickey 
Cathy Ernst 
Lynn Estes 
James W. Frazier 
Terri Garrett 
Kevin M. Greenhouse 
Terri Griffin 
Angie Griffith 
Steve Horton 
H. Keith Humphries, II 
Michele Lavergne 
Marvin W. Lewis, III 
Paula Loe 
Mary "Doogie" McNulty 
Leah K. Mills 
Grady N. Norton, Jr. 
Sylvester Roque 
Chuck Shaw 
Mike Taylor 
Abby White 
Clay Williams 
PROPOSITION No. 1 (vote yes or no) 
To assess all full time students an additional $5 
fee for the POTPOURRI Fund. This assessment 
shall be only collected in the Fall Semester. 
PROPOSITION No. 2 (vote yes or no) 
To continue to assess full time students at- 
tending the Natchitoches campus a $1 fee for the 
Ski Team Fund. 
PROPOSITION No. 3 (vote yes or no) 
To assess all full time students attending the 
Natchitoches campus a $5 fee to establish a 
Student Trust Fund. 




March 12, 1985 CURRENT SAUCE Vol. 73, No. 18 



12 



Spotlight 



Campuses face increasing crime rates 





Help bring the world together, 
une frieixiship at a time. 

Before the wurtd can be at peace, we 
must first be ai peace with one another. 

That's the reason for Internal juial \uuih 
Exchange, a PresjdennaJ Initiative fur peace. 
Tu bring teenager} L5- 19 from other countries 
Lj Ijve far a time with American families like 
yours and attend American schools. To build 
bridges of understanding between the next 
generation of wurki leaders. To help bring 
the world together... one friendship at a tune. 

Vi . hust families from all segments 
of American society are being selected. 
If you'd like to be one of them, send fur more 
informal kjtl 



In the summer of 1 981 , the U. of Michigan 
began the process of revising its code of 
student conduct, in part to deal with an in- 
crease in serious crimes by students. Ex- 
tensive research of codes at similar universities 
set the stage for UM's University Council, a 
student-faculty-adminstration group, to write a 
new code that would deal more effectively with 
campus disciplinary problems. 

Today, almost four years later, a revised 
version of the student code is back before the 
current University Council, which may accept 
it, revise it, or start the whole process again, 
from scratch. 

The reasons for slow implementation of the 
code will sound familiar to most campus ac- 
tivities professionals: First UM officials were 
careful to get input from campus constituencies 
at every step; secondly, the revised code 
faced vocal student resistance; and finally, 
turnover in student leadership and governance 
positions meant re-educating a new group each 
year, 

Code revisions common 

Most campuses face similar problems when 
trying to overhaul something as essential as a 
student code of conduct - and many campuses 
have or are doing this kind of maintenance 
work. "Many schools have changed their 
codes since the late '70's," says Gary Pavela 
of the U. of Maryland. "Generally, they've 
implemented stricter codes with less 
proceduralism. They're reluctant now to follow 
all the trappings of the traditional judicial 
process." 

The slow movement of the criminal justice 
system is partially responsible for the changes 
in campus rules, says Pavela and others. Even 
those - like Pavela - who don't see an increase 
in violent campus crime, say that when in- 
cidents do occur, colleges can't wait for the 
courts to act before taking action themselves. 
"If a person does committ a crime, that in- 
dividual may be out on bail very quickly and 
living and working back on campus in very 
close proximity to the victim," he comments. 
The college can't wait until the case is resolved 
to act. 

Failure to take action presents legal liabilty 
problems: If an alleged criminal is allowed to 
stay on campus and commits another crime, 
the victim can sue the campus administration. 

On the other hand, unduly hasty action 
against an alleged student criminal can also 
land an administrator in court for violating rights 
of due process. So in rewriting conduct codes, 
and trying to eliminate some of the 
hureaucracv. administrators must carefully 
examine the due-process issue. 

Crime complaints 

Sometimes even that isn't enough. At 
Michigan, the proposed new code carefully 
protected constitutional rights, says Dan 
Sharphorn. assistant policy advisor. That didn't 
stop students from complaining when it 
replaced a hearing board with one hearing 
officer. In the current revision of the new code, 
students go before an all-student board before 
they can be separated or suspended from the 
university. 

The UM administration also responded to 
student complaints by making the new rules 
applicable to faculty and staff, as well as 
students, and by limiting their jurisdiction over 
illegal acts in off-campus fraternities and 
sororities to more offenses, such as drug- 



dealing, arson, and sexual assualt. 

The issue of off-campus jurisdiction was a 
major one when the U. of Colorado-Boulder 
revised its conduct code three years ago, says 
Bill Schafer, coordinator of student conduct. 
The new code "allows us to deal with off- 
campus activities that we consider extremely 
dangerous - like the sale of drugs or a sexual 
assualt," he says. "Prior to the change, if a 
student committed a murder off campus, we 
couln't do anything." That particular change 
met a lot of resistance from students on the 
panel that made the revisions, Schafer 'says, 
but it was finally accepted. 

UC-Boulder simplified its judicial proceedings 
in two ways that are common to other cam- 
puses: It eliminated an appeals committee in 
favor of sending appeals to an administrator; 
and it restricted the role that attorneys play in 
suspension hearings. "We found that attorneys 
were presenting the entire case, from 
beginning to end," says Schaffer. "It was 
becoming like a courtroom, which we didn't 
think was appropriate. The panel that heard the 
case wanted to hear more from the student, as 
to who they were as a person." Accordingly, 



attorneys can now present only opening and 
closing arguments at such cases. 

Education through discipline 

Like UC, other campuses are trying to retain 
the educational aspect of their disciplinary 
proceedings. That's one reason why, in some 
instances, a student who commits crime 
doesn't face the same penalties a non-student 
would, says Jerry Hudson, a security director 
at the U. of North Carolina-Charlotte. It 
depends, in part, on whether the victim wants 
to press charges, he says. But the decision is 
also still a function of what's best for that 
student. "We have a lot of pressures we can 
bring to bear on a student that the police don't 
have," Hudson says. A trip downtown and a 
slap on the wrist might not be so bad for a 
student. Here, you stand up before your peers, 
and get put on probation or suspended. That 
makes an impact: We've had very good suc- 
cess with our judicial process." 

The university also has resources - medical 
facilities, alcohol treatment programs, coun- 
selors, and more - that police departments 
don't have, says Hudson. "The courts say 'in 
loco parentis' is dead, that we're no longer 
parents," he comments. "But there are things 
we can do, in an educational sense, that pay 
off." 

(Next issue: Violence against women and 
minority groups on campus.) 



USA ON- 
CAMPUS 



99* • •**•« 



THERE'll BE NO MORE TAX 
REFUNDS for people with 
delinquent student loans, if the 
IRS approves the Education 
Department's request to 
participate in a program set to 
begin next year. TheTax 
Reform Act of 1984 allows 
the IRS to apply income tax 
refunds toward repayment of 
past-due debts to the 
government. 

THE FIGHT AGAINST 
LEUKEMIA continues at 
Gerogia Tech where 33 
sororities and fraternities 
joined forces to raise 
$78,000 for leukemia 
research. The money was 
raised in memory of the U. of 
Georgia student who died 
from Leukemia seven years 
ago. Since his death, Greeks 
at both schools have com- 
bined to raise more than 
$500,000 to combat the 
disease. 

A BAN ON PORNOGRAPHIC 
FILMS at Michigan State U. 
has set two of the three 
largest student-run film 
companies on campus at odds 
with the MSU administration. 
Student directors from both 
companies say they will sue if 
the ban is not lifted. 

"SEXIST" ADS ARE 
BANNED from on-campus 
residence halls at the U. of 
Florida and two student 
housing officials say that 
violates free speech rights. 
The ban prohibits language, 
symbols and graphics "that 
would cause a person... to be 
embarrassed or degraded" 

HAVE YOU MET YOUR 
HUGGING QUOTA TODAY? 

The Campus Huggers, a group 
of more than 200 students, 
staff and faculty at Pepperdine 
U. recommend a daily 
allowance of four hugs a day 
to survive, eight for main- 
tenance and 1 2 for growth. 
Hugging has been shown to 
increase I.Q. and lengthen life 
span. 

FORMAL COMPLAINTS 
WERE FILED against the U. of 
Utah Associated Students 
president and Finance Board 
chairman, accusing them of 
allowing an illegal number of 
people to receive pay for 
serving on the ASUU cabinet. 
The complaint was filed by an 
ASUU assembly member. 

A PROPOSED STUDENT 
CODE REVISION at the U of 

Kentucky would add ."sexual 
orientation" to the list' of things 
the university would not 
discriminate against in its 
admissions or financial aids 
policies. 



............. 



Vol. 73, Wo. 18 CWtREMT SAUCE March 12,1 985 



PAGE 13 



Demon Days Rodeo 
Begins This Friday 



The second annual Demon 
Days Rodeo will be held this 
weekend. 

The three-day event will be 
held at the Natchitoches 
Parish Fairgrounds Arena, and 
is sanctioned by the National 
Intercollegiate Rodeo 
Association. 

Tickets to the event, which 
is sponsored by the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and Animal 
Sciences, are priced at $2 for 
students at the gate. Adult 
non-students will be charged 
$3 at the gate or $2 in ad- 
vance. 

Men's events include 
bareback riding, bull riding, 
saddle bronc riding, calf 



roping, team roping, and steer 
wrestling. Women will par- 
ticipate in breakaway roping, 
goat tying, and barrel racing. 

Advance tickets are on sale 
at Prather Coliseum or 
Williamson Hall on campus. 

One of the most respected 
stock contractors in 
professional rodeo will be 
bringing his top bucking 
horses and bulls to the second 

J. Bradford Ivy of Fairfield, 
Tex., who provided stock for 
last spring's rodeo, began his 
rodeo stock contracting 
business in 1 966 and became 
a stock contractor in the 
Professional Rodeo Cowboys 





This Week 
at the 
Student Body 



Wednesday 



75 Draft 
.50 Schnapps 

Thursday ^£ 

Budweiser 
Irish Blow-Out 

$ 1 1 7-oz. draft beer! 
Play specials games 
for T-shirts and steins 

Friday 

Rodeo Team fundraiser 
This McBud'sfor You! 



Association in 1 973. 

Since 1 967 famous bucking 
horses and bulls of the Ivy 
Rodeo Company have been 
featured at the PRCA National 
Finals Rodeo in Oklahoma 
City, and selection of top 
stock for the "world series" of 
professional rodeo is con- 
sidered the highest honor for a 
contractor. 

The pride of every rodeo 
stock contractor in 
professional rodeo is his string 
of bulls, and Ivy has developed 
one of the best that has been 
seen in past years not only in 
the United States but also 
Canada. 

"Cowboys are not the only 
ones who like Ivy's bulls," said 
Bryan McDonald of Eaton, 
Colo., the bull riding director 
for the PRCA. "Bullfighters 
(ike them, too. All rodeo bulls 
have the potential and some 
even the desire to hurt you, 
but at an Ivy rodeo the 
cowboys respect his bulls and 
just hope the bulls do the 
same. Every bull and also 
every horse in his string can 
make money for the cowboy." 

Wherever the Ivy .Rodeo 
Company goes, top cowboys 
follow, not just in professional 
rodeo but also at the in- 
tercollegiate level. 




That's a bunch of bull... 

NSU rodeo team member Mike Yancey rides in fast year's 
Demon Days Rodeo. This year's edition of the rodeo will be 
held this weekend at the Natchitoches Parish Fairgrounds. 



"When you go to a rodeo 
that has bucking stock from 
Bradford Ivy, you don't have to 
worry about your draw in a 
performance," said Nor- 
thwestern bull rider Ronnie 
Walters of Coushatta. ' J You 



just know that every bull in his 
string is capable of throwing 
you down. Of course, you 
know if you make the ride, 
your chances are quite good 
that you are going to be a 
winner." 



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PAGE 14 



March 1 2, 1 985 CURRENT SA UCE Vol . 7 3 , No. 1 8 




Softball team gives 
Coach first-ever win 



Lady Demon softball coach 
Linda Jones opened her 
coaching career at Nor- 
thwestern with a victory as the 
Lady Demons opened the 
softball season with a 5-4 win 
in nine innings over Northeast 
Missouri State. The Lady 
Demons dropped the nightcap 
by a 3-2 margin. 

In the opener the winning 
pitcher was transfer Donna Jo 
Lafitte, who allowed eight hits 
and just two earned runs while 
walking four and collecting two 
strikeouts. 

Catcher Wendy Zucconi 
was two for three with two 
RBIs in the contest while 
freshman Tracy Foshee was 
three of four. The Lady 
Demons scored three times in 
the ninth inning for the win. 



It's baseball season! 

Demon shortstop Rufino Suarez looks for the ball in Sun- 
day's 4-3 loss to the Cowboys of McNeese State. In the 
picture to the right, David Bailey prepares to make a catch at 
second base to force a Cowboy out. 

As of press time on Tuesday, the Demons stood at 4-, 
overall. 




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Ginger Craig started the inning 
with a double and after a 
sacrifice scored on a single by 
Jeanne Di Vittorio. Zucconi 
then doubled into score a run 
and later scored on a single by 
Foshee. 

In the bottom of the inning 
Northeast Missouri scored 
two runs to make it a 5-4 
contest before Craig fir